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October 15, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHiLDREN
meeting
Tonight, October 15, 1910-1:00
Room 2016-School of Education*
for information call Carolyn Roppy, 769-2214 (eve. 5-8)

I

page three

C14C

t l i ttn

Bat1

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, October 15, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michgan Page Three

-5

rl MICHIGAN

ENDING TONIGHT
LEE MARVIN in
"MONTE WALSH"

DIAL
5-6290

FII FRIDAY
Jojseph E. Levine presents
An Avco Embassy Film
A Carlo Ponti Production starring
in Vittorio DeSica's
Produced by Carlo Ponti and Arthur Cohn
Technicolor-Prints by Movielab
AN AVCO EMBASSY RELEASE . AW

news briefs
By The Associated Press
PALESTINIANS will be able to decide their own destiny in
a national referendum, announced King Hussein of Jordan yes-
terday. ,
Palestinians in both the east and west banks of the kingdom
will be invited to choose the regime' and governmental system they
want as well as the relationship between their chosen regime and
the Hashemite kingdom, he said.
Hussein revealed his intention in reporting on the new agree-
ment he signed Tuesday with guerrilla leader Yasir Arafat. The date
for the referendum has not been set.
COMMUNIST CHINA set off a large nuclear explosion yes-
terday to end a year long lapse in nuclear testing, according to
the United States Atomic Energy Commission.
The Commission also announced that the Soviet Union had set
off its largest nuclear detonation' since the limited test ban treaty
went into effect in 1963.
At the same time the AEC reported that the United States had
also detonated a nuclear device yesterday, marking the first time
that three nations had conducted nuclear tests on the same day.
* * *
A SUBSTITUTE AMENDMENT applying expressly to dis-
crimination on account of sex replaced the original equal rights
amendment proposed by two senators.
Sens. Birch Bayh (D-Ind.), and Marlow Cook (R-Kent.) gave
up on their original proposal, saying the revision was designed to
meet the objections of its critics while providing most of the
affirmative;benefits.
Senate debate over the proposed amendment has been long and$
vehement, although the House had passed the proposal last August
by a 350-15 vote.
EPISCOPAL CHURCH representatives, meeting in a nation-
wide conference, yesterday debated in fiery session the church's t
most controversial program.
The multimillion dollar program, designed to empower the poor f
and needy, was alternatively called the saviour of the church and itsc
death warrant.
Representatives heard pleas to retain the' program because oft
its keeping with the ministry of Jesus Christ, and to discard it andf
place top priority on gospel teaching.t

A telephone caller with a female voice
police to have the building evacuated before
The bombing claim was made in3

Women's group
takes credit for
blast' at Harvard
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. () - Harvard University's Center for
International Affairs was bombed yesterday and a women's
radical group claimed credit for the attack, dedicating it to
Angela Davis.
Davis, sought since August on murder and kidnap charg-
es, was arrested in New York Tuesday night - several hours
before the Harvard bombing.
No one was 'injured in the explosion on the top floor of
the ivy covered brick building that has .been the target of
past radical student attacks. State police estimated damage
at $40,000.

warned campus
the bombing.

Workers clear Harvard bomb blast d
POLICE RALLY:,
Poltitcal terror
worries authoril
WASHINGTON (P) - Thous- officers and Congress

nh

rrlo r.f r nl3nam or inmmn.7 i k n I

anus w. policemn ijammiied t h e
Capitol yesterday in a demonstra-
tion for stiffer laws against at-
tacks on police, while federal of-
ficials worried o v e r rapidly in-
creasing political terrorism.
The rally was called by the Fra-
ternal Order of Police "to show
the people of this country we are
fed up," John J. Harrington, na-
tional president, told some 3,500

...GK

NOW

1

DIAL
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Govt. says saoe four millionel
cars haveufe fronty weels

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WASHINGTON (M)-The Department of Trans-
portation warned yesterday that the front wheels
of four million Ford and Mercury autos, model
years 1965 through 1969, could crumple without
warning after severe stress.
The department's unprecedented "consumer
protection bulletin" followed last month's govern-
ment-initiated recall of 85,000 Ford police-pursuit
cars equipped with the potentially defective front
wheels.
The National Highway Safety Bureau, a unit
of' the Transportation Department, said it was
not demanding recall of the four million non-
police cars "because the cycle of extreme abuse
and high-speed wheel impacts required to initiate
control arm failure does not occur-except in spe-,
cial and rare instances-in nonpursuit yehicles."

Under suspicion are the lower control arms in
the cars, which hold the front wheels upright.
The government has verified some 37 cases of
control arm failure which caused front wheels
to play outward in nonpolice cars.
The bureau said testing has shown that high-,
speed impacts such as striking a curb or median
strip are necessary to cause the wheel failures.
Involved in the warning were these 1965-1969
Ford models: Custom, Custom 500, Galaxy 500,
Galaxi 500 Xl, Galaxy 500LTD, Country Sedan,
Country Squire, XL, LTD, Custom Ranch Wagon.
Also involved were 1968 and 1969 model Thunder-
birds and these 1965-1969 Mercury models: Mon-
terey, Montclair, Parklard, Commuter, Colony
Park, Brougham and Marquis.

the Capitol steps.
"It's time the peo
country face up to i
a revolution taking
Harrington.
He called for pass
lation making it a f
to cross state lines
policeman and pro
death penalty or li
ment for killing a p
fireman.
Meanvhile, Federal
seriously studying he
homegro radicalg
try to copy their La
and Canadian counte
tempting political ki
With threats of po
nations and terrorist
ready made good, ' w
afford to do nothin
Department official
day.
The official said
plans to kidnap forei
or campaigning U.S.o
come to the FBI th
mants in the radical u
"If we had said a ye
even six months ago-
ical groups were pla
on a bombing ramp
would have thought w
ing a scare issue," h
body is saying that n(
The spectre of poli
ings by terrorist gro
visiting foreign offici
paigning government
raised earlier this wee
FBI official.

a letter from "The Proud Es
sociated Press Tribe, a group of revolution
debris women." A carbon copy was ni
ed special delivery to the Associ
- -wed Press office in Boston.
The letter was typewritten,
printed in block letters at t
bottom was the reference toI
vis, a b 1 a c k former philoso
I ~teacher charged in connect
with a courtroom shootout
San Rafael, Calif.
The printing read: "We
ies heard that Angela Davis was c
tured. We dedicated this act
members on to her becauseheractions
- example have inspired us. F
pall political prisoners."
ple of th is The letter said "the fall of f
place," said sive .as just begun" and "our
fensi e will be carried on in
streets and the schools all over
age of legis- especially here in Boston.
federal crime "We want to build a militl
to attack a women's movement that coma
viding t h e itself to the destruction'of Amc
fe imprison- kan imperialism," it said.
policeman or
The group s a i d the strate
officials are hamlet program in Vietnam,
eports t h a t attempt to destroy the entire
groups mn a y ture and lifestyle of the Viett
tin American mese people," was created at1
rparts by at- Harvard center.
dnapings. "This, our tribe's first actior
olice assassi- part of a national fall offeas
bombings al- by tribes of kids all over to att
we just can't the enemy everywhere he -shc
g," a Justice his ugly face. This coincides w
said yester-offensives being waged by t
saidyeser-Viet, Cong in Southeast Asiaa
by our brothers in the prisons
reports of New York City," the letter said
gn diplomats Archibald Cox,
officials have AciadCox former L
Trough infor- solicitor general and now a H,
d drgrond. vard law professor, said the bor
undeigound ing "appears to be part of a cc
ear ago - or tinuing harassment against t
- that rad- center."

Court ask eda
to reconsider
i "
integration.,
WASHINGTON (M) - The gov-
ernment advised the Supreme
Court yesterday to consider re-
segregation and black separatism
as it decides on the steps school
systems must take to accomplish
integration.
"One ofnthe problems is not to
require too much," U.S. Solicitor
General Erwin N. Griswold told
the ?court toward the end of the
three-day hearing.
At the same time, he said chil-
dren should not be able to "opt
out" of a system that has been de-
segregated.
The government's top spokes-
man in the high court has steered
a course somewhere between civil
rights attorneys and Southern
school' boards.
For example, Griswold said
black children do not have a con-
stitutional right to attend schools
that are not identifiable racially,
but he accused the boards in Mo-
bile, Ala., and Charlotte, N.C;, of
pepetuating segregation.
riswold said Washington, D.C.,
is t'e clearest example f4 reseg-
regation '- where whites le a v e
th e schools to . avoid attending
classes against their w ill with
blacks. In the capital the public
school population is more than 90
per cent black,
Looking across the counsel ta-
ble in the courtroom to lawyers
from the NAACP Legal Defense
and Educational Fund, the solici-
tor said: "It is far f r o m clear
whether all the people they rep-
resent want to have what they
seek for them. It isn't clear to me
that black children should be
forced to go to schools they don't
want to attend.
"It remains a problem how far
black people should be forced in
these cases."

I

nning to go
page, people
ue were rais-
e said. "No-
iow."
tical kidnap-
oups against
ials or cam-
officials was
ek by a high

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mi1ch-
igan, 420, Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Pubiished daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

--tons

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