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October 13, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Wednesday and Thursday-October 14th and 15th
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
Student Laboratory Theatre
presents
I RISE IN FLAME CRIED THE PHOENIX
by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS

pag4e thiree

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'trl i n

Dati1

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Tuesday, October 13,. 1970 Ann Arbor, Michgan Page Three

FUMED OAK
A
Admission Free

AND
by NOEL COWARD
RENA THEATRE
FRIEZE BUILDING
promptly at 4:10 P.M.

oeewsdrbriefs
~By The Associated Press

-

APPLE WINE,-
IS FINE
AT THE ODYSSEY DURING
APPLE WINE NIGHT-EVERY TUESDAY,
208 W. HURON
761-01 10

ann orbor film cooperative
presents
paoul .newman
Uin
cool hand luke
the greatest man since louis xiv--m.k.
t ~tonight'
tuesday, oct. 13th,
auditorium a
angel [halt

FIVE NIGHTS OF VIOLENCE and fires on the island of
Bermuda resulted yesterday in the arrest of an opposition party
leader as the British colony's 300-man police force kept watch
to stem further violence.
Frederick Wade, the public relations officer of the Progressive{
Labor Party, was one of 15 persons arrested early Sunday when police r
used tear gas to break up a 72/2-hour window-smashing spree by
some 500 persons. He was charged with obstructing justice and held'
without bail.
Although the opposition party has blamed the violence on racial,
differences, the cause is unclear.
SOUTHERN-LED SENATORS were defeated yesterday in
an effort to fuse the school desegregation issue with equal rights
for women.
The Senate rejected 57 to 17 a constitutional amendment that
would have given states an "absolute right" to sanction the freedom-
of-choice desegregationls plans that the Supreme Court has found
to be largely unworkable.
The amendment was offered to a pending constitutional amend-
ment by Sen. James Allen (D-Ala.), who said it would simply extend
to Southern states "the same privileges and immunities enjoyed by
states in other parts of the nation."
* *. *a
THE U.S. STRATEGIC AIR COMMAND sent its full Pacific
fleet of B52 bombers over Laos yesterday for a fourth straight
day, of saturation raids against the Ho Chi Minh Trail.
About 30 of the mammoth bombers unloaded 30 tons each of ex-
plosives on North Vietnamese supply depots, transfer points and in-
filtration routes running southward in the jungles of eastern Laos.
The sustained bombing campaign was timed for the onset of the
dry season in Laos'as the monsoon rains depart. In this period, the
North Vietnamese regularly step up the movement of reinforcementsr
and supplies toward their hideout bases at the trail's terminals in
Cambodia and South Vietnam.
As on the three previous days, the Strategic Air Command con-t
centrated all or nearly all its Thailand-based B52s on Laos, guiding
the high-flying bombers to targets with radar signals from the ground.r

declines ruling
'on abortion case
WASHINGTON {A - The Supreme Court declined yester-
day to decide whether expectant mothers have the right to
medical abortions in the early stages of pregnancy.
The abortion case was among scores that the Supreme
Court declined to hear. At the same time, the court agreed to
review a small handful of cases including two obscenity cases.
The court refused to hear a case from Milwaukee, Wis.,
where the state's anti-abortion law has been declared in viola-
tion of women's privacy rights by a three-judge federal court:
However, this term the justices'----
will review the District of Colum-
bia's abortion law which has been
grounds by a federal district court
here.
The Wisconsin c a s e appeared vell Q e
far more significant because the
ruling sent to the court for re-,
view spoke in terms of humanj 7
rights rather than'whether the

-Associated Press
ROBERT LEMIEUX (right), lawyer who has represented many
members of the separatist Quebec Liberation Front, listens to
Justice Minister Choquette's declaration at a televised news con-
ference Saturday. Choquette offered safe passage out of Canada
to the kidnapers of British diplomat James Cross if Cross was
released unharmed.
Quebec kidnappers
present new demand's

75 c.

7 and 9:30

75c

rn!I,. %

HELD OVER-2nd BIG WEEK
"A BEAUTIFUL A N D ENGROSSING
FILM. NOTHING SHORT OF MASTER-
LY. PURE PLEASURE.
-Judith Crist, New York Magazine
More successful than Ken Russell's inter-
esting rendition of 'Women in Love' earlier
this year." -Vogue

I'

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
presentsk
"CACTUS FLOWER"
by ABE BURROWS
October 14-17, Trueblood Theatre
Ticket Prices: $2:00 - $2.50
Box Office Open Mon. & Tues., 10 A.M.-5 P.M.;
Wed.-Sat., 10 A.M.-8 P.M.
764-5387 P.O. Box 1993 Ann Arbor 48106

1
i
r
7
l
a
7
1
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i

MONTREAL W)--Terrorist kid-
napers holding as hostages a Brit-
ish envoy ;and a Quebec minister'
gave authorities three life-and-
death options yesterday.
The federal government, fearing!
more political abductions,tmoved'
troops into Ottawa to bolster. po-
lice security for officials and for-
eign diplomats.
The Canadian French separa-
tists who seized the two hostages'
last week gave provincial author-!
ities these choices:
-If all six ransom demands are
rejected, both British Trade Com-
misoner James Cross and Quebec
Labor Minister Pierre Laporte will
be killed.:
-If two demands are met-the
release of 23 "political prisoners"
and a halt to the police investiga-
tion-Cross will be freed but La-
porte will be held under threat of
death'
-If all demands are met both
men will be released.

naped Saturday, minutes after the
provincial government refused the
ransom demand for Cross.
The kidnapers threatened to
execute the two hostages at 10
p.m. S un d a y but apparently
changed their minds after Quebec
Premier Robert Bourassa broad-
cast an appeal for negotiations a
few minutes before the deadline
fell.

Peace group plans
mass demonstrations,

The case involved Sidney Bab-
bit, a 60-year-old doctor who has
been charged with performing an
illegal abortion. Now a resident
of Hallandale, ° Fla., -his trial in
Milwaukee is scheduled for Nov.
30.
Wisconsin law permits thera-
peuticvabortions whenhnecessary
to save the life of the mother.
Otherwise abortions are criminal
offenses punishable by up to three
years in prison and $5,000 fine.
The three-judge federal court
in its ruling last March said the
state does not have the constiu-
tional power "to deny to, a woman
the basic right reserved to her
under the Ninth Amendment to
decide whether she should carry
t See COURT, Page 10

mmmmWm"NWMMmw

I

11

WASHINGTON () - The Na-
tional Peace Action Coalition said
yesterday it will hold massive
antiwar demonstrations in 31
cities including Detroit on Oct. 31,
three days before the Nov. 3 gen-
eral election.
Jerry Gordon, a Cleveland anti-
war leader, told a news conference
that the rallies and marches will
be peaceful, legal and "non-con-
frontational."
He said some antiwar groups
oppose the timing of the demon-
strations but he doesn't think the
rallies will hurt the chances of
peace candidates.
Gordon said, however, that the
people are disillusioned with the
politicians who had pledged earlier
to work toward withdrawal from
Vietnam.
They have been cowed by Vice
President Spiro Agnew, Gordon
said, and have betrayed their an-
tiwar supporters by endorsing
President Nixon's standstill cease-
fire. He said the Nixon plan leaves
intact Nixon's support for the
Thieu-Ky regime, continues U.S.

intervention in Indochina and sets
no date for withdrawing all the
troops.
The'coalition advocates imme-
diate withdrawal.
"The tragedy is that the Sen-
ate doves have hailed the speech
and called for a moratorium ,on
protest against the war," Gordon
said.
"There is no moratorium on the
killings in Southeast Asia, no
moratorium on the bombings there
and no moratorium on the Thieu-
Ky repression against the anti-
dictatorship forces."
"We don't think there is going
to be any violence. We don't think'
it's going to upset t*he election,"
said Mrs. Ruth Gage-Colby of
New York, representing the Wom-
ens International League fdr Peace
and Freedom.
"The Senate has backed off its
peace stand," she said. "The
doves . . we don't know what they
are. Chickens, anyway."
Gordon said he expected the
biggest rallies or marches Oct. 31
to be in New York City and Bos-
ton.

WASHINGTON (P) -- President
Nixon'has vetoed a bill to clamp
a ceiling on broadcast spending
by candidates for major public of-
fice, the White House announc-
ed yesterday.
The President said the bill
"plugs only one hole in a sieve."
Nixon's action was announced
on the last day he had to decide
on the measure, which cleared
Congress by wide margins.
The bill would have set a limit
of seven cents per vote cast in
the general electionor _$20,000,
whichever was .higher, as" the
spending ceiling for candidates
running for president, vice presi-
dent, Senate, House, governor and
lieutenant governors
It also would have provided that
no broadcasts could charge a n y
political candidate more than the
lowest charge paid by any com-
mercial advertiser for the same
time period and would have re-
pealed ejual time requirements for
iresident and vice president cand-
idates only.
Ii Providence, R.I., Sen. Jo h n
Pastore, (D-R.I.), sponsor of the
bill said, "I regret the action very,
very much.
"My reason for sponsoring the
bill was because I feel the strength
of our democracy depends upon
a well informed public and be-
cause of.the astronomical expens-
es involved in electronic b r o a d-
casting which is an essential and
integral part of the campaign pro-
cess. This bill was sound and
wise," Pastore said.
"From a practical standpoint,
I would be less than honest if. I
don't admit that the Republican
party is-pretty well off, financially
speaking, and this might have
constituted some of the motiva-
tion" for the veto, the Senator
said.
Nixon, in a veto message to the
Senate, said the bill does not limit
the over-all cost of campaign-
ing. "It merely limits the amount
that candidates can spend on
radio and television," he said.
Nixon also contended the bill
raises prospects of more, rather
than less, campaign spending.
National General Theatres
[OX VILLR6E
375No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300
ENDS TUESDAY
Mon.-Fri.-7:00-9:15
Sat.-Sun. 2:0O
4:30-7:00-9:15

L

.
---,

BEST STEAK HOUSE
STEAK DINNERS
NOW SERVING
At Reasonable Prices
FILET-1.59 SIRLOIN-1.53
Above includes Baked Potato,
Salad, and Texas Toast
STEAKBURGER-.79
Includes Baked Potato and Texas Toast;

i.

Barbr Yve
Streisand / Montand
On A Clear
9eFQ

217 S. STATE ST.
Next to State Theater

I

I1

PRESENTS
The Pennsylvania Ballet
OPENING THE DANCE SERIES IN HILL AUDITORIUM
Sat., Oct. 17, 8:30
PROGRAM: Ballade (Gabriel Faure); Interlude (Jacques Ibert); Figitive Visions
(Rokofie f f); and Pas de dix (Glazounov).
OTHER ATTRACTIONS IN THE DANCE SERIES:
MARTHA GRAHAM AND DANCE COMPANY. . .. Monday, October 26
'n A A XT L A XT T T ' VTT* 7 flATYTTflflr -n n a - X"* A -.. n a.. ,- - l I TT f

III

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