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October 13, 1970 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-13

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, October 13, 1970

i

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY '4

, .

N EW COMMITTEE FORMED:
State personnel to investigate
'U' provisions for handicapped

Engineering unit refuses to .bar
Dow recruiter despite protest,

_ ___. ___

_______

LED ZEPPLIN III

ii

(Continued from Page 1)
Education Prof. Garry Walz,
the committee chairman, believes
that the committee will be effec-
tive because all the members are
concerned with the issue. "Just
being sensitive to the issue can
make a difference in planning and
programimng," said Walz.
Some of the expected changes
may be in terms of facilities that
are not easily accessible to t h e
handicapped. Psychology Prof.
Charles Butter, a member of the
committee, pointed' out that a
student in a wheelchair could not
take a course on the second
floor of Lane Hall because there
are stairs in front, no elevators
inside, and no ramps..
Nee suggested other areas t h a t
could be improved include better
counseling services, better p r o-
gramming, more financial and
physical aid, and better housing
facilities.
Knauss said he will put a high
priority on the committee's recom-
mendations. However, some of the
recommendations - especially.
those -involving facilities - may
require large sums of money..
Recommendations may also in-
clude special education programs
whose implementation may mean
deciding that some other programs
must be cut, said Knauss.
Although the cost may prevent
action on some recommendations,
Knauss said he believed that there
are many things that can be done
and that soon there will be plans
to work from.
The committee, however, w ill
have to face many problems. "We
still don't have really reliable
methods of gathering information
about handicapped students," said
David Kopplin, student services
counseling office staff member.
Kopplin worked with the group
that wrote the May report.
"We need to know much more
about what their needs are, a n d
much less about what we think
their needs are," he said. "And, of
course, we must find ways to meet
those needs,"
Also, the committee may have
difficulty meeting the needs of
all those handicapped. For exam-
ple, University officials f o u n d
that curb cuts, put in to help those
in wheelchairs, became hazardous
to the blind.
The general outlook,'however, is

optimistic. "The Committee ,for
the Handicapped represents a
solid University commitment to
finding solutions to the problems!
of the handicapped," said Knauss.
The members of the committee
are: Walz, who is also director of
Education Research Information
Clearing House counseling and
personnel services; Prof. Butter;
Weidenbach; psychology Prof. Ed-
ward Bordin, director of the stu-
dent affairs counseling office;

University Housing Director John
Feldkamp; Dr. Albert Girz, senior
physician of Health Service.
Other members are: Associate
Director of Admissions James
Bower; University Hospital As-
sociate Director Ernest Laetz;.
Norman Hartwig, Grad.; Mary
Iscaro, Grad.; Joseph Fisher,
supervisor of Medical Services
Program, division of Vocational
Rehabilitation, Parkview Medical
Center.

Radical feminists disrupt
'u' Teach-in on Women
(Continued from Page 1) told the audience. "And we must
serve and fight for full liberation totally bring it down.."

(Continued from Page 1).
Dow is guilty of practicing sexual
discrimination in addition to al-
leged racial bias.
One faculty member of the com-
mittee said that the question of
the woman's allegations against
Dow was not in the committee's
jurisdiction, since she was not a
student in the engineering school.
"This allegation against Dow
hasn't been investigated yet, and
must be checked out by the chem-
istry department before you can
use it to support your argument,"
Young told the students.
A student committee member
said "it is not fair to attack Dow
and throw all kinds of allegations
at them when they are not here
to defend themselves."
Prof. Young asked the students
if they could necessarily infer that
Dow is racist if it operates a com-
pany in South Africa.
Jerry DeGrieck, Student Gov-
ernment Council Vice President,
told Young that it could be in-
ferred, "because they must operate
under the laws of South Africa
which constitute racism."
Van Wylen said last night that
"we are going to look into the
question of a wholly owned sub-
sidiary in South Africa and exam-

ine the implications that it might
have on our placement policy."
"But as far as the immediate
future goes," he said, "We see no
reason not to go ahead on our
commitments."
Most of the committee members
expressed the view that a major,
precedent-setting decision was in-
volved and could not be properly
arrived at in such a short time.,
Several committee m e m b e r s
then asked the student group if a
four per cent black employment
level necessarily made Dow a
racist company. One professor
asked, "does that mean that the
NAACP discriminates a g a i n s t
whites because they are not well-
represented in its membership"?
"No," Spears replied, "It's a
different matter entirely."

After most of the committee
had agreed that more time would
be required to study the South
African question more carefully,
the comittee unanimously approv-
ed a motion proposed by engineer-
ing Prof. Joseph Aiken, to take no
action on the matter, due to lack
of knowledge of both sides of the
issue, and lack of time.
Young then proposed an amend-
ment which was approved; that
the committee investigate imme-
diately the extent of Dow's in-
volvement in South Africa, if any.
A spokesman for Vice President
for Student Services, R o b e r t
Knauss, told those present that
the vice president wished to ex-
press his interest in the matter
and offered the use of the Univer-
sity's lawyer if needed.

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of all women and all peoples.
"The women on the stage," she
added, "are not concerned with
middle class politeness."
"An autonomous, revolutionary
women's movement must destroy
the white male supremist system,"
she said. "You must choose, "the
revolution is here and now and it's
ours."
"I think all women are my sis-
ters, whether or not I agree with
their means and ends," said Gard-
ner.
"I want to develop my full hu-
man potential," shy emotionally
told the audience, "but our efforts
to develop are inhibited. I want
to see a world where all humans
can direct their own destinies."
continued, "because it is an in-
"I reject the role of 'lady,' " she
continued, "because it is an ex-
hibiting role. Women must be
people, not ladies or sex-objects.
They must be what they define
for themselves."
"This planet is being destroyed
by a male system," Morgan then
COMMUNICATION
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OCTOBER 22-24
RESIDENTIAL COLLEGE

She said that for a female to
participate in the male-dominated
revolutionary groups was to be
"counter-revolutionary."
"Those groups only preserve the
forms of oppression we're fighting
against," she said. "If they suc-
ceed, its a coup d'etat, not a revo-
lution."

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