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October 08, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 8, 1970

Nixon calls for cease-fire in war

(Continued from Page 1)
there should be safeguards against
violations.
He put his suggestion in these
terms:
"I propose that all armed forces
throughout Indochina cease firing
their weapons and remain in the
positions they now hold.. This

would be a 'cease-fire-in-place.' It
would not in itself be an end to
the conflict, but it would accom-
'plish one goal all of us have been
working toward: an end to the
killing."
Through diplomatic channels,
the Soviet Union was given ad-
vance word earlier in the day of

t]
IV.
p
n
v1

Reaction to Nixon plan
enthusiastic in Senate

WASHINGTON (P) - Republi-s
cans and Democrats on Capitolf
Hill greeted President Nixon's
Vietnam speech last night with(
enthusiasm, using such phrases asE
"fair . . . bold . . . comprehensive3
the acid test for Communistc
credibility."e
"I thought it was an excellentr
statement," said Senate Demo-
cratic Leader Mike Mansfield, who
has been a persistent critic of the
President's Indochina policies.
"I approve of it," said Mans-
field. "I will do my very best to
support it."I
Republican Leader Hugh Scott
of Pennsylvania said Nixon "has
written a new chapter in the dip-
lomatic history of the United
States with his bold move to end
this unpopular war,,to establish
peace in Southeast Asia and to
reach a political settlement...
Sen. John Sherman Cooper, a
Republican member of the Foreign
Relations Committee who spon-
sored legislation that would have
cut off funds for fighting in Cam-
bodia, said Nixon's immediate pro-
posal "is comprehensive and fair.".
The immediate stopping of all
warfare and killing and the ex-
change of prisoners of war are
humane and difficult to be re-
fused before the world," Cooper
said in a statement.
The President's pl for elect-
ions, he added, provides "oppor-
tunity for representation by all
parties and for the necessary
settlement in all of Indochina."
Sen. Frank Church (D-Idaho),'
a cosponsor with Cooper of the
bill to cut off Vietnam money
said, "I applaud the President's
message and warmly endorse his
plea for the immediate release of
all prisoners of war. His several
proposals constitute the most
promising formula yet advanced
for achieving a negotiated settle-
ment of the war in Indochina."
South Vietnamese government
spokesmen declined immediate
comment on President Nixon's new
Indochina peace plan but a mem-
ber of the political opposition was
enthusiastic. There were expres-
Agree-m ent
reaehed at
Oakland U.
(Continued from Page 1)
classroom building, saying it
would make the situation "too dif-
ficult to allow negotiations to
continue effectively."
Some 55 students attended a
mass rally at noon in front of the
student center and discussed how
best to support the blacks who
were sitting-in. Some students
were willing to lend their support,
but others said they wanted to
know what the demands were
first.
As a vote was about to be taken,
word came that anagreement be-
tween the university and BSA had
been reached. O'Dowd and Ap-
pleton arrived a few minutes later,
and told the group that all but a
few "minor detafls" had b e e n
agreed upon. O'Dowd said the de-
mands were "legitimate, creative
and centered around educational
matters."
However, when asked for details,
O'Dowd said, "We simply have
not had enough progress in the
negotiations to make a statement
at this time." The statement is
expected to be released some time
today.

sions of incredulity and pessimism U
from the first GIs interviewed.
National Assembly Deputy Ngo C
Cong Duc of the opposition to theti
government said, "I've waited two it
years for Nixon to make this kind S
of concrete proposal. It's definitely w
a step in the right direction. We ti
need more such steps from b o t h
sides. ,,
0 d
IP
church sit-in 11r
continuesn
(Continued from Page 1j
Stringfellow, an Episcopalian,
joined the sit-in briefly Monday
at First Presbyterian, saying that
it was time the churches aided the
blacks and the poor by selling
church properties and buildings, if
necessary.
Conversing with First Presbyte-
rian congregations in the lounge
after joining the sit-in, Stringfel-
low said that reparations are a
traditional remedy when one
group has wronged another.
Twenty-five local congregations
have formed the Interfaith Coali-
tion of Congregations in response
to the BEDL-WRO campaign and
sit-ins, to work for the county's
poor and disenfranchised.
The coalition has established a
committee to design a program
for meeting the needs of the coun-
ty's poor, with cost estimates.!
However, BEDL has "zero con-
fidence in the coalition," according
to a BEDL spokesman who em-
phasized that self-determination
for the poor is basic to BEDL and
WRO.
"If you want to talk about peace-
ful revolution, peaceful change,"
says BEDL vice president Hank
Bryant, "then the church is the
last institution we can try."
"There are a lot of brothers and
sisters watching Ann Arbor, Bry-
ant says. "It's happening here. If
it work here, then we've got a
model for the entire nation."
Robert Gault and James P.
Feeney, juniors in the law school,
have won first-place honors in the
school's annual Henry C. Camp-
,ell Moot Court Competition.
They were chosen by a panel oi
five judges over David Kalberer
and William Scharf. The f o u r
finalists, working in teams, argued
a hypothetical case arising from
the enactment of legislation which
provides for the purchase of se-
cular education by a state from!
a private sectarian school
Judges 'included U.S. Supreme
court Justice Byron R. White;
Judge Wade H. McCree Jr., of the
U.S. Sixth circuit Court of Ap-
peals" Justice John R. Dethmers
of the Michigan Supreme Court,!
and Dean Francis Allen and Prof
Paul Kauper of the U-M Law
School.
The four finalists receive cash
prizes and their names will be en-
graved on a plaque in the Law
School.
FREE INSTRUCTIONS
UNION BILLIARDS
10 AM.-NOON SAT.
BILLIARD CLINIC
WED., OCT. 14, 7:30 PM.

he general content of Nixon's ad-
dress. And officials recalled that
ast April Deputy Soviet Foreign
Mfinister Jacob Malik talked ap-
provingly of a possible new Ge-
neva conference to deal with the
Vietnam war.
Nixon said "the essential ele-
ments of the Geneva accords of
1954 and 1962 remain valid as a
basis for settlement of problems
between states in the Indochina
rea" and that the United States
would accept agreement reached
by those nations.
The White House official who
riefed newsmen indicatedathe
Jnited States believes a larger
conference should bring together
hose nations having the greatest
nterest in promoting peace in
Southeast Asia. He said it would
seem logical that the Soviets might
want to be present and declared
he United States certainly would
not oppose such a development.
Nixon did not hold out any
promise of further speeding with-
drawal of American troops fromI
Vietnam, merely sticking to al
previous pledge that by next
spring more than 260,000 men will
have been pulled out-"about one-
half the number in South Viet-,
nam when I took office."

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 8
Day Calendar
Physics Lunch Seminar: D. Winter,
Introduction to Holography and Holo-
graphic Aberrations," P&A Colloq. Rm.,
112 noon.
Nuclear Colloquium: J. Reidy, "Se-
lected Topics from the Banff Summer
School on Intermediate Nuclear Phy-
sics," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 p.m.
Center for Coordination of Ancient
and Modern Studies Lecture: H e n r y
Steele Commager, Amherst, "The Usesi
of History": Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4:10
p.m.
Slavic Languages and Literatures and
Center for Russian and East European
Studies Lecture: Prof. Frantisek Mares,
U. of Vienna, "Constantine's Concept of
Savlic (Moravian) Culture": Aud. B.
Angeli Hall, 4:10 p.m.
Botany Seminar: Dr. R. C. Allen,
Ortec Inc., "New Techniques for Highj
Resolution Electrophoresis in Acryla-
mide Gel," 1139 Nat. Sci. Bldg., 4:151
p.m.I
University Players: "The Caucasian
Chalk Circle," Trueblood Theatre, 81
p.m.
Astronomy and Space Films: "The
Legacy of Gemini", "The Universe
from Palomar", "Apollo 8", and an
excerpt from Walt Disney's 1956 "Man
in Space". Rm. 126, East Quad, 9 p.m.
Placement Service
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Michigan Civil Service trainee j o b
applications accepted only until. Oct.

12. Special Job announcements listed
from time to time may be applied for
throughout the year. They recruit only
in the spring: will be a new trainee
announcement by Feb. Ask for Mich.
Civ. Serv. Booklet at Career Planning,
3200 S.A.B.
U.S.I.A. representative will be avail-
able to speak to students Mon. p.m. and
Tues., Oct. 12, 13 about Foreign Serv.
Ex,:mand all positions in agency, in-
cluding radio-tv and journ. work. Call
763-1363 for appts.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Baratin Coffee Hour, every Thursday.
Next time, Oct. 8, 3-5 p.m., Frieze Bldg.
Room 3050. Open invitation to all peo-
ple interested in French language and
culture.
New Republican Coalition meeting,
Oct. 8, 8:00 p.m., 3R Union, speaker:
Mr. Jackson Worsham, "The Common
Groundof Conservatism and Libertar-
ianism."
Christian Science Organization, Oct.
8, 7:30 p.m. 3545 SAB. Regular Meeting:
All are welcome.
* * * *
Gay Liberation Front. General meet-
ing, 3-C Union, 8:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct.
8.
Central Student Judiciary Hearing,
Thurs., Oct. 8, 7:30 p.m., Room 3540
SAB, Engineering Placement Advisory
Committee, et al., v. Students for a
Democratic Society, et al.
Baratin Coffee Hour, every Thursday.
Next time, Oct. 8. 3-5 p.m., Frieze Bldg.
Room 3050. Open invitation to all peo-
ple interested in French language and
culture.

-Associated Press
Torres victory
Gen. Juan Jose Torres, arm upraised, addresses his followers from the government palace in La Paz,
Bolivia, yesterday after defeating a rightist military group in a struggle for control of the govern-
ment. Torres p-omised the crowd "a popular nationalist government." See story, Page 3.

PHASE JE DIMENSIONS

NO STUPID CUPID
But don't get us wrong, because we're ALL desires, tendencies, attitudes, and honest self- advantage ofI
HEART - we just haven't lost our head! Until evaluation. come your ow
this new dating approach, developed by Phase The guess work and hit-or-miss results of other No one can fir
III Dimensions, computer match programs were programs have been eliminated through the form And no one b
based upon socio-economic facts and superfi- included below. your search so
cial interests rather than on the participant's So if you're really looking for compatibility, take

this personality approach and be-
wn match-maker.
nd your match better than -you can.
ut Phase IlIl Dimensions can make
o much easier, more successful.

1

USE ANSWER BLOCKS BELOW. MANY QUESTIONS ARE BASED ON A 5 POINT SCALE. SEE ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS.

1. MY SEX IS (1) Male
(2) Female
2. MY RACE IS (1) White
(2) Black
(3) Latin-American
(4) Oriental
(5) Other

DATE'S RACE CAN
3. White
4. Black
5. Latin-American
6. Oriental

7.
8.

Other
MY RELIGIONI

BE
(1) Yes (2) No
(1) Yes (2) No
(1) Yes (2) No
(1) Yes (2) No
(1) Yes (2) No
IS (1) Protestant
(2) Catholic
(3) Jewish
(4) Other
(5) Non-denominational
(6) Atheist

DATES RELIGION CAN BE
9. Protestant (1) Yes (2)1
10. Catholic (1) Yes (2)1
11. Jewish (1) Yes (2)1
12. Other (1) Yes (2)1
13. Non-denominational (1) Yes (2)1
14. Atheist (1) Yes (2)1

No
No
No
No
No
No

15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.

MY AGE IS (Enter years directly)
YOUNGEST DATE (Enter years directly)
OLDEST DATE CAN BE (Enter years directly)
MY HEIGHT IS (Enter inches directly)
SHORTEST DATE (Enter inches directly)
TALLEST DATE (Enter inches directly)
I AM (1) Single
(2) Widowed
(3) Divorced

26. MY DATE'S EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
SHOULD INCLUDE AT LEAST
(1) Some high school
(2) High school degree
(3) Some college
(4) College degree
ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS
For each of the following questions there are two
answer blocks. One is for the answers which de-
scribe you, and one is for the qualities (answers)
that you would like your ~date/match to have.
Also, MOST OF THESE QUESTIONS ARE
BASED ON A FIVE-POINT ANSWER SCALE,
the answers for which are shown as (1) . .. (5).
Of course, any number of 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 may be
used as an answer. 1 and 5 are the extremes, and
an answer of 3 would be themidpoint or aver-
age. NOTE: If it is not important how a date/match
should answer any of the following questions,
mark YOUR DATE's box with an "X". Do not
mark an "X" in any of the answer blocks for YOU.
27. MY BUILD IS (1) Light...(5) Heavy
28. I AM (1) Attractive..(5) Unattractive
29. I LEARN (1) S'owly...(5) Quickly
30. MY COMMON SENSE IS (1) Poor,.,
(5) Excellent
31. MY VERBAL FLUENCY IS (1) Poor..,
(5) Excellent
32. I AM USUALLY (1) Sullen...(5) Cheerful
33. 1 AM WITTY (1) Seldom...(5) Often
34. 1 AM USUALLY (1) Spontaneous..
(5) Deliberate
35. MY FEELINGS ARE (1) Easily hurt...(5) Not
easily hurt
36. MY AMBITIONS ARE (1) Modest...(5) Great
37. I AM USUALLY (1) Deceptive...(5) Straight-
forward
38. MY SELF-CONFIDENCE IS (1) Weak...
(5) Strong
39. MY PERSONALITY (1) Suggests indiffer-
ence...(5) Radiates enthusiasm
40. 1 AM USUALLY (1) Pessimistic...(5) Optimistic
41. IAM.(1) Naive...(5) Sophisticated
42. I AM (1) Blunt.:.(5) Polished
43. I AM (1) Introverted...(5) Extroverted
44. I AM USUALLY (1) Decisive...(5) Indecisive
45. I LIKE TO LIVE (1) Carefully...
(5) Adventurously
46. MY FINANCIAL BACKGROUND IS (1) Poor
...(5) Rich
47. l DESIRE TO MAINTAIN A (1) Modest
monetary standard of living . . . (5) High
monetary standard of living.
48. MARIJUANA PROHIBITION (1) is unreal-
istic . .. (5) should be strongly enforced.
49. MY DATE MAY SMOKE MARIJUANA
(1) True ... (5) False

51. I WOULD CONSIDER PRE-MARITAL SEX
(1) Immoral in all cases...(5) Always moral
for consenting adults
52. I WOULD CONSIDER PARTICIPATING IN
PRE-MARITAL SEX (1) Under no circum-
stances...(5) As a normal occurrence in a
dating situation
53. I AM SEXUALLY (1) Inexperienced...
(5) Experienced
54. I AM SEXUALLY (1) Shy...(5) Aggressive
55. I DRINK BOOZE (1) Never...(5) Frequently
56. 1 SMOKE (1) Never...(5) Like a smokestack
57. I JOIN PROTEST DEMONSTRATIONS
(1) Never...(5) Often
I PARTICIPATE IN THE FOLLOWING PASTIMES
58. Parties and nightclubs (1) Never.(5) Often
59. Sports/Outdoor activities (1) Never.(5) Often
60. Aesthetic pursuits (1) Never. (5) Often
61. Passive activities (1) Never. (5) Often
62. I AM POLITICALLY (1) Liberal (2) Conserv-
ative (3) Independent
63. THE MAJORITY SHOULD RULE (1) Un-
questionably ...(5) Never
64. FREE SPEECH SHOULD NOT BE RE-
STRICTED IN ANY MANNER (1) True...
(5) False
65. FOR THE PRIVILEGE TO SPEAK MY MIND
THRU A NATIONAL PUBLICATION I
WOULD PAY AS MUCH AS
(1) Nothing
(2) 25e per word
(3) 50c per word
(4) $1.00 per word
(5) $2.00 per word
66. DISCRIMINATION SHOULD BE
(1) Anybody's prerogative
(2) The majority's prerogative
(3) Regulated for the best interests
of the majority
(4) Regulated as best determined by the
majority
LIFE'S PROBLEMS WOULD BE SOLVED TO
WHAT DEGREE BY THE FOLLOWING:
67. MATERIAL WEALTH (1) AlI...(5) None
68. ACCEPTANCE THAT ONE SHOULD NOT
DEMAND ANYTHING FROM ANOTHER
(1) All...(5) None
69. DEVOTION TO THE QUEST OF ANSWER-
ING THE REASON FOR MAN'S EXISTENCE
(1) All...(5) None
70' SPIRITUAL DEVOTION AND RELIANCE
UPON A SUPREME BEING
(1) All...(5) None
71. RESTRICTING POPULATION GROWTH
(1) All. .. (5) None
72, DOING ONLY WHAT ONE BELIEVES IS
,MORALLY RIGHT(1) All ... (5) None

4

4pi

22. DATE CAN BE

(1) Single
(2) Widowed
(3) Divorced
(4) Single or widowed
(5) Single or divorced
(6) Widowed or divorced
(7) Any

y''

23. 1 AM

(1) Conventional/Traditional
(2) Mod/Modern
(3) Progressive

24. DATE CAN BE

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
(5)
(6)

Conventional/Traditional
Mod/Modern
Progressive
Conv/Trad or Mod/Modern
Mod/Modern or Progressive
Any

25. MY EDUCATIONAL BACKGROUND
INCLUDES (1) Some high school
(2) High school degree
(3) Some college
(4) College degree

'12

IFI

r

THINKING
STEREO?
4THINK
QUALITY
j McINTOSH, SONY, GARRARD, KLH,

50. THE CURRENT VIETNAM POLICY IS
SATISFACTORY (1) True ... (2) False
APPLICATION AND ANSWER FOF
Be certain you have read instructions above.

i'

COPYRIGHT 1970 PHASE iII DIMENSIONS, INC.
A

I

Enter only one digit per block, except in blocks 15 thru 20 for which you must enter
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17

one digit
18 19

on each side of the tick mark.
20 21 22 23 24 25 26

ANSWER
BLOCKSLi

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1

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I If

aI

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1

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1

L A i e c

27 28 29

30 31 32 33 34 35 36

37 38 39

40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49

You
Your Date
You

50 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71 72

Your Date

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