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October 07, 1970 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-07

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ann arbor film cooperative
general meeting
tonight
wed nesday, oct. 7th
8:00 p.m.,
union room 3-d
all those interested
are urged to attend

page three

4Q

"trl igttn

3aty

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, October 7, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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ANNOUNCING
Cold Beer and Wine
NOW AVAILABLE
at
convenient Food, Mart
ON NORTH CAMPUS (next to Lums)
OPEN EVERY NIGHT 'TIL MIDNIGHT
* I
If you want to have a baby
that's your business.
If you don't, that's ours.
We're a nonprofit family planning agency with physician super- *
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Send for full details.
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CHAPEL HILL, N.C. 27514
* Gentlemen: Please send me full details without obligation:
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news briefs
By The Associated Press
THE BLACK PANTHER PARTY has established ties with
"foreign revolutionary groups such as Al Fatah," the Palestinian
guerrillas, according to a House committee investigator.
A study of the Panther's official newspaper indicates the party's
ties with Al Fatah "have gone beyond the talking stage," investi-
gator Stewart Pott told a subcommittee of the House Committee on
Internal Security.
A most important recent trend, according to Pott, is that
the Panthers "are'reaching out more and more for support and
assistance to anti-U.S. forces overseas."
KNOCKING $2 BILLION out of the Pentagon's annual
money bill, the House Appropriations Committee approved
$66.7 billion yesterday and said the country has every right to
expect "formidable military forces" for that.
It approved all $1.1 billion authorized for the Safeguard anti-
missile system and an extra $415 million for Navy ships but trimmed
$1.5 billion off development and purchase of other military weapons
systems.t
It approved all $358 million asked by the administration to boost
the combat readiness of South Vietnam forces.
House action on the billl, trimmed from President Nixon's re-j
quest for $68.7 billion, is scheduled to start Thursday morning and
a vote is expected before the end of the week.
Criticizing Pentagon money management for the second year{
running, the committee said "the critical times ahead" require the
Defense Department to tighten its operations.r
FOREIGN MINISTER MAHMOUD RIAD of Egypt expressed
willingness yesterday to extend the Middle East cease-fire by 90
days after it expires Nov. 5 but he ruled out any withdrawal of
missiles from the Suez Canal truce zone as the United States
and Israel demand.
At the same time, Egypt's ruling political party declared that
the struggle against Israel "must be escalated in all fields" and called
for a strengthening of relations with the Soviet Union. The party,
the Arab Socialist Union founded by Gamal Abdel Nasser, met
in Cairo to ratify Anwar Sadat as Nasser's successor as president.
In New York, the United States told the other three big powers
at the United Nations it is pointless to talk about guidelines for a
Middle East peace until Egypt pulls back the anti-aircraft missiles.
But Riad, talking on television in Cairo, declared the missiles were
placed in the canal zone before the cease-fire went into effect
Aug. 7 and that none would be withdrawn.
Filbert nut board
prie: $204d5,339
I Tr I

Fighting erupts
t
In Bolivia
LA PAZ, Bolivia (1?) - Civil war broke out between leftist
and rightist military forces yesterday in Bolivia where Latin
America's master insurrectionist, Ernesto "Che" Guevara, was
slain three years ago.
Leftists bombed the presidential palace and raked armed
forces headquarters with machinegun fire. The battle was
triggered by the resignation of leftist President Alfredo Ovan-
do Candia.
The air force, supporting leftist Gen. Juan Jose Torres,
launched six planes in a 15-minute attack on the presidential
palace, and the small military,

-Associated Press
GEN. ALFREDO OVANDO CANDIA, accompanied by armed
guards, leaves his home in La Paz, Bolivia yesterday to seek asylum
in the Argentine Embassy. Gen. Ovando quit as Bolivian president
yesterday triggering a civil war between right and leftwing groups.

STEADILY RISING COSTS:
Strike against GMI
enters fourth week
DETROIT (/P) - The strike of the GM strike has been mx
against General Motors entered mal, limited many cases to sh
its fourth week yesterday with its ages of new cars at the GM d
costs - already in the millions of erships.
dollars daily - mounting stead- Louis Corsi, tax administr
ily and with layoffs spreading to in Cleveland, estimated the si
supplier firms, trucking com- will cost the city $35,000 to $4(
panies and others. a month in lost income taxel
Effects of the strike were being The strike could create see
felt over much of the Midwest, problems in Indiana, James M
with the greatest impact in Michi- is, the state's revenue com
gan, where GM facilities are con- sioner, said yesterday.
centrated.
The Indiana Employment
An illustration of the effects is urity Division reports unemp
the demand among families of the ment compensation is being
striking United Auto Workers to 36,533 this week, compare
(UAW) for food stamps. 11,970 during the comparable
Reed Thrift, head of the Wayne a year ago.
County federal food stamp pro- - ----
gram, says he had to add 100 ad-
ditional employes and create two
special offices to dispense theiRan
stamps to strikersinthe Detroit e l
area. There are an estimated 80,-
000 strikers in Detroit alone, and WASHINGTON (P)-Wit
he estimated 7,000 persons were ing by and with a stack
receiving the stamps by yester- in byadwtasac
day guns and grenades on the w
Under the plan, a striker with panel was told yesterday a
a family of five can pay $23 for threatens the lives of all law
stamps that will purchase food "I don't think there is a
worth $58 every two weeks. Weatherman faction of S
The union has instructed mem- Panthers are engaged in;
bers to apply for food stamps and Charles O'Brien, Californi
welfare benefits to supplement general, told the Senate Ii
their strike benefits which range committee.
from $30 to $40 a week. O'Brien, holding up what
About $105 million remains ly confiscated 45-caliber s
from the $120 million that was in police in his state are incr
the strike fund when the strike recent large scale thefts of
began at midnight Sept. 14. A to-
tal of 403,141 GM employes were from the arsenals of military
idled by, yesterday, 343,121 of "The quantity of these,
them on strike and the rest laid unknown private hands r
off. spectre of a situation inS
N o n e of the nonunion white literally outgunned," O'Brier
collar workers at GM has been a mortar could do to a p+
laid off, the company said, but O'Brien and other policf

nini-
nort-
deal-
ator
trike
0,000
s.
rious
ath-
mis-
Sec-
ploy-
paid
d to
week

garrison occupying it replied
with antiaircraft fire.
Rightist Gen. Rogelio Miranda,
who led the revolt against Ovan-
do on Sunday, arrived atthe pal-
ace after the attack and castig-
ated Ovando for "permitting ex-
tremism."
He denounced recent guerrilla
activity in the northeast - which
all but ceased after Bolivian
troops killed Guevara in October
1967 - and pledged to p ut it
~down.Guevara, Fidel Castro's
right hand man in the Cuban rev-
olution, had embarked on a cam-
paign of revolutionizing Latin
America.
Leftist troops followed up the
palace bombing with a machine-
gun attack on armed forces gen-
eral headquarters, Miranda's com-
mand post,
Torres' forces claimed to have
taken Bolivia's second largest city,
Cochabamba.
Groups of university students in
the capital declared themselves'
for Torres and a government that
would be ",nationalist, of the left
and with participation of workers
and students."
Miranda named a military triu-
mvirate loyal to him. He decided
to remain in the background with-
out an official title.
Ovando sought asylum in the
Argentine Embassy.
A group of a ir force officers
loyal to Ovando answered Miran-
da immediately by declaring Tor-
res, who was eased out as com-
mander of the armed forces 2%/
months ago "president of the rev-
olutionary committee."

BAM hits
high school
officials
Black Action Movement (BAM)
issued a statement Monday night
sharply attacking the administra-
tion of Ann Arbor's Pioneer High
School for its alleged failure-to
implement demands made by
black students at the school for
increased hiring of black faculty.,
Two years ago, the statement
says, black students at the school
first presented the demands, and
last year, it continues, the school's
principal committed himself to
their implementation.
But, the statement claims, "to
date, the principal has failed
to implement the demands, but in-
stead summoned heavily armed
police to stifle and intimidate the
students who were gathered in
peaceful assembly." This refers to
events leading up to the disrup-
tion which occurred at the school
last Tuesday, in which classes were
dismissed early and some parts of
the school were damaged b'y black
students.
BAM, the statement concludes,
"strongly supports the Pioneer
High School students in their just
demands for securing quality and
relevant education."

WASHINGTON (A)-Rest easy.
taxpayer, your federal Filbert
Control Board is hard at work.
In these times of emphasis on
law and order, the nuts must be
controlled. And filberts are nuts.
So - you have a Filbert Con-
trol Board.
The board ; has a part-time
manager, a secretary a n d nine
members who, in the words of
one government official "meet
when they need to."
The Filbert Control Board's
budget for this fiscal year is es-
timated at $25,339. The govern-
ment says they expect this ex-
pense to be covered by an as-
sessment rate of two-tenthsbof a
cent per pound of assessable fil-
berts, according to a notice pub-
lished in the Federal Register last
weekend.
Assessable filberts are defined
as those with shells.
The board isn't much worried
about filberts without shells. Most
of them come from Turkey.
American filberts - mostly as-
sessable - come from Washing-
ton and Oregon, which produce
about 8,000 pounds of them year-
ly.

"We try to allocate the supply
to meet the domestic demand for
use of filberts in bags of mixed
nuts," s a y s George Eastman,
specialty corps branch chief at the
Department of Agriculture.
The price of filberts, Eastman
says, is about 55 cents a pound.
And the board, made up of
growers and processors who are
reimbursed for expenses but no
salary, works in Portland, Ore., to
keep prices constant. That is what
the Filbert Control Board does.
Eastman has a little difficulty
explaining exactly what a filbert
is.
"Well, they're brown and kind
of round," he begins. ". . . They-
're a little meatier than almonds.
They're closer to peacans, b u t
still not exactly like pecans. I'd
say filberts have a little sturdier
taste than almonds or pecans and,
oh, I'm a little at a loss for words
right now."
But he h a s no difficulty ex-

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bold

of

conspiracy

h armed police stand-
of mortars, machine
itness table, a Senate
national conspiracy
officers.
any question that the
DS and the Black
a conspiracy today,"
a's deputy attorney
nternal Security sub-
he said was a recent-
;bmachine gun, said
easingly worried over
arms and explosives
posts.
weapons and guns in
aises the continuing
which the police are
n said. "Imagine what
olice station."
e witnesses said they
ech protected by the
stitution can no long-
reaching of the over-
the giving of detailed
bombs or assassinate
general of Maryland

and head of the National Association of Attorneys
General, testified that instructions on how to am-
bush police officers printed in a Black Panther
newspaper were almost identical in detail to an
actual attack in Baltimore in which one policeman
was killed and one wounded.
O'Brien said there has been a 100 per cent rise
in the number of police killings in California in
1970, with 15 law officers murdered in the first
7% months of the year.
Assault on police have increased 350 per cent
from 1967 when there were 362 prosecutions for
such attacks of 1969 when there were 1,215 such
cases.
O'Brien said the political coloring of terrorisms
has changed from the far right in the early 1960s
to the far left presently.
"While . much of this problem is politically
motivated I should note that there are indications
that violence against police is also a result of an
increasingly violent atmosphere, and growing dis-
respect for life which seems to affect our nation,"
O'Brien said.
He said the violence and the resulting public
terror is intended to provoke repression as the
seed bed for successful revolution.
As an example, he said attacks have spread
from the police to firemen who he said some
California militants now call "firepigs."

plaining why there is a demand employes who quit or retire are
for filberts, and thus a demand not being replaced while the strike
for the Filbert Control Board. continues.
"I like 'em personally," he says. In many other states the effect

believe the freedom of spee
First Amendment to the Con
er be used to justify the pr
throw of the government or1
instructions on how to make
police officers.
Francis Burch, attorney

w

Shop Jacobson's Mon.-Tues.-Wed.-Sat. 9:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
Thurs. and Fri. 9:30 A.M. to 9:00 P.M.
the intriguing stitch
of India imported in
terrific tote to swing
your shoulder. It's a
young-idea multi-col
± cotton bag decorate
embroidery and tiny
reflecting circles.
10x102 inches. $8.

~Co
Ou
00 0
0 9(d -Flsoor)
_____ (pastry (OE THEREj

4>

ENDS TODAY
Open 12:45 p.m.
Shows at 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.
at State & Liberty Sts.

®t ~J COLOR by Deli eUn - -rtst
LADIES 75c FROM
1-6 P.M,. WEDNESDAYS

hery
n a
from
bgred
ed with

I

STARTS TOMORROW!
"AT LAST AN HONEST FILM"
-Detroit Free Press

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.
DIAL 8-64 16
ENDING TONIGHT
Today at 1, 3, 5,7, 9 P.M.
"IF IT DOESN'T
GRAB YOU
WHERE YOU
LIVE, YOU
AREN'T ALIVE."
-Van Nuys News

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"Likely to Strike You as Truthfully
Done and Satisfying!
An intelligent piece of work,
There are scenes one doesn't forget!"
-PENELOPE GILLIAT, New Yorker
GD.GH.GLawreice's
THE VIRGIN AND THE GYPSY

S

A.
movie
as,
American
as Mom's
apple pie,
Daddy's
Scotch-
on-the-
rocks
and little
Maxie's

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.. - - ' .

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