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October 10, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-10

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page three

the
CalethdaP
Every MONDAY:
Football Night, color TV
happy hour prices
Every TUESDAY:
Apple Wine Night-reduced prices
THURSDAY, OCT. 8:
MERLI N
9:30-1 :30-Women half prices
F R I DAY, OCT. 9:
LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-1 :30

4 P

i i ttn

Batt#

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, October 10, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

newsbriefs
By The Associated Press

SATURDAY, OCT.
LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-1 :30

1O:

FORD MOTOR Co. announced yesterday it is raising the
prices of its 1971 cars an average of $167 over the average 1970
prices.
The price-raise represents an average increase of $14 per car over
previously announced hikes.
"The adjustments reflect changes in competitive market condi-
tions," the firm said in a statement accompanying the new prices.
When Ford first announced its 1971 prices on Sept. 17 it warnedj
that revisions might be made later. A similar disclaimer was not
included in the latest price announcement even though the com-
pany still faces wage increases from the United Auto Workers
which is attempting to write a pattern-setting agreement at General
Motors.
THE ITALIAN SENATE adopted an historic divorce bill
yesterday leaving only minor amendments to be acted on before
divorce becomes legal in Roman Catholic Italy.
The crucial Senate vote was 164 in favor of the legislation and
150 against, with no abstentions. Required majority was 158.
It carried Italy past a milestone in its 100-year existence as a
unified nation by putting both houses of parliament on record for
the first time as having voted for the introduction of divorce.
The dramatic roll-call ballot overrode the objection of the coun-
try's largest party, the Christian Democrats, and defied the opposi-
tion of the Roman Catholic Church.t
The flood of divorce requests from those whose cases fit the
limited requirements of the proposed law could bring the marriage
court system to paralysis, lawyers said.
WHOLESALE PRICES rose five-tenths of one per cent
in September, the government reported yesterday.
The increase is the third largest monthly jump this year, ex-
ceeded only by increases in January and July.
The report indicated further trouble for Nixon Administration
hopes of a continued easing of the nation's worst inflation in 20
years.
It said prices for both food and a broad range of industrial raw
materials rose higher last month than had been estimated in an
earlier preliminary report by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
An August drop in wholesale prices and a two tenths rise in
living costs, smallest in 20 months, had prompted White H o u s e
predictions that its battle against inflation was being won.
Living costs have eased off in recent months to a level of 5.7
per cent above a year ago, compared with an annual rate of 6 per cent
or more earlier in 1970.
SECRETARY OF TRANSPORTATION John V o I p e yes-
terday ordered a sweeping investigation of the air charter industry
and the way the Federal Aviation Administration regulates it.
Volpe said the probe was prompted by the 30-death disaster in the
crash of a rented Wichita State University football plane in the
Rockies Oct. 2.
The FAA has said it warned both Wichita State and another
school two months ago against patronizing the small firm flying
the plane - but took no action to stop the firm itself.
Volpe bypassed the FAA in ordering the probe and put it directly
under control of his office.
He named a newly appointed aide, Adm. Willard Smith, to
conduct the investigation.

Rogers criticizes
Soviet tactics i~n
Mideas t situation
WASHINGTON (D - Secretary of State William P. Rogers
accused Russia yesterday of resorting to the strident rhetoric
of the cold war in its dispute with the United States over
charges of Mideast cease-fire violations.
The alleged violations of the cease-fire military stand-
still, Rogers said, are supported by conclusive U.S. evidence
and he added:
"We are convinced beyond a doubt that Soviet personnel
are there to assist in the construction and manning of those
antiaircraft missile sites."
He will present "evidence of they-

-Associated Press
Secretary of State Rogers speaks to reporters
THREE UNITS REBEL:
Bolivia's Torres may,
act against army

LA PAZ, Bolivia (P)-Leftist
President Juan Jose Torres
threatened military action yes-
terday against three military
units that rose against him and
vowed to prevent a, Bolivian
takeover "by extremists."
The Ingavi Regiment and the
National Military School in La
Paz and the Manchego Regi-
ment in the southern city of
Camiri announced their opposi-
tion to the Torres government
Thursday. Their forces were es-
timated to total about 1,500 men.
Torres labeled the rebels, led
by Col. Miguel Ayoroa, as trait-
ors and gave them until noon
Friday to give up. The deadline
passed with no report of action.
Armed forces units loyal to
Torres were under orders to use
armed force if necessary to put
down the rebellion. Ayoroa forces
replied that they were ready to
repel any attack.
The Torres government took
over after ousting a three-man

right-wing junta Wednesday.
The junta had been installed by
Gen. Rogelio Miranda, who on
Monday led a military coup that
ousted President Alfredo Uvando
who had taken over in a similar
coup Sept. 26, 1969.
Despite the air of crisis, Tor-
res named 16 military men and
civilians to his Cabinet in a
move aimed at winning wide
support for his left-wing na-
tionalist government.
Speaking at a ceremony when
his new cabinet was sworn in,
Torres declared Bolivia is now
part of the "revolutionary Third
World."
"The revolutionary govern-
ment," he added, "will main-
tain and improve its relations
with all countries on our con-
tinent, with the Socialist nations
and other areas who may wish
to strengthen their relations
with us and to cooperate in the
effort for our national libera-
tion and development."
National General Theatres
FOH VILLa6E
375 No.MAPLE RD.-7694300
ENDS TUESDAY
Mon.-Fri.-7:00-9:15
Sat.-Sun.-2:00
4:30-7:00-9:15
Barbra Yves
Streisand / Montand
On A ClearP4
IS* Foe

violations" to Soviet Foreign Min-
ister Andrei Gromyko when t h e
two meet in New York, probably a
week hence, he said.
"As far as the Soviet Union is
concerned," Rogers told the news
conference, "we're disappointed-
disappointed not only in the mis-
sile sites in the 50 kilometer zone,
which must have been deployed
~with, if not the active participa-
tion, certainly with the knowledge
and consent of the Soviet Un-
ion - we are disappointed in the
rhetoric that they are using, rhe-
toric which is reminiscent of the
cold war days, very strident in
tone."
"The violations have made it
more difficult to start up Israeli-
Egyptian peace talks under U.N.
auspices,"hRogers said.
"And the situation, God' knows,
is complex enough. It has been
going on for 20 years."
"On the other hand the fact
is that both sides now seem to be
wiling to extend the cease-fire for
another 90 days. And there also
are many indications that t h e
parties would like to end the con-
flict." In the conflict, Rogers ar-
gued, everyone suffers, the eco-
nomic price is high and "it is a
no-policy - it is desperation."
Also speaking of the Middle
East, Foreign Secretary S i r Alec
Douglas-Home said yesterday
Russia has converted its navy in-
to a long-range offensive force,
already operational in the Medi-
terranean and likely soon to be-
come so in the Indian Ocean.
The British statesman was wind-
ing up a noisy debate on world
affairs at the annual convention ofj
the ruling Conservative party and
he drew cheers when he said em-
phatically: "It is not safe, whe-
ther it be in the Mediterranean
now or in the Indian Ocean soon,
to leave the Communists as un-
disputed masters of all military
activity in an area where vi t a 1
British interests lie."
Douglas-Home's statement was
made during a vigorous assertion
of Britain's right to safeguard its
vital interests within the frame-
work of a distinctively national
foreign policy.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
ity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 'y mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

!i

Solzhenitsyn
USSR -hitfs
Nobel choie
MOSCOW 0P)-The Soviet gov-
ernment publicly deplored yester-
day the awarding of the 1970
Nobel Prize for Literature to Alex-
ander Solzhenitsyn.
The 52-year-old R u s s i a n
author of three novels, only one
of which was allowed publication
in his country, was in seclusion
working on his fourth novel and
did not comment on publication of
an official condemnation in the
government newspaper Izvestia.
Noting that Solzhenitsyn was
expelled from the Soviet Writers'
Union in November, 1969 for
"work and behavior which came
into conflict with the principles
and tasks of the voluntary asso-
ciation of Soviet writers," the
statement implied he had no hope
for rehabilitation as a result of
being offered one of the world's
top literary awards.
Solzhenitsyn should have no
trouble getting an exit visa to
receive his $80,000 prize in Stock
holm. At the time of his expulsion,
the Writers' Union told him he
could leave the country anytime.
But he could very well be denied
permission to return to the Soviet
Union, and this might make him
change his mind about accepting
the prize.
Solzhenitsyn has a deep com-
mitment to his country and views
his role as a conscience of Soviet
society.
DIAL 662-6264
At State & Liberty Sts.

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A perfectly made jewel of a movie. Both pleasurable
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FLAWLESS, FASCINATING, IMPECCA-
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--LOS ANGELES TIMES
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GD.GH.Lawrexe's
THE VIRGIN AND THE GYPSY

I

11

Amovieas
Anerian as Mods
apple pIeDaddys
Scach-on-the
roc a lde
Maxiels hang-ups.

OPEN 12:45
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.
Feature 20 min. later

I

.1

rlie's gone crazy over
>rs. In soft suede to
hten up your season..
go crazy over Charlie
color up a pretty you.
AAST'S
SHOES
619 E. LIBERTY

--
fr
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' " c~

Color Prints by Moviclab A CHE RON Pictures Release:a division ofCinecom Corporation
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Joseph ELavie pesents
An ArranEmbassy Fdm

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