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October 16, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-16

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Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Friday, October 16, 1970

4

theatre
Overland Stage:
H eigh-ho, Silver.

Last even g we wee treated
the Overland stage inistha-s
pay in order t o enourage the
dlopenton of draticlites,-
astrey thruh a devlopn amen' o
dramati thechig he goupg
First cameuth premiearencof
David arkweherschaieu Loe
Picklye The plyis ano amuins,
vewnofuales arnd al ro-
playsin Weasee Harold and Eve-
lyn'on oe oftnheirpicale daes
thoght forthr ocuihtlyoung
lady wlads prefe a Fumrnch
reurnth, hecains plea-
sante itherg shy suitor.
thar old, paed b with tistca
analyse of hisn good poitras
te:etally emrondto pro-s
evnf e Evelyn a ccept s. e Ane f
inoent bsthrande fhorefullye
moove i nsedthes orfu
timesd Pinat.roldan Evlghce.
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any. forth incnlusiel, an
then pl enswithd an hmrous
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pany digEwr. n lra
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lveng b e terious mach
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wardms lft th s the tray of
matches As in hed Toe Pickle
we hae athensituatona of das
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epots the dialogue effectively
He onl mard fauls ta
she is toou good-lookig t im
pesoatdee a older womans- + ...
Richar Saei prill u
cessfu , a hs Edward.e hasl th s.,
thnenjtllient io n han- te.,
itd oed ful.dfo irtprd
hewsovermlle effect o the~o pa .
is codnsenlyled-.a y-intJeri
exelPiurmtifoc ndt e i k li .. m sc u i

THE ACADEMY AWARD WINNER!
BEST "'BEST DIRECTOR-Tony Richardson4
IPICURE'"BEST SCREENPLAY" John Osborne
PICTRE'BEST MUSIC SCORE~-John Addison
ABOU E A NOO/ NTDARIT-DETRLAE
TRIUMPH! > AUDY UDY
ATTEND ~A MANED U-M TE ARmTuIT: LOPuRTy REstuensstf
Use Daily Classifieds

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T~UESDAY
CH RISTOPH ER

4

4'

1411 hill STREET
1'I.1AlsI

By JIM PETERS
Although It is said that the musical
conventions of the late eighteenth century
allowed composers and performers to get
away with a lot in terms of creating new
pieces out of renegade ,movements from
older ones, or changing the instrumenta-
tion of a concerto or sonata when time or
inclination required It, these musical ethics
seldom could be stretched to condone bad
musicianship. This no longer seems to be
so.
Last night at Rackham, another example
of how the business of music exploits a
so-called cultured audience was brought
to Ann Arbor by the University Musical
Society. The Paul Kuentz Chamber Or-
chestra of Paris seems to be no more than
an ad hoc assemblage of fairly competent
players on the tour-trail of the pseudo-
intellectual's dollar. .
If it had not been for the visually affect
of the blond concert-size positive organ,.
half the evening's offerings would have not
been played; and yet, If It had not been
for the skill-less stutterings of organist
Olivier Alain, the concert may have been
more interesting.
Alain's pedal technique was not much
above the look-and-step level in Handel's
Concerto No. 13 In F Major. This placebo
wantonly named "The Cuckoo and the
Nightingale" hardly benefited fromn the

discontinuities in the keyboard line every
time Alain had to check his feet.
Haydn wrote a short piece for keyboard
instrument and orchestra in C Major: once
he printed it as a harpsichord concerto
and once as an organ concerto. But cer-
tainly one wonders whether an organ part
without pedal line augments this piece on
more than a scintillating timbre level.
Even here there was no communication, as
Alain dragged the orchestra along with
him in the first movement and displayed
a lack of sensitivity throughout the rest
unworthy even of Power Biggs.
The Sinfonia in E Major, an orchestral
excerpt from a Bach Cantata, was lifted
from Bach's own Harpsichord Concerto
in E Major to fill-in during a hectic Leipzig
period; and it perfectly explains the art-
less approach of this concert. Not the
music performed, but the attitude from
which the Chamber Orchestra operated,'
promoting twelve string players and an
organist to play orchestral concerti scored
for winds and even brass as well, would
have me question the value of this group.
It's as bad as listening to Rossini on a
"symphony" band.
Montique Frasca -Colombier, violin, and
Jean-Marie Gamard, cello, were soloists in
Christian Bach's Symphonie Concertante
in A Major. And the gallant stylistics of
this turn of the century emigre found more

favor with Kuentz's group. I heard accom-
plished string players romping through
pleasant harmonies, but even the nimble
cello line effects no serious statement.'
The two selections by French composers
were plagued by conceptual deficiencies on
different levels. One would think that
Marc-Antonine Charpentier's Concerto for
Four Groups of Viols was the most appro-
priate piece for this genre of ensemble.
string movements relying on Instrumental
texture. However, the violin does not have
the thin timbre of the viol; and the deli-
cate harmonic interplay of suspension was
lost in the slush of "the viols' counterparts
of the violin family" (sic). The orchestra's
sound was sadly monolithic.
The Prelude pour la genese by the mod-
ern, Jacques Charpentier, expresses its
ideas with a very crude vocabulary. The
rising tremelos pitched to an emphatic
cello pizzicato in the first segment lost any
promise after the trite weirdness of the
"primeval soup" of the next section.
If it is necessary, the University Musical
Society should not offer a musical season
of imported "talents" when facilities, time,
and money are given to artless performers
such as the Kuentz group. The audience
last night applauded thankfully, If not
unconsciously: but some people do know
what's going down.

"IT MUST BE SEEN !"

-Detroit News

/

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4
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I I ~A' El m EE U n- U kH wmA.Nw AA wn L kW "

4

Joseph E. Levine presents
Sophia
Lomn

An Avco Embassy Film A Carlo Ponti Production starring
Mau~eEo
Mastrolanni

inVittorlo De Sica's

4

KLN KUSSELL'S film of
0.H. LAWRENCES
INLOVE";
COLOR by DeLuxe United Artists
**and *
THE ACADEMY *AWARD WINNiER!
"BEST PICTURE"I

I

K

wjth

idrnI Ia Savelyeva Executive Producer Joseph E. Ievine
M &ici k\ Henrv MAnncini -Scrmennlav bv Cesore Zavattini

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