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October 16, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, Qctaber 16, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 16, 1970

VIETNAM STATISTICS:
Draftees face higher
risk, than enlistees

BEFORE CHRISTMAS
SKI THEEAST
DECEMBER 19-24
U of M SKI CLUB
TRAVELS TO
MT. TREMBLANT, Quebec
Information and Signup
MONDAY, OCT. 19--7:15 P.M.
Michigan Union Room 3-C

I

1 EXER

-Associated Press
Montreal Guard
Two members of the Royal 22nd Regiment walk along a section
of Montreal's financial section yesterday after they were called
up by Premier Bourbassa to help protect the Quebec people and
public buildings. The callup was in response to recent kid-
napings of two public officials by the 'Quebec Liberation Front.

WASHINGTON (CPS)-Army
draftees have almost twice as
high a chance of being killed in.
Vietnam as non-draftee enlisted
men, according to a U.S. Army
study.
During 1969, draftees were
killed at the rate of 31 per
1,000 and injured at the rate of
203 per 1,000, while first term
enlistees were killed at the rate
of 17 per 1,000 and injured at
the rate of 120 per 1,000, ac-
cording to the study..
The reason draftees tend to
be killed at a much higher rate
is that the Army, in a procedure
different from previous wars,
allows men who enlist for three
years to choose what job they
want. Because of this, draftees
who make up 56 per cent of the
men entering the Army, tend
to make up a niuch higher per-
centage of combat units.
William K. Brehm, assistant
secretary of the Army for man-
power aid reserve affairs, ex-
plains that "the popular jobs are
the ones for which people enlist.
They don't enlist for the hard-
core combat skills."
"That is why draftees tend to
populate the hard-core combat
skills-70 per cent' of the in-
fantry, armor and artillery are
draftees," says Brehm.
A Defense Department man-
power expert, who refused to be
quoted by name, told a reporter
for National Journal, a news-
letter which requested-the Army
study, that "we've studied this
problem very carefully. People
don't deem to enlist in the
Army to fight."}
"We recognize the inequity
this causes in a shooting war,"
he says, "but we- don't know
what to do about it."
College graduates are slightly
less likely to be assigned tot
combat duty but there are no
figures separating draftees from
enlistees among college gradu-
ates. 36.2 per cent of the gradu-
ates who entered the Army in
1969 were assigned to combat
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jobs, compared with the overall
rate of 43.3 per cent. 61,per cent
of the graduates were draftees.
The higher death rate of draf-
tees in Vietnam may have been
ended by an amendment to the
military procurement bill, which
would have barred the sending
of draftees to Vietnam unless
they volunteered to go.
The amendment, authored by
Sen. William Proxmire (D-
Wis.), was rejected by a vote of
22-71.
The Army says it has no fig-
ures on the chances of a draftee
serving in Vietnam, but other
figures indicate that 8,000 draf-
tees are sent to Vietnam each
month. The monthly draft call
has been, running about 10,000.
30 per cent of. all draftees then
in the Army were serving in
Vietnam on July 1, compared
with 25 per cent of first term
enlistees.
Many persons, including Sen.
Proxmire, believe the three-year
enlistees should not be able to
opt out of combat while draftees
must fight. However, the Army
is apparently unwilling to re-
move the provision because en-
listments might drop, forcing a
drastic rise in draft calls.
"As strange as it sounds,"
Brehm. said, "only 800 young
men a month out of 200 million
Americans are enlisting for
combat. If we went to an all-
volunteer force in Vietnam, it's

I

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KS-707

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{
!IG

It's the hottest
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keep you casually cozy
all season long. Warm up
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$2200

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16
Day Calendar
Electrical Engineeriig 75th Anniver-
cnvC~narna"r~rmprl no Rh

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Graduate Outing Club, Oct. 18 and
every Sun. Rain or Shine, 1:30 p.m.
Cars leave from Rackham (Huron St.
side) for afternoon of hiking. After
the hike dinner is optional.
Zero Population Growth will host

conceivable that
might get."

that's all we

'I.

1P

STUDENT
i RATES
4c to
2c
Econocopy
1217 S. Univ.
761-0087

2 FET * 2IC 0 188 WATT
FM/AM 0 STEREO COMPACT
with dual 1209 record changer
On Display At
Hi-Fi lStudio

DOWNTOWN
217 S. Main St.

sam uonierence: LC±rysLie vnt er, Dr. Spenser Havlick UM Professor and'
omas M. Cooley Lecture: New Prior- Michael Prochaska of the Ann Arbor'
Thoas . Cole Lctue: ew rio-!City Planning Commission at a meet-
ities in Criminal Justice: Bernard Bo- ing on Oct. 20. They will discuss Urban
tein, "Modernization of the Criminal Planning and Population Growth. Thej
Justice Seys mt1",OH0tuchins ' ZPG meeting will be Tuesday, October
Justice System," 100 Hutchins Hall, 20, 730 p.m. at Canterbury House. 330
3:15 P.m. Myad
Astronomy Colloq.: Prof. R. Sears.
"Solar Neutrinos," P&A Colloq Rm., 4
p.m. Chinese Student Assn. Swimming
Professional Theatre Program: "In Party, Oct. 17. Saturday, 9 p.m. YMCA
the Matter of J. Robert Oppenheim- Pool, 5th and E. William.
er,". Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m. * * * *
International Folk Dance: Barbour A.F.S. Important Club meeting on
Gym, 8 p.m. Oct. 18 (Sunday) 7:00 p.m. Room 3-C.
Astronomy Visitors' Night: (films): * * * '
"Exploring the Milky Way" and Free University Steering Committee
"Realm of the Galaxies" (to observe) j Meeting, Sunday at 7 p.m. for a pot
The Moon and a binary star: Aud. B, luck dinner at 1309 Washtenaw, Apt.
Angell Hall, 8:30 p.m. No. 3.

E

j'

121 W. Washington

668-7942

MAST'S
2 LOCATIONS

CAMPUS
619 E. Liberty

I

I

Rent

your

Roommate with
a Classified Ad
II

General Notices
Representatives from U. of Illinois
College of Law will be on campus, Oct.
22 to talk to students interested in
study of law. Please make appointments
in Jr.-Sr. Counseling Office, 1223 An-
gell Hall. '
Representatives from Law School of
Vanderbilt U. will be here Oct. 23 to
meet with student interested in law.
Make appts. in Jr.-$r. Counseling Office
-1223 Angell Hall.
.Michigan-Wisconsin Junior year in
France/Germany: Gen. info. mtg., in
Multipurpose Rm., UGLI, Nov. 3, 7:30-
10 p.m., Nov. 4 for Germany; applics.
avail. In 1223 Angell Hall, after Nov. 3.
RALEIGH BIKES DO NOT CAUSE
CANCER. SMOKE ONE TODAY.
(Contains no Cyclamates)
Carlton, Raleigh, Robin Hood,
Mercier, Falcon, Witcomb, Bob
Jackson, Pogliaghi.
Touring and Racing parts and
accessories. Complete repair facilities
for all Racing and Touring bicycles.
TURIN
iicg:
L?.
2112 N. Clark St., Chicago, Ill. 60614
Telephone: (3124 Li 9-8863
Open weekdays Noon to 8:30 p.m.
Sat & Sun 10 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Free Delivery on
All Bicycles over $100, Parts over $10
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

* * * *
UM Folk Dance Club every Friday
evening, 7:30-11 Barbour Gym teaching
7:30-8:30. Open to all.

A loaf of bread*
A jug of wine
And thou.

HAPPY HOUR
playing 5-7 following State game
MERLIN
(also playing Sat. 9:30-1 :30)

THE

CHARCOAL
HOUSE

Te OdV44eV

208 W. Huron

338 S. STATE

7:30-10 P.M.

(*stone-ground, whole wheat)
For the student body:
Genuine
. Authentic
* Navy
PEA COATS
$25
Sizes 34 to 46
CHECKMATE
State -Street at Liberty

Now Appearing Monday through Saturday V
STAN MITCHELL
AND THE
PEOPLES' CHOICE
Enjoy FINE FOOD at
REASONABLE PRICES U
While Listening to a Great
Soul and Rock Band
Open
319 S. 4thAve.Mon. thru Fri.
7319 48Av11 a.m.-2 a.m.
Sat. & Sun.
5 p.m.-2 a.m.
,' ~1p
Mon. thru Thurs., no minimum charge
)Od- ( ?..-)OG --. O.YtO~--( >O - -

I

- --

I

;2!

* HAMBURGERS Ann Arbor's
s CHICKEN Carry-Out Specialists'

850 Sport Coupe

I.

11

- -, .-., .-. I -

i! h

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