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October 14, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-14

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Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
presents
"CACTUS FLOWER",
by ABE BURROWS
October 14-17, Trueblood Theatre
Ticket Prices: $2:00 - $2.50
Box Office Open Mon. & Tues., 10 A.M.-5 P.M.;
Wed.-Sat., 10 A.M.-8 P.M.
764-5387 P.O. Box 1993 Ann Arbor 48106

page three

C14C

Sitiiian

Dai1

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, October 14, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michgan

Page Three

Page Three

GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE,
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 16-8:30 P.M.
BENEFIT PROGRAM FOR OZONE HOUSE
"An Evening in Readers' Theater"
(Play-reading by student group from EMU)
DONATION $1.00
Preceding Program, 6 P.M.
Japanese Dinner, $1.10
(SUKIYAKI)
for reservations call 662-5189 before Friday noon

news briefs
By The Associated Pres
THE QUEBEC GOVERNMENT yesterday continued negotia-
tions with the Quebec Liberation Front (FIO) for the release
of two kidnaped officials.
Prime Minister Pierre Elliot Trudeau of Canada endorsed the
action of Quebec premier Robert Bourassa in opening talks with the
F.I.Q.
The F.I.Q. is still insisting on its six demands for the release of
British diplomat James Richard Cross and of Quebec labor minister
Pierre Laporte.
* * *
U.S. B52s continued to bomb the Ho Chi Minh trail for the
fifth straight day of saturation raids.
About 30 of the U.S. bombers flew from a Thailand bas'e to empty
30 tons each ow explosives on the communist supply route.
The intensified bombing campaign was aimed at stopping North
Vietnam's "dry season" drive to send war materials to its forces in
Cambodia and Vietnam.
WARSAW PACT FORCES launched military maneuvers yes-
terday in East Germany.
The maneuvers were the largest in the pact's fifteen year history.j
For the first time Rumanian forces took part in the military ex-
ercises. East German leader Walter Ulbricht and premier Willie
Stroph were on hand to see the exercises.
About 100,000 forces from all seven pact nations were deployed.

Canada
Italy e

to

Xpects

to

follow

recognize

1 0a
Sult
By The Associated Press
a n a d a and Communist
ma yesterday agreed to es-,
lish diplomatic relations.
he two countries also agreed
exchange ambassadors within
months.

A

THE PROPOSED CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT on
women's rights was modified by an amendment to permit prayer
inthe public schools.
This addition to the amendment followed three other additions
which would exempt women from the draft, require ratification by the
necessary three-fourths of the state legislatures within seven years
and make the effective date two years after ratification.
Women's rights spokesmen opposed these additions to the version
which passed the House because it would send the bill to a House-
Senate conference which would be conducted by the bill's foes.
FRANCO-SOVIET RELATIONS were strengthened by an
agreement signed yesterday in Moscow.
The agreement, signed by French President Georges Pompidou
before he left the Soviet Union yesterday, provides for consultations
between French and Soviet representatives twice yearly.
It also provides for cooperation between the two countries in
utilizing mineral deposits in Siberia.
A separate declaration signed at the same time by the leadersj
of the two countries condemns foreign intervention in Indochina and
urges the resumption of the Mid-East peace talks.
THE DEFENSE DEPARTMENT reported yesterday that a1
Soviet ship had left Cuba after the Pentagon cited indications
that the Soviets were building a submarine base there.
Howeyer, Pentagon spokesman Daniel Z. Henkin declined to say
whether this laid to rest U.S. claims that the Soviet Union was
constructing what appeared to be a strategic naval base at Cienfuegos,
Cuba.t

YU-CHU HSUEH, Nationalist Chinese ambassador to Canada, leaves Otta
Nationalist China and Ottawa broke off diplomatic relations. The actiont
recognized Communist China.
BOMB SCARE:
Government tightens se
rfor federal offitce buildt

Italy expressed hope yesterday
that it would soon follow Canada's
action in establishing full diplo-
matic ties with Communist China.
Canada's action came 20 years
>>afterBritain took a similar course.
However, Britain and Communist
..:'China have never exchanged am-
bassadors, allowing their embas-
sies to be headed by secondary
diplomats.
pmIn Washington, Robert Mc-
Closkey, a S t.a t e Department
Press officer, expressed concern
that the agreement would have
adverse effects on the internation-
al position of Nationalist China.
S"We believe also that this con-
cern is shared by other members
of the Pacific community," Mc-
Closkey added.
At the same time, Chow Shu-
kai, Nationalist China's ambassa-
dor to the United States, decried
t~ Canada's actions as "incompre-
hensible," and a "mistake."
u Y 4.' x Meanwhile, Ottawa broke rela-
tions with Nationalist China.
-Associated Press Nationalist China, with head-
wa yesterday after quarters on Formosa, announced
came after Canada that it in turn had severed rela-
tions with Ottawa and declared
Canada had ignored "its friend-
--ship of long standing with the
government of the Republic of
China.
Yu-chu Hsueh, Nationalist am-
bassador to China, left Ottawa by
plane for New York, saying he was
distressed by Canada's decision.
Forty-six nations now recognize
Communist China and 67 h a v e
relations with the Nationalist
government.
T h e United States recognizes
agon is among the t h e Nationalists of President
dings guarded by the Chiang Kai-shek and opposed
e Defense Department Canada's move to begin the talks
own guards at most with Peking in Stockholm in Jan-
pry installations. uary 1969.
-hi o The White House in Washinig-
ad the White House ton said Canada and the United
eir own guard forces. States had discussed the question
'ederally owned build- for some time.
SA guard, 78 are o- U.S. officials said the decision
Washington, D.C. ar- in part reflected t h e easing of
Peking's relations with the West.
can't tolerate this any They added that this was an im-
t taking some action," portant development b u t would
not change U.S. policy on China.

WASHINGTON ( P) - The gov-
ernment tightened security at fed-
eral buildings and offices through-
out the nation yesterday after a
series of terrorist bombings.
A spokesman for the General
Services Administration (GSA),t
manager of federal civilian in-
stallations, said he did not know
whether the alert was prompted

HELD OVER-2nd BIG WEEK

"A BEAUTIFUL A N D ENGROSSING
FILM. NOTHING SHORT OF MASTER-
LY. PURE PLEASURE."
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine
"More successful than Ken Russell's inter-
esting rendition of 'Women in Love' earlier
this year." -vogue
The minister's daughter. Her father taught her about
God. The gypsy taught her about heaven.
D.GH. Law irce's
THE VIRGIN AND THE GYPSY
Color Prints by Movielab A CH2O N Pictures Release:a division of incom Corporation u

SENATE VOTE
Report on obscenity rejected

WASHINGTON (e) - The Senate yesterday
voted 60-5 to denounce the recent report of the
Presidential Commission on Obscenity and Porno-
graphy.
The vote to condemn the report came mo-
ments after its chief sponsor, Sen. John L. Mc-
Clellan, (D-Ark.), declared: "I fear that if we
allow and encourage the flow of obscene material,
there will be no stopping these sex offenders.
"This filth is stimulating to them, they feed on
it and the commission would guarantee that they
have their fill."
In their findings, 15 -of the 18-member com-
mission said that there is no evidence that ex-
posure to pornography is a significant cause of
crime or leads to immoral or unnatural sex acts.
They recommended that "federal, state and
local legislation prohibiting the sale, exhibition
or distribution of sexual materials to consenting
adults shoulld be repealed."
The resolution, which expresses the sense of
the Senate but has no legal force, follows closely
a letter signed by 34 Republican senators urging
President Nixon to "disavow" the commission's
findings.

McClellan and a number of other senators
said the commission wasted three years and $2
million in producing a final report they said con-
sisted of "a series of unsupported or flimsily docu-
mented opinions resting largely on a philosophy of
permissiveness"
"I do not think that the Senate should al-
low this report - which would substitute hedon-
ism for morality - to stand unchallenged," Mc-
Clellan said.
Sen. John Stennis (D-Miss.), added: "The re-
port gives the impression that the majority of the
commission haveessentially given up on human
nature and are prepared to accept a very cynical
view of any inherent good in the human soul."
Sen. Gordon Allott (R-Colo.), said he was
particularly incensed at what he termed pseudo-
scientific testing financed by the commission in-
volving measuring the reaction of young men
exposed to pornographic material.
"This is one of the worst abuses of commis-
sion power I have ever seen," Allott said, de-
nouncing the report as "revolting" and an exam-
ple of "marshmallow-headed thinking."

' by any secret information that
might warn of further attacks;
nor did he know how long the
alert might last.
The GSA placed guards on pa-
trol outside federal buildings and
in parking areas; locked all butc
the main entrances; and began
denying entrance to persons car-
rying "suspicious packages" un-
less they permitted inspection of
the parcels.
A spokesman said General Ser-
vices Administrator Robert L.
Kunzig ordered the security alert
late Monday night and it was
placed in effect yesterday.
He said the GSA had been
studying security problems "for
some time" because of bombings
against both government and
nongovernment buildings. A fed-
eral office building in Rochester,
N.Y., was hit Monday.
Kunzig said Monday that bomb
threats to federal buildings have
been running one to two a day
for months.
The alert means more activity
and longer hours for the 3,582 un-
iformed GSA guards who patrol
266 federally owned buildings and
104 other buildings or offices leas-
ed by the government throughout
the nation.
But the government also leases
another 7,321 premises which are
not protected by GSA guards -I
including 2,200 of the nation's 4,-
087 local draft boards.
The GSA has alerted such agen-
cies to step up their security ac-
tivities, and it has contacted oth-!
er federal and local law enforce-
,ment agencies.

S. Vietnam
Inew peaee
LONDON 1P) - The Saigon
government plans soon to offer
the Communist-led Vietcong a
new basis for a political settle-
ment in South Vietnam, Ameri-
can sources reported yesterday.
Details of the proposals being
prepared by the government of
president Nguyen Van Thieu
werenot disclosed. But in gen-
eral their aim, according to the
sources, will be to reinforce
President Nixon's peace initia-
tive.
The Nixon initiative called
for an internationally supervis-
ed cease-fire throughout Indo-
china; a peace conference to
end hostilities in Laos and
Cambodia along with the Viet-
nam war; negotiations for the
phased withdrawal of all for-
eign troops; the immediate re-
lease of all prisoners of war held

The Pent
federal build
GSA, but the
provides its
other militax
Congressa
also have th
Of the 266 R
ings under C
cated in the
ea.
"We just c
more without
he said.

to propose
settlemrent

('

by the contending sides; and a
fair political settlement reflect-
ing the balance of forces in
South Vietnam.
It will be Saigon's purpose to
spell out its approach to that
political settlement, the infor-
mants -said.
The Thieu administration is
expected to announce its pro-
posals within the next ten days.
In an effort to make those
proposals as attractive as pos-
sible, informants here believe,
Saigon will proclaim its read-
iness to cancel all past restric-
tions on political activities by
former members of the Viet-
cong, sympathizers and com-
munists.
North Vietnamese and Viet-
cong delegates at the Paris
peace talks have given the Nix-
on initiative a frosty reception.
But the U.S. sources said the
administration d o es not look
upon that reaction as a rejec-
tion.

O O0F'IF'TH Forum
FIFTH AVBNUU AT LIRERTy
D~OWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 76.1-9700

7 :15 and 9:00

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PRESENTS
THE OVERLAND STAGE
-Pinter's-A Slight Ache
-Premiere-The Love Pickle
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 15
330 Maynard 8 P.M. $1.00

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the Universitv of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

Wednesday, Oct. 14
SWAMP WATER
dir. JEAN RENOIR (1941)
From Renoir's Hollywood period. Not exactly
Grand Illusion, but still an excellently done
story of brutal iustice in a southern swamr.

I

show at
rom 1-9
seminar,
will talk
nd about
The ob-

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