100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 09, 1970 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Teri

THE MICHIGAN-DAILY

Friday, October 9, 1970

Page Ten THE MICHIGANDAILY Friday, October 9, 1970 4

GUEST LECTURER:
Commager links U.S.',history
to classical ideals and values

SDS defense asks

I1- - -

r

By ROSE SUE BERSTEIN
Over 300 persons heard Henry
Steele Commager, noted historian
and professor of history at Am-
hert College, speak yesterday on
"The Uses of History."
"There is no one philosophy of
history," he said, "but a particular
use each people selects for its own
history."
Whereas Europeans could look
to medieval man for inspiration,
Americans had no such obvious
predecessors and turned instead to
the classical tradition, he added.
Commager noted the strong at-
tachment the founding fathers
had to ancient history.
"Our founding fathers," he said,
"knew the ancient world better
than the modern world." They
drew upon classical antecedents
for their governing institutions,
developing Republicanism from
R o m e, and Federalism from
Daily Official Bulletin
(Continued from Page 5)
Film Series: "Boris Godunov", Multi-
purpose Room, Undergraduate Library,
7 and 9 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Language Test: College En-
trance Exam Board tests (CEEB) given
in French, German, Russian, Spanish,
Oct. 13, 7 p.m., in Rackham Lecture
Hall. Registration required by Oct. 12.
Rm. 1014 Rackham. F o r m s available
from Language Secretary. Admission
to the examination open only to those
who have registered and received ad-
missions ticket. Bring I.D. or Social
Security Card.
All students in School of Education
(Undergraduate): Preclassification for
Winter Term 1971 is in, progress andj
will run to Nov. 25 Pick up material in
2000 School of Education Building. Ear-
ly registration will take place December
7-18. Students who advance classify and
do not early register will lose reserve
places and must reclassify at Waterman
Gym in January.
' Representatives from Law School of
Notre Dame Univ. will be avail. to talk
to students interested in attending
law school, Oct. 15. Make appointments
at Preprofessional Desk, 1223 Angell
Hail.

Greece; they imitated persons of
antiquity; they emulated classical
morals, he continued.
No other country has so com-
pletely sought to embrace the
classic ideals of government, he
said. He noted Plato's concept of
philosopher-kings as an example.
Goethe and Gibbons, he said, were
given no political power, but Ad-
ams, Jefferson, and Madison, too
cerebral to have ruled any other
country, succeeded each other as
President. And, he added, "per-
haps they should be revived."
Of the Founding Fathers, he
said, "only Tom Paine wouldn't
have been comfortable in a toga."
He likened Ben Franklin to Solon,
Aaron Burr to Catiline, and cited
"their scorn of luxury, austerity,
preference for rural life, and Ci-
ceronian eloquence" as reminis-
cent of classical culture.
Still, Commager noted, three
paradoxes appear in studying the1
classical influence on early Amer-
ica.
"America played no role in t h e
(archeological or intellectual) re-
discovery of the ancient world,"
he said. Rather, they borrowed and
exploited ancient history for justi-
fication of their conduct, for plea-
sure, and for consolation.
Then, Commager continued, "It
seems extraordinary that America
should return to such a universal
experience in forming a new na-
tion, a unique, particular artific-
ian contrivance."
And, he added, America w a s
dedicated to change, - to revolu-
tion - not to the timeless class-
ical scheme of stability, order and
reason.
Revolutionary American had two
historical philosophies, he c o n-
tinued, the classical, retrospective
view of John Adams, and the pro-
gressive, prospective view of
Thomas Jefferson.
Adams insisted upon an elabor-
ate series of checks and balances
so as to enable the United States
to escape its destiny, the tendency

I
:
,
k
i
t
'i
E
E
L
f
k

of government to become tyranni-
cal. Jefferson, Commager said,
maintained that history is n o t
exhaustive, and that a unique
country could arise.
"No people were more clearly
indebted, to the past than our
Founding Fathers. Still, they were
able to emancipate themselves,'
Commager concluded. "They were
creatures of the past, but they
triumphed over it."
Inj unction
Sought for

smissaof charge
By MARK DILLEN ing as attorney for the defense,
Legal arguments for the dism~is-I immediately launched into the
sal of charges marked last night's first of a series of planned mo-
session of the trial of Students for thn for dsial-hich ocssied
a Democratic Society before the the entire three-hour session.
Central Student Judiciary (CSJ). A ruling on the motion for dis'-
missal was delayed until the next
The trial arose from charges by session next Wednesday.
the Engineering Placement Coi- Mogill's motion argued that the
mittee and the Engineering Coun- cs gis ihr eda
cil that members of SDS violated should be dropped because trial
the Student Government Council
"disruption" regulation during the against him constituted "double
lock-in of a DuPont recruiter Jan. jeopardy," since Feldman was con-
29 in West Engineering Bldg. victed on 9ivil charge of "conten-
-tion" stemming from the same in-
The regulation, which forbids cident.
"acts that destroy property, in- Feldman Csconvicted Apri
terfere with free movement or 23, in District Court and is cur-
cause disruption of needed condi- rently on six months probation
tions of work," carries a possible after serving a ten day sentence.
fine of $250 and a four month Adsitn day setencei
suspension of privileges if a stu- In addition, Mcgill cited civil
dent organization is found in vio- law which says that a trial cannot
lation. If individuals are charged be held in a case after a final
and convicted, they may receive decision has been reached in a
fines up to $50 court of law on the same charges.
Three individuals, Richard Feld- "But this law works both ways,"

PRESENTS
L'Orchestre National Francais

4i

t
i

JEAN MARTINON, Conductor
in HILL AUDITORIUM
MONDAY, OCT. 12, 8:30

PROGRAM:
SYMPHONY NO. 4 ... Schumann
"TILL EULENSPEIGEL" . R. Strauss
MUSIC FROM "CYDALISE" . . Pierne
LA VALSE......... .....Ravel

TICKETS:
$7.00-$6.50-$6.00-
$5.00-$3.50-$2.50

at
UNIVERSAL MUSICAL SOCIETY, BURTON TOWER, ANN ARBOR
Office Hours: Mon.'thru Fri. 9 to 4:30; Sat. 9 to 12 (Telephone 665-3717)
(Also at Auditorium box office 1'/ hours before performance time)

State game
(Continued from Page 1)

L

i;J

- ~ .-, a

stadium materially affect ana
annoy individuals in their use of maWlimScsndJre
annoyidiir ity eir"Goldberg, as well as SDS itself, are
their own property.'" named as co-defendants in the
To support the request for in- name s ds
junction, the complaint refers to ase.
affidavits signed by residents of Last night's meeting marked the
Washtenaw County. beginning of the presentation of
The affadavits are similar to the defense. Kenneth Mogill, act-
those used in the injunction that,
recently stopped a proposed Goose
Lake rock festival. On the basis of
complaints registered after a H P! 4
three-day music event at Goose I- I
Lake during the summer, an in-

countered plaintiff lawyer Peter
Forsythe. "This trial represents a
new opportunity for Feldman to
be charged. If the court rule 'dou-
ble jeopardy' it will prevent a new
fact determination."

Studio

junction banned a second festival.
Referring to the Oct. 3 Michi-
gan-Texas A&M game, there are
affidavits charging that there was
"excessive litter and noise, as well
as poor sanitary conditions in the
stadium area, during that event,"
and that "the traffic both before
and after the football game was
a hazard."

121 W. Washington

668-7942

presents
GARRARD
the finest in record changers

{-
uf
I.,su iEferenIimJ n*il.uL.
OThe National Brewing Co. of DetroU, Michigan. Also Baltimore Miami " Phoenix
N'*A*y PARY

77--l

SINGLES
CAN YOU ACCEPT OUR INVITATION?
Newman Grad Supper
$1.00
October 11-6:00 P.M.
Newman Center Basement

SMARCIA WIS(Hhistologic technican in
U-M Medical School
TO M V ER N IE R -"r aduae o s to uent
to U-M, Board of Regents
Socialist Campaign Committee Meeting
Tues., Oct. 13 7:30 P.M. 1518 S.A.B.

r'

*1

t

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan