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October 06, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

BEST STEAK HOUSE
STEAK DINNERS
NOW SERVING
At Reasonable Prices
F ILET-1.59 SIRLOIN-1.53
Above includes Baked Potato,
Soalad, and Texas Toast

page three

tr4ArtAkp
gttn

tttl

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Page Three

Tuesday, October 6, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

Sadat chosen

to succeed

Egypt's Nasser

STEAKBURGER-.79
Includes Baked Potato and Texas Toast .
217 S. STATE ST.
Next to State Ttheater
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
presents
CACTUS FLOWER"
by ABE BURROWSt
OCTOBER 14-17
8:00 P.M.at
Trueblood Theatre
TICKET PRICES: $2.00 to $2.50
662-9405
P.O. Box 1993 Ann Arbor, Mich. 48106

CAIRO OP) - Anwar Sadat was designated
Monday by leaders of Egypt's only political party
to succeed Gamal Abdel Nasser as president in
a move apparently aimed at avoiding a divisive
power struggle.
The nomination by the all-powerful executive
committee of the Arab Socialist Union was tanta-
mount to election of the 52-year-old Sadat, who
has been serving as provisional president since
Nasser died last Monday.
Sadat was considered by many observers to
be the least controversial of several contenders
for Nasser's job. He was named vice president by
Nasser last year in a governmental shakeup.
They were old friends, Sadat having joined Nasser
in the coup that toppled King Farouk 18 years
ago.
As president, Sadat will have the task of bal-
ancing the left and right wings of the Egyptian
regime, which Nasser succeeded in doing.
The left is identified with Air Marshal Ali

Sabry, a member of the executive committee who
voted for Sadat. He is known for his close ties
with Moscow.
Zakaria Mohieddin, a former interior minister
who holds no official post at present, is considered
to be right-leaning and pro-Western mainly be-
cause he advocates freer economic policies to at-
tract foreign investment.
When Nasser submitted his resignation follow-
ing the disastrous defeat by Israel in the 1967 6-
day war, he personally named Mohieddin as his
successor.
Sabry and Mohieddin had been considered the.
two top contenders for the position vacated by
Nasser's death.
Sadat was host to Soviet Premier Alexei N.
Kosygin and other world leaders who attended
Nasser's funeral Thursday. Emotional, excitable,
and a fierce nationalist, Sadat was completely
loyal to his dead friend and leader, Nasser.
Most observers doubt he will be able to fill the

heroic roll that Nasser apparently had won with
the Arab masses, but no doubts are expressed or
his devotion to the independence and dignity of
Egypt.
Sadat collapsed on the day of Nasser's funeral
and Cairo's official Middle East News Agency
said he had suffered a heart attack. A govern-
ment spokesman said later, however, that he was
in excellent health.
Sadat, a devout Moslem, is the son of a Suda-
nese mother and an Egyptian father. He speaks
English well. His wife is half-English.
He was graduated from the Egyptian Military
Academy and served in the signal corps until he
was arrested and twice imprisoned of plotting
against British rule.
Sadat was reinstated in the army in 1951 and
joined the officers' conspiracy that led to Farouk's
ouster the next year.
Shortly after the coup Sadat was named di-

rector of army public relations and managing
editor of Al-Gomhouria, the Arab Socialist Union's
newspaper.
In 1954 he was named interior minister but
then dropped out of the Cabinet in 1956.
He made a comeback in 1958 as secretary-gen-
eral of the National Union and two years later
became speaker of the National Assembly.
The unanimous nomination by the union's
eight-man executive committee went to the party's
150-member central committee.
An offical party statement said the executive
committee recommended that the National As-
sembly meet in formal session Wednesday to en-
dorse Sadat and that a national referendum be
held Oct. 15. The president would be sworn
in two days later. In the referendum, the only
choice the voters would have would be to approve
or disapprove the man named by the party and
the assembly.

I

news briefs
By The Associated Press

NY hostages
released after

_ IkII'
presents
the R.F.D. BOYS

III

STONIGHT

15c

TONIGHT
761-1451

1421 HILL

'- 1

THE MUSICAL REVOLUTION
HiAiRI
BROADWAY WILL NEVER BE THE SAME!
Box office open: Mon-Fri 9:30.8:30pm; Sat till 10pm; Sun 12-5pm
Tickets also available at all major 1 L. HUDSON stores
For Groun Rates: Call Carol High 836-3719

NEW FIGHTING broke out in northern Jordan yesterday
between government troops and Palestinian guerrillas, according
to a guerrilla communique issued in Beirut.
Jordanian army sources said earlier that the guerrillas has begun
to withdraw from the northern cities, but a new agreement allowed
their militia and supplies to remain.E
PRESIDENT NIXON ended his five-nation European tour
yesterday with a swing through the showery Irish countryside.
In Dublin a handful of dissenters threw eggs and other objects at
his car from an otherwise applauding and cheering crowd.
President Nixon arrived at Andrews Air Force Base last night.
THE CHILEAN CHRISTIAN DEMOCRATIC party condi-
tionally committed its congressmen Sunday night to Marxist
presidential candidate Salvador Allende.
A constitutional amendment must be passed guaranteeing that
Allende's government will respect Chile's democratic system, for
Allende to receive the needed support.
The 75 Christian Democratic votes in the 200-member congress
would assure election for Allende.
BOLIVIAN PRESIDENT Alfredo Ovando Candia apparently
weathered an attempt by the army chief of staff to overthrow
him Sunday.
"I want neither war nor bloodshed, but I am here to rule the
destiny of the nation," the president told a crowd Sunday night.
Gen. Rogelio Miranda demanded Ovando's resignation in aj
Sunday morning broadcast, charging that the Ovando govern-
ment "has frustrated the hopes of the people and the armed forces."
* * *
GREECE'S MILITARY RULERS received $168 million worth
of military equipment from the United States in the last three
years, despite the United States' publicly proclaimed selective
arms embargo against that country.
Defense Department spokesman said that some of the aid had
been to shore up NATO, although the United States took the action
unilaterally and did not consult any NATO allies.

Lindsay

NEW YORK (R) - After an ultimatum from Mayor John
Lindsay, prisoners yesterday released the last of 32 hostages
they seized during riots at five New York City jails. A hand-
ful of inmates still held out in one jail, including nine Black
Panthers on trial on charges of conspiracy to bomb and
murder.
Inmates are demanding lower bail, speedier trials and
better prison conditions.
The Panthers were among a band of 35 barricaded on
the top floor of the Long Island City detention center. They
were said to want their lawyers present to insure against any
mistreatment after surrender.

A HELMETED PRISON GUARDI
yesterday while two others try to
the Long Island City Jail.
FIRST CASE:
My Lai tri
FT. HOOD, Tex. (AP) - After 22t
years of investigation and charg-t
es in the alleged My Lai massacrec
of Vietnamese civilians, the first
trial in the case is scheduled to1
begin today.
However, there is a strong pos-
sibility that the court-martial of
Staff Sgt. David Mitchell will be
moved to another Army post. The
defense is expected to file a mo-

1

order

""" "

SALE ENDS SATURDAY,
TOMMY
THE WHO Sr

OCTOBER 10
MAE WEST
ORIGINAL
)UND TRACKS

ann arbor film cooperative
PRESENTS
WARREN BEATTY
IN
ARTHUR PENN'S
MICKEY ON.E
SHORT: A FILM BY BUSBY BERKLEY
75c-7 and 9:30-75c
TONIGHT-Tuesday, Oct. 6th

-Associated Press As Lindsay threatened to send
hits a prisoner with a nightstick in 500 riot-equipped police and
m grab him in the courtyard of corrections officers, most of the
othier 338 prisoners in the Long
Island City facility surrendered
four days after they took control
of the jail. They gave up the last
three of the seven hostages they
originally held.
" " The mayor and Corrections
Commissioner George Mcgrath
thadpromised no reprisals against
any of the inmates.
tion for change on the ground However, one holdout at t h e
that a new panel from which the Long Island City Jail shouted to
members of the court are to be newsmen through a bullhorn,
selected includes two colonels "Mayor Lindsay has lied. The
whose selection raised objections guards are beating inmates merci-
by the military judge in the case. lessly in the courtyard. They said
Mitchell, 30, is charged with as- if they came down peacefully, the
sault with intent to-commit mur- inmates would not be beaten, but
der. The Army accuses him of they're getting beaten half to
shooting "about 30" South Viet- death."
namese civilians during an attack Newsmen from a vantage point
on the hamlet of My Lai 4, March above the courtyard said they saw
16, 1968. a number of prisoners beaten and
If convicted, he couli be sen- kicked by guards.
tenced to 20 years at hard labor, The uprisings began at midday
aishonorabledischargelandfor-last Thursday at the century-old,
feiture of all pay and allowances, red-brick facility at Long Island
Mitchell pleaded innocent and City.
has denied seeing any massacre.
See olirOhvnee r Friday, the rioting spread
Seven soldiers have. been or- tothe Tombs, the men's detention
dered court-martialed in the case, center in Manhattan, the Kew
including Mitchell's platoon com- Gardens detention center in
mander, 1st Lt. William L. Cal- Queens, and on Saturday to a
ley, 27, of Miami, Fla. A pretrial Brooklyn jail.
hearing for Calley is slated to Early Sunday, prison guards
resume Oct. 13 at Ft. Benning, Ga. with clubs and tear gas battled
into the Kew Gardens and Brook-
lyn prisons and regained control.
About 200 inmates and a dozen
guards were injured.
"AN IMMENSELY RO
STYLE AND CRITICA
Virgin And The Gypsy' is
its goals!
17 A BEAUTIFUL AND
NOTHING SHORT C
PLEASURE. Fascinating s
sual Yvette. Joanna Shim
and memorable life in a
remarkable talent. She b4
romanticism of girlhood w
jQ ination of young womanh
A J'~~ "'A finely made film. Alit
etched portrait of the quie
erotic daydreams in her eye
Nero's snake-eyed gypsy,
"No story-and no film-be
absolutism than 'The Vir
its boundaries is sown thes
-the familial conventions
annealing force of sex.,A
D.H.GLawe'rLces
THE VIRGIN AN
{"$ I I

Cambodians
stop' attack
on highway
SAIGON (-) - Cambodian gov-
ernment troops beat off yesterday
the heaviest Communist attack so
far on Phnom Penh's lifeline
highway to the sea.
But the vital route - Highway
4 to the nation's only deepwater
port at Komgpong Som - along
with at least four other major
highways remained closed.
And, 47 miles north of Phnom
Penh, government troops w e r e
forced to retreat from a village
under Communist attack.
The fresh fighting in Cambodia
came as the country's National
Assembly and Senate voted unan-
imously yesterday to end the an-
cient monarcy and install a West-
ern-style republic in its place.
The republic will be proclaimed
Friday and will go into effect
Nov. 1.
The change apparently will have
little immediate effect on life in
Cambodia, now ruled by a mili-
tary regime headed by Gen. Lon
Nol as premier.
The Lon Nol junta took over
March 18 when the chief of state,
Prince Norodom Sihanouk, w a s
deposed i.n a bloodless coup while
he was out of the country. He is
now living in exile in Peking.

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THURSDAY, OCT. 8:
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ith the conviction and imag-
OOd -JudithCristNew York Magazine
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