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October 08, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4'

page three

121 W. Wai

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Sictgitan

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Hi-Fi Studio

Thursday, October 8, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

shington

668-7942

features

soNv
the most respected name in
HIGH FIDELITY.COMPONENTS

nBeTws briefs
By The Associated Press

Leftist military

officers sweep

to

power in Bolivian

conflict

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I
A NEW NARCOTICS BILL, hailed as a keystone in Presi-
dent Nixon's anticrime program, was passed by the Senate
yesterday.
The bill gives the Justice Department broad new powers to
combat illegal narcotic trafficking and clamps new restrictions on'
the import, export, manufacture and sale of drugs.
The Senate refused for the second time to approve an amend-
ment by Sam Ervin (D-N.C.) removing the authority for the "no-
knock no warning" narcotics raids from the bill.
THE SENATE began debate yesterday on a proposed equal
rights amendment to the Constitution.
The amendment, approved in the House by a 350 to 15 vote in
August, provides that equal rights shall not be denied or abridged
under state or federal law because of sex.
Supporters of the bill say it is designed to end the treatment of
women as second class citizens. The proposal has been before Con-
gress for 47 years.
LEGISLATION TO CONTROL waste dumping in the oceans
will be sought by President Nixon from the next Congress it was
announced yesterday.
The Council on Environmental Quality, which recommended this
policy to the President, told newsmen it is being announced now to
"put industry and municipalities on notice that this is the policy to-
ward which we are heading."
The council recommended a ban on ocean dumping of material
known to be harmful and said that dumping of potentially harmful
materials at sea should be phased out.
* * *
THE AFL-CIO CLAIMED yesterday that a "potential con-
flict of interest" will occur if Sidney P. Marland becomes U.S.
commissioner of education, launching an all-out attack on hisE
nomination.
Marland is presently president of the Institute for Educational
Development. The AFL-CIO said this job is aimed at securing major
school contracts for expensive educational materials.
THE DEADLINE for the ransom of a British diplomat
kidnapped by French separatists has been extended to noon
today.a
James Cross, British trade commissioner in Montreal, was kid-
napped Monday by the Quebec Liberation Front (FLQ). The FLQ is
demanding $500,000 in gold bullion and the release of 21 men they
term political prisoners.
A note from Cross saying he is in good health accompanied the
deadline extension. His fate had been unknown since yesterday
noon, when the previous deadline expired.
BOSTON'S NEW ARCHBISHOP, the Most Reverend Hum-
berto S. Medeiros, was installed yesterday in a tradition-filled
Mass.
The new archbishop replaces Richard Cardinal Cushing, who
retired from the post after 26 years. Cushing, 75 and ailing, and
three other cardinals were among thethousands of participants and
spectators who filled Holy Cross Cathedral.
Archbishop Medeiros, the son of a Portuguese immigrant, is
particularly well-known for his work among the poor and Mexican-
Americans in the Southwest.

LA PAZ, Bolivia (R) - Leftist Gen. Juan Jose Torres
swept to power yesterday with a show of force that toppled his
rightist opponents. He promised cheering crowds that as
president he would give Bolivia "a popular nationalist govern-
ment."
Gen. Rogelio Miranda, the conservative army chief of
staff who forced President Alfredo Ovando Candia to resign
Tuesday, was said to have taken refuge in a foreign embassy
along with two members of his junta.
Torres' government appeared to have solid support from
students, farmers, workers and powerful segments of the
armed forces.
Bolivia thus followed the pattern of a leftist military
regime that took over in Peru .in 1968. Chile's president-elect

-Associated Press
Frank Jones, former Black Panther, testifies
House committee tol
Panthers' new aims

is Salvador Allende, the f i r s t
Marxist to be elected in Latin
America. Bolivia, Peru a n d
Chile are bounded by Argen-
tina, Paraguay and Brazil,
where military rightist re-
gimes are in power.
Ten leftist demonstrators were
reported killed in a mining town
by military officers in the only
known bloodshed of the two-day
conflict.
Ebullient Torres' supporters, in-
cluding students and workers,
raced through La Paz, sacking the
homes of military men and civi-
lians suspected of being rightist
and occupied the buildings of
three leading newspapers.
In a speech to cheering crowds,
from the balcony of the govern-
mental palace after taking t h e
oath, Torres declared his was "the
revolution of the people, w h o
manifest their unwavering will to
take the route of national libera-
tion."
Torres said his government
would rest on four pillars, the
peasant farmers, the workers, the
students and the armed forces.
All will be invited into the new
regime, he added.
"We have won and the people
have overcome their executioners,"
Torres said.
Students and workers occupying
the three important daily news-
papers, proclaimed their decision
to convert them into "cooperative
newspapers in defense of popular
aspirations."

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THURSDAY, OCT. 8:
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FRIDAY, OCT. 9:
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WASHINGTON (P)-The Black)
Panther party has changed itsI
emphasis from fighting racism to
fighting capitalism, a former edit-
or of the Panthers' newspaper
testified yesterday.
The target shift occurred, Frank
B. Jones told a House subcommit-
tee investigating the Panthers,
"because they came to feel capital-
ism is the over-all problem thatl
causes racism.".
Jones, 31, operator of a book-
store in Richmond, Calif., joined
the party in May 1968 after con-
versations with Huey Newton, hej
said, "because I felt it was doing
something that needed to be done
-combatting racism."
He left the party in May 1969,
Jones related, "because it was no
longer emphasizing racism; it
started opposing capitalism." s
Whe then Panthers changedj
"from a paramilitary, self-defense
organization to a political party,"
he said, "there was a party purge7
to remove anyone who didn't make
an attempt to understand the
political motives."
Asked by Rep. John M. Ash-
brook (R-Ohio), about cartoons
in the paper depicting police -
drawn -as pigs - being knifed in
the back, Jones said:
"I consider cartoons political
satire. For instance, you might
have one saying, 'Stamp out lit-
terbugs' and showing a giant foot1
ready to come down one. That]
doesn't mean go out and stampi
the next litterbug you see."
Ashbrook also brought up a

slogan which appeared in the
paper: "The only good pig is a
dead pig."
"A pig being a policeman who
conducts h i ms e l f improperly,"
Jones replied, "that's like saying
'the only good polio germ is a dead
polio germ.'"
Jones acknowledged that al-
though no longer a member of the
party he remains sympathetic to-
ward the Panthers.

Tougher
Egyptian
stand seen,
By The Associated Press
Egypt's National Assembly nom-
inated Acting President Anwar
Sadat for a full six-year term as
president yesterday and pledged
the new leadership would follow
the policies of Gamal Abdel Nas-
ser.
However, there were indications
in Cairo and elsewhere that Nas-
ser's successors w e r e taking a
tougher 'line toward the United
States and Israel than the late
Egyptian president took.
In Beirutnnewspapers oftboth
the right and the left noted a
tougher Egyptian stance.
Diplomats there expressed the
belief that it may be too early
to assess the first acts and state-
ments of the new Egyptian lead-
ership, and that the new leaders
could be reacting to internal
pressures in taking an initial
stance that appears more militant
than Nasser's.
The semiofficialaCairo newspa-
per Al Ahram said Sadat told
U.S. Secretary of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare Elliot L. Rich-
ardson that Egypt is prepared to
consider a limited renewal of the
cease-fire if U.N. mediator Gun-
nar V. Jarring of Sweden "re-ac-
tivates his mission."
The current 90-day truce ex-
pires Nov. 5. Jarring has flown to
Moscow to resume his normal dip-
lomatic duties there, but has said
he would return to New Y o r k
about the middle of this month.
The Egyptian paper said Sadat
told Richardson that Egypt re-
jects all claims of missile move-,
ments in the truce zone in viola-
tion of the agreement. It quoted
the Egyptian leader: "The first
and foremost thing is that no-
body asks us to withdraw a single
missile f r o m the front because
that is completely unacceptable.
At the United Nations in New
Y o r k, a British spokesman ex-
pressed concern over the U.S. de-
cision to pull out of deputy-level
talks to establish guidelines for
a Middle East peace. The talks
among the United States, Britain,
France and the Soviet Union
should continue "and be seen to
do so," a British spokesman said.

DOORS OPEN DAILY AT 12:45
* STARTING FRIDAY *

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Ride Switchboard finds
transportation for students

By CHUCK WILBUR
In an effort to provide rides for
students in the Ann Arbor area
lacking transportation, the Han-
nan Vaakuna League, an Ann Ar-
bor commune, is operating t h e
Ride Switchboard.
T h e switchboard serves as a
cost-free clearing house for ride
information. Students n e e d i n g
rides or riders may call the switch-
board, where information is co-
ordinated and rides are set up.
Those offering rides may stipu-
late if they want rides to share
expenses or driving.
League members decided to es-
tablish t h e switchboard after
hearing the idea of a telephone
ride service discussed at a meeting
of the Ann Arbor Tribal Council,
a coalition of local radical groups.

The goal of the switchboard, ac-
nording to league member Andy
Perl, is to "eliminate the other
ride boards around t h e campus
which have become too cluttered
to be useful."
According to another League
member, the switchboard has. set;
up over 150 rides of both long and
short distances since it began op-
erating September 18.
T h e switchboard is, especially
concerned with providing ride
service to Ypsilanti, says Perl. Ef-
forts are being made to contact
commuters between Ann Arbor,
Ypsilanti, and Detroit in order to
set up rides on a permanent b'asis.
The Ride Switchboard's num-
ber is 769-5290. It is open from
12 noon to 8 p.m. weekdays and
from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Satur-
day and Sunday.

t SATUR DAY,
LEAVES OF
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OCT.
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