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September 02, 1970 - Image 29

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-02

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Wednesday, September 2, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wolverine Sports-Page Five

Wednesday, September 2, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wolverine Sports-Page Five

Icer
By JOEL GREER
Despite the fact that the play
of the Michigan hockey squad
last season resembled the un-
easiness of the stock market's,
fortunes this past summer, the
enthusiasm of t h e, hockey
crowds at the frequently sold-
out Coliseum was only surpas-
sed at t he Michigan Stadium
Saturday afternoons last fall.
The icers, featuring a rather
inconsistant team last season,
hope to bring their veteran
squad up to the championship
caliber of their fans in the up-
coming season ahead. An ex-
perienced crop of forwards and
defensemen along with a sea-
soned goaltender in Karl Bag-
nell should make the difference
in the 1970-71 team.
Last season the icers exper-
ienced a number of mountains
and valleys as they struggled to
a 14-$ overall record including
a 2-1 pasting by Wisconsin in
the Western Collegiate Hockey
Association playoffs.
The final contest featured a
strong Michigan defense coup-
led with a porous offense; a
complete reversal of the entire
season. Michigan hockey coach

aim

Daily-Thomas R. Gopi
Mickey Shaw (18) shoots against Michigan Tech

YOUNG, EXPERIENCED:
Cn e

Al Renfrew praised the Badger
goaltending as the key to the
Wolverine defeat.
Renfrew added that the teams
biggest problem was that "we
never put three good periods of
hockey together." This was evi-
dent in many games, especially
in the two-game series at'Min-
nesota which Renfrew termed
as "the turning point of the
season" for the eventual WCHA
champions. In b o t h contests
Michigan held early leads only
to see them melt away into con-
vincing defeats.
In the opening affair Michi-
gan held a 4-2 lead after two
periods before their weakened
defense collapsed enabling the
Gophers to g r a b an 8-6 tri-
umph.
The following afternoon Mich-
igan leaped to a 3-0 first per,-
iod advantage before succumb-
ing again, 6-3.
NOT ONLY did the Wolver-
ines show a two-face person-
ality during individual games,
Michigan was also unsteady in
their two g a m e sets. Out of
twelve weekends in WCHA play,
the icers split nine of t h e m
while winning one and dropping
two. Their only t w i n killing
came over a hapless Colorado
College squad at the Coliseum
as they ecked out an 8-7 decis-
ion Friday - night while K a r 1
Bagnell gained his only shut-
out of the season in taming ,the
Tigers 6-0 in Saturday's en-
counter. The icers lost pairs to
Minnesota-Duluth and Minne-
sota.
Michigan was not the only
team that was unsteady during
the season. Renfrew mentioned
that the remainder of the teams
were up one night and down the
next with the exception of Den-
ver and Wisconsin. "They were
the most consistant squads last
year."
Asked why league play was
unsteady, Renfrew noted that
the freshman rule m a:d e the
teams accept two groups of nev
players: the new freshmen and
sophomores also. That is a lot
of untested ability as Michigan
alone had 11 new players.
Another major problem the
Wolverines encountered w a s
their forwards' failure to back-
check. The forwards constantly
made the defense look bad as
the front line was caught up i:e
many times during the season.
"It was just a disappointing
year," concluded Renfrew.
The, upcoming season should
be a promising one as last-year's
team lost only five players via
graduation. Captain Dave Per-
rin who finished third on the

fors
team in league scoring (14
goals, 10 assists), along w i t h
Barney Pashak will b o t h be
missed at left wing while sec-
ond leading scorer and "most
valuable player" Don Deeks va-
cates one of the center slots.
Renfrew commented that Deeks
was a good all-around. player
and was especially good on face-
offs. "Lack of stamina was .he
only thing working against
him."
The Heyliger twins, who spec-
ialized in penalty killing round
out the graduating corps.
THE ENTIRE DEFENSE has
returned for the. upcoming sea-
son with much needed exper-
ience as Tom Marra was the
only veteran defenseman 1 a s t
year. Marra, a senior, is joined
by juniors B r i a n Skinner,
"Punch" Cartier and "most im-
proved player" Jerry Lefebvre.
Michel Jarry, who. had a fine
year, and Gary Connelly, who
was out the entire season with
a broken leg, complete the de-
fense.
Renfrew mentioned that the
goaltending came on toward the
later part of the season as Bag-
nell had to make up lost ground
since he was inactive his entire
freshman year. Doug Hastings,
a sophomore from Edina, Min-
nesota may share goaltending
duties with Bagnell.
The offense will be led by
Michigan's most successful line
of newly-elected captain Paul
Gamsby, speedy I e f t-winger
Brian Slack and "most color-
ful player" Bernie Gagnon.
Merle Falk, Bucky Straub, and
Mickey Shaw make up the sec-
ond line while the third line is
still up for grabs.
/ Speed has always been the
Wolverine strength on offense
and the upcoming season should
not change figuratively.
CORNELL GAINED the NCAA
crown last season by defeating
Clarksjon in the national fi-
nals at Lack Placid, New York.
Both Wisconsin and Michigan
Tech, the WCHA's two repre-
sentatives fell in t h e semifi-
nals as Cornell and Clarkston
advanced.
The winners of the WCHA
Eastern and Western playoffs
made the NCAA's.
To get to the NCAA Tourna-
ment Wisconsin beat Denver for
the Western crown, while Mich-
igan Tech defeated Minnesota
for the Eastern crown.
Wisconsin advanced to meet
Denver rafter their victory over
Michigan while Denver knock-
ed off Michigan State.

-Daily.-Thomasa R. Copt
Dave Perrin in white) drives by defender

boast talent

By DALE ARBOUR
The future of the 'Wolverine
track squad is rather bright for
the coming 1971 season. The reas-
on for this optimism comes from
the loss of only seven seniors on
last season's team which had a
dual meet record of 3-1, finishing
a disappointing fifth indoors and
*outdoors in the Big Ten Meets.
This year's new team is young,
made up mostly of underclass-
men with only 11 seniors out of.
approximately 80 men.
The Michigan squad will be
aiming to defeat Wisconsin and
Indiana, who have the strongest
two teams in the Big Ten. But this
will be no easy :task since both
teams have most of their top men
returning. Michigan State and
Ohio State also have strong teams
but were also both defeated in
dual meets by the Wolverine
squad, so they will not be as large
a threat as Indiana or Wisconsin.
Leading the young Michigan
squad will be seniors Norm Corn-
well and Rick Storrey. Cornwell is
the current school record holders
in the 660-yard dash and has also
been. a member of Michigan's
strong two-mile relay squad which
was third indoors in the NCAA
meet.
Storrey is also a member of the
two-mile relay team besides being
strong in both' the 1000-yard and
one-mile runs. He has best times
in these two events of 2:10.4 and
4:07.8 respectively.
An abundant supply of talent is
also present from last year in
many other events. Junior Larry
Wolfe was injured most of last
season but still has gone over 16-0
in the pole vault, which is the
best in the Big Ten. Another jun-
4 ior John Mann, has gone 6-11 in
the high jump' which puts him
among the top three in the confer-
ence. Freshman Bob Hartrich will
add some depth to the high jump
with his best height of 6-5.
IN THE SPRINTS, Gene Brown
0 tleads the way for Michigan with
personal bests of :06.0 in the 60-
yard dash and :09.5 in the hun-

teadiness

dred. He will be accompanied by
senior Ron Clark and sophomore
Bob Pincham, both of whom per-
form relay duty in the 440-yard
and occasionally the 880-yard re-
lays and the sprint medley.
The shot put and discus should
become a strong Wolverine event
for many years to come with the
addition of freshman Steve Adams
from Montvale, New Jersey. At 6-7
and weighing 270 pounds, Adams
has tossed the 12-pound shot 66-% /
and thrown the discus 179 feet,
both of these distances being near
the best in the country for preps.
He will be joining senior Giulio
Catello and sophomores Paul Tor-
an and Brian Block who have all
put the shot over 50 feet.
In the long jump, Michigan lost
the, superb Ira Russell through
graduation. Russell achieved a
long standing ambition when he
cracked the 25-foot barrier, jump-
.ing 25-6%}/ in the Purdue meet.
That broke the old Ferry Field
dual meet.record by well over two
feet. Michigan went on to com-
pletely outclass the Purdue' squad.
taking an easy 108-45Nictory.
One tof the nation's top hurdlers
is Michigan's sophomore flash,
Godfrey Murray, who already is
co-holder of the varsity record in
the 120-yard high hurdles at :13.7.
He will be joined this season by
freshman Mel Reeves from Pon-
tiac Northern High School who
set the national high school mark
in the 70-yard high hurdles in-
doors at :08.5.
Reeves has gone :14.0 in the
120-yard high hurdles and :18.9 in
the 180-yard lows, and he has also
beaten Murray once indoors. Thus,
some interesting duels should re-
sult in the coming season in the
hurdles between Murray and
Reeves.
The middle-distance e v e n t s
should be sufficiently strong in
the coming season. Besides Corn-
well and Storrey, there are some
other quick milers and half-milers.
Junior Phil Pyatt has gone 4:11.9
indoors and he will be joined by
teammates Tom Swan and Mike
Pierce. Swan has recorded a best

time of 4 13 while Pierce has run
4:15.5 in high school last year.
PIERCE HAS also gone 9:25.1
indoors in the two-mile which will.
bring some depth to the Wolverine
distance events. He will be joining.
s3nior Kirk Hansen who has a
personal best of 9:10.2 in the two-
mile and is'1hoping to go under
nine minutes this season.
The half-mile will once again
be the strongest Michigan event
with eight runners capable of
running under 1:54, three being
able to run under 1: 1. These
three fastest include Storrey,
Cornwell, and sophomore Eric
Chapman who recorded a 1:49.2
split in the two-mile relay indoors
last year.

The quarter-mile is another
event which abounds in depth.
The top two Michigan quarter-
milers are seniors Loienzo Mont-
gomery and junior Reggie Brad-
ford, who have both . recorded
times in the 48 second range.
Other top quarter-milers. are
sophomores-George Drew, Trevor
Matthews, Eric Chapman, Greg
Syphax, and Al D'Agostino-who
as freshmen were often running
mile relay times (3:14.9) faster
than the varsity team.
So, over all, the coming year for
Michigan track should prove to
be full of competition, especially
from Wisconsin and Indiana, but
the Wolverines could prove them-
selves as the best in the Big Ten
in 1971.

Michigan Tech reached the
Eastern finals by edging North
Dakota and Minnesota needed
three overtimes to eliminate
Minnesota-Duluth.
The WCHA has incorporated
one major rule change to go in-
to effect this season. The rule
deals specifically with a player
being offside at the blue line.
Previously as the puck preceded
the offensive player across the
attacking -blue line the player
had to keep both skates on his
side of the line. Now, as in the
National Hockey League, he
may have one skate across the
blue line and still be legally on-
side. This is called "straddling
the line."f
The only major difference be-
tween collegiate and profession-
al hockey is the elimination of
the center line in the college va-

riety. This alteration allows
longer legal passes in college
hockey and provides the fans
with a much faster game.
The Michigan Coliseum will
undergo only one change. The
boards surrounding the entire
rink will be replaced. 0 t lh e r
than that the arena will remain
the same providing seating'for
over 3200 enthusiasts.
The Wolverines are looking
forward to an exciting season
including two holiday tourna-
ments.
Michigan will return to the
Great Lakes Invitational at De-
troit's Olympia Dec. 29 and 30.
The icers captured this classic
in 1966 when Mel Wakayabashi
starred. The squad will t h e n
travel to Buffalo, new NHL city,
to compete in the Nichols Invi-
tational January 1, and 2.

Meet at
ULRICH'S hook Store
Where the BOYS are

_ _ _ _-

I

Beat the

Deadline -

1970 Schedule

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w

Order

Your

Michigan

September
19-ARIZONA
26-at Washington
October
3-TEXAS A&M
10-at Purdue
17-MICHIGAN ST.
24-M IN N ESOTA
31-at Wisconsin

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
John Mann clears the bar

Football Tickes Now
Special Student, Faculty Prices
Still Available for 6 Home Games
Another fast-moving Michigan football season opens Sept. 19, but there's still
time for you to reserve your seat for all the action and color on Saturday
afternoon in Michigan Stadium. Remember, students and University
staff can see Michigan football at special reduced prices. You'll
see the Big Ten's defending cochampions playing another de-
manding schedule. Coach Bo Schembechler, voted college
football's coach of the year, is assembling an out-::

November
7-ILLINODS
1 4-IOWA,
21-at Ohio St.

I i

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standing defensive team. On offense those two
exciting sophomores of last season, halfbacks
Billy Taylor and Glenn Doughty, along
with quarterback Don Moorhead are
all back. Six Saturdays of college
football. Don't miss them.
Student Foot ball
Tiket Informaltion
0 Students this year may charge their football tickets on t
count. Price for the six-game home season is just $14.

Three Plays A Minute-That's Michigan Football

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Special Offer
To 'M' Staff
University' 'taff members can
purchase season football tickets at
half price, just $18, by stopping
at the athletic department Ticket
Office, 1000 S. State St. Your $18
purchase not only means a season
football ticket, but an athletic
coupon which entitles you to re,
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hockey and swimming events.

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