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September 02, 1970 - Image 34

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-02

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Page Two6w"Student Life

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 2, 197th

Page Two-Student Life THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, September 2, 1 97~

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Student-run bookstore created

(Continued from Page 1)
s t a t e educational institutions
selling books to "bona fide en-
rolled" students are entitled.
But the Regents' foremost
concern was for the store's fi-
nancial viability, and they saw
the large discounts and student
control as barriers to this sta-
bility, in spite of SGC's argu-
ments that other student dis-
count s t o r e s are financially
stable.
This was the situation in
September as SGC called for a
Diag rally and a march on the
Sept. 19 R.egents meeting to pro-
test the Regents refusal in July
to set up the store. The rally
was attended by about 800 stu-
dents, 400 of whom subsequently
entered the meeting to protest
a regental decision earlier in the
day to establish an administra-
tion-run University bookstore.
It was the University's first
large-scale disruption of a Re-
gents meeting and the Regents
were visibly shaken. There were
calls among them to adjourn the
session, but the students domi-
nated the floor as they explained
their disagreements with the
regental plan.
In the plan, the Regents
stipulated that the store would
be controlled by the vice presi-
dent and chief financial officer,
with students serving in an ad-
visory role. Students found this
immediately unacceptable, in
clear opposition 'to their belief
in student power.
Secondly, the regental pro-
posal stated that the Univer-
sity's schools and colleges-not
SOC - should sponsor a second
referendum to approve the fee
assessment.
The provision was added be-
cause a number of Regents be-
lieved that the SGC referendum
only reflected the views of the
minority of students who had
voted and therefore unfairly
bound the s t ude nt body into
paying for the assessment.
But student leaders believed
a second referendum unnces-
sary.
They contended that the
second. vote would destroy the
validity of the initial referen-
dum and, more importantly, be-
lieved it would undermine the
right of SGC to poll the stu-
dents it represented in the fu-
ture. Additionally, they did not
recognize the right of the ad-
ministration to dictate policies
to'students, and believed that
Council - not the schools - was
the duly-electedamechanism to
sponsor referenda.
The opposition to this section,
however, played second fiddle to
the students' abhorence of ad-
ministration .c.o n.t r o 1 of the
store. It was this section that
paved the way for a major con-
frontation.
Several SGC members organ-
ized a rally with the tacit -pur-
pose of taking over the Admin-
istration Bldg. The first day the
turnout was poor and the
building locked. The second
time the protesters tried, they
encountered more success.
A large crowd attended an
early afternoon rally and
marched this time into the only
available main building - the
Literature, Science and Arts
Bldg. The crowd, which was
close to 700, decided to stay as
President Robben Fleming an-
nounced the building was clos-

ing as usual and the demon-
strators, if they did not leave,
would be served with a tem-
porary restraining order enjoin-
ing them from continuing the
sit-in.
The restraining order was
obtained, but when Ann Arbor
Police Chief Walter Krany at-
tempted to serve it around 10
p.m. he was shouted down and
blocked from entering the build-
ing to read it, as the law stipu-
lates, to the protesters inside.
The University later dropped
the injunction.
Around 3:30 a.m., state and
Ann Arbor p o l i c e m e n with
Washtenaw County Sheriff dep-
uties-called at the request of
Fleming-arrived at the build-
ing and ordered the people out-
side to clear out in five min-
utes. Almost immediately after
the order was given, the police
charged the crowd as they en-
tered the building to arrest the
107 remaining people. Nine per-
sons were injured.
The 107 were charged with
creating a contention-a rather
vague crime which is a misde-
meanor and carries a maximum
penalty of 90 days in jail and/or
a $100 fine.
Trials for the 107 students
arrested in the LSA sit-in lasted
through the summer, and pro-
ceedings arising out of the
arrests are still going on.
However, the completion of
the remaining trials will not sig-
nify an end to the incident. As
of the beginning of April, 48
of those students convicted were
appealing the convictions, and
16 had not yet been sentenced.
As expected, a noon Diag rally
was called following the arrests,
and an ad hoc coalition was
formed to organize a campus-
wide strike for that Monday.
However, the strike fared poor-
ly, with class, attendance down
only about 10 or 20 per cent in
the literary college, and other
schools were largely unaffected.
At the same time, though,
faculty m e m b e r s - generally
alarmed by the arrests and the
presence of police on campus-
sought to allay the situation.
The f a c u I1t y decision-making
body, Senate Assembly, called
on its executive committee, the
Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs (SACUA) to
meet with students on the issue.
And at the first meeting
SACUA indicated informal sup-
port for the controversial con-
cept of a student-faculty con-
trolled bookstore. SAUA and
the members of the coalition
and SOC hammered out a new
proposal, with several changes
emerging f r o m Council's orig-
inal plan.
The most important change
altered the funding arrange-
ments. Instead of financing the
store through a $1.75 fee assess-
ment, as SGC originally pro-
posed, the new plan called for
a $5 rolling assessment to be
returned at the donor's request.
This sidestepped the question of
holding a second referendum,
which the students opposed and
the Regents had called for. Now,
a second referendum was com-
pulsory as there was a new
assessment-creating a constant
reservoir of money-that had to
be voted on by students.
A campus - wide referendum,
coordinated by SOC but with
polling booths in the schools,

would be held to determine stu-
dents' willingness to be "assess-
ed." Students would be bound by
the. total vote - which over-
whelmingly supported the crea-
tion of a student-run bookstore
funded by the rolling $5 assess-
ment.
The new plan, which had
garnered the support of leading
faculty members, was presented
to the Regents at their October
meeting. The Regents voted 5-3
to establish a bookstore along
the lines that the plan recom-
mended, but with two condi-
tions:
-That the University would'
be isolated from liability from
any debts the store incurred;
and
-That it would qualify for
the exemption from the four per
cent state sales tax.
Although the former condi-
tion was fulfilled by a legal
opinion issued by a Detroit law
firm, the latter is presently up
in the air, due to bills pending
in the state Legislature.
The Regents approval of the
bookstore, with student control,
was based on several different
factors. In the view of Regent
Lawrence Lindemer (R-Stock-
ridge) who cast the deciding
vote, the crucial factor was the
addition of the section isolating
the University from financial
liability. Thus, w h i1e students
would run the store, the Uni-
versity could not be held ac-
countable for any p o t e n t i al
losses.
And there was also the sup-
port that faculty members gave

to the store. No longer was the
issue just the product of a group
of students in the minds-of=the
Regents; now it was supported
by a number of prestigious lac-
ulty members.
There was also the intrinsic
importance of the building take-
over, for its "shock value". is
believed to have put some ;pres-
sure on the administration to
adopt a proposal more concilia-
tory to students.
Whatever the reason's, the
University will have a bookstore
-located in the ; Union-this
fall, although textbooks may not
be sold until the winter term.
Perhaps the most important
result of the bookstore issue was
the realization a m o n g faculty
members that new avenues of
communication between them-
selves and students had to open.
Following the bookstore issue's
conclusion, SACUA has taken a
more active role in campus
issues, involving itself in ,dis-
cussions on control ove' the
budget and the fate of other
referenda, and it has generally
made itself more accessible to
students.
In addition, there is a regular-
ly-scheduled open meeting prior
to each regental session to give
students and professors an op-
portunity to air their views with
the Regents.
To radicals, the issue did
m o bilize and "radicalize" a
number of students.
And to moderates in the stu-
dent body and the administra-
tion alike, the University now
has a discount bookstore.

INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS, 1970-1971

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JEAN MARTINSON, Conductor
MELBOURNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA . .. .99.. Saturday, October 24
WILLEM VAN OTTERLOO, Conductor (Program in recognition of
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LOS ANGELES PH ILHARMONIC
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ZUBIN MEHTA, Conductor
EMI L GI LELS, Pianist ..,,........... . Wednesday, November 18
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MENUHIN FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA.......... Wednesday, March 10
YEHUDI MENUHIN, Conductor and Soloist
MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, Cellist9. .,. . ..... Monday, March 15
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