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October 03, 1970 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-03

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Wage Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, October 3, 1970

Page. SixTHE MICHIGAN DAILY

Hi-Fi Studio
121 W. Washington 668-7942
presents
GARRARD
the finest in record changers

Sparta ns,

Irish

collide

*r

SKI FRANCE
uI o( Wi Li C/ue

By KEN COHN
The Big Ten football teams,
which won only four games in
non-conference play last week,
face another tough schedule to-
day, but the circuit could regain
some lost prestige by pulling off
several upsets. At least t w o
games will be watched closely na-
tionally - one of them another
installment in an old, bitter riv-
alry and the other a further test
of one of the most powerful col-
lege teams in grid history.
T h e Spartans of Michigan,
State, after knocking off Wash-
ington State last week, 28-14, now
face the awesome task of playing
three of the nation's gridiron pow-
erhouses in as many weeks. The
first o ne, the fourth-ranked
fighting Irish of Notre Dame, will
invade East Lansing today, fresh
off a 48-0 shellacking of Purdue.
MSU will battle against 0 h 10o

3rd ANNUAL TRIP
TO THE ALPS

/

$325 ROUND TRIP
FOR INFORMATION -- Call: Daryl
761-0833 after 5:30; or come to MASS
MEETI NG. Oct. 5th Union Ballroom
7:00 P.M.
Join The Daily Sports Staff

STUDENT
RATES
4c to
2c
Econocopy
1217 S. Univ.
761-0087

State next week and then tangle
with the Wolverines in Ann Ar-,
bor Oct. 17.
The Green Meanies, 1-1 on the
season, will have to come up with
a supreme performance to upset
the mighty Irish, who may have
their best team since the days of
Frank Leahy. Their highly tout-
ed quarterback and Heisman tro-
phy candidate, Joe Theismann,
and super-receiver Tom Gate-
wood combined for three TD pass-,
es against Purdue and form the
backbone of an offense which has
averaged 545 yards a game this
year. Sophomore tight end Mike
Creaney is considered by team of-
ficials to be perhaps the best pros-
pect at that position in several
years.
NOTRE DAME'S depth in the
offensive backfield is evidenced
by four backs with over 100 yards
each. Their defensive line a n d
secondary also were suberb in last
week's shutout, bolstered by the
play of halfbacks Clarence Ellis
and Ralph Stepaniak, both Michi-
gan products. But Coach Ara Par-
seghian said this week that he
was "concerned about the speed
of \the Spartan backfield. I think
quarterback Mike Rasmussen es-
pecially has a great potential."
MSU will be crippled by injur-
ies to such starters as tackle Mike
Hogan and guard Dan Kulikowski.
Coach Duffy Daugherty recogniz-
es the Irish's strength - "Theis-
mann is an all-around great run-
ner and passer, and they h a v e
fast running backs,, such as Bill
Barz and Dennis Allen, to aug-
ment their power.''
But he sees hope in several out-
standing performances turned in
by Spartans last week. "Lineback-
er Cal Fox was named lineman of
the week by a national wire ser-
vice; he's one of our finest play-
ers and best leaders," said Daugh-
erty.
IN ADDITION, Eric Allen, the
Spartan's liiliptltian flanker, thril-
led State fans with his deceptive
style of running against Wash-
ington State, grabbing five passes
for 91 yards. The Spartans also
have history going for them. Al-
though N otre Dame leads the ser-
ies, 19-15-1, and won last year,
42-28, State hasn't lost to t h e
Irish in East Lansing since 1949.
The South Benders, furthermore,
have never before played on arti-
ficial turf such as that at Spartan.
Stadium, and in fact worked out
in Michigan Stadium Thursday
and yesterday to accustom them-
selves to the new playing condi-
tions.

Meanwhile, Ohio State's Buck-
eyes, number one in the nation,
will tangle with the Blue Devils of
Duke University, in Columbus.
OSU opened the '70 campaign by
tearing apart Texas A&M, Michi-
gan's opponent today, by the mar-
gin of 56-13. The 1968 "Super
Sophs" of Ohio State are pretty
much intact this season, o n 1 y
more experienced and with a
burning desire to avenge last
year's turnabout at the hands of
the Michigan Wolverines.
LAST WEEK Woody Hayes'
Buckeyes rolled up 513 yards in
Michigan's rugby teams take
on Kent State University at
Palmer Field this morning. The
Gold squad plays at 9:00 a.m.
while the Blue ruggers take to
the field at 11:00 a.m.
displaying all facets of their ov-
erwhelming abilities - QB Rex
Kern gained 142 total yards and
fullback John Brockington scored
twice, while the OSU defense
forced numerous fumbles and in-
terceptions. Halfbacks Larry Ze-
lina and Leo Hayden a n d ends
Bruce Janowski and Jan White
augment the Buckeye bulldozer.
On defense, all-American line-
backer Jack Tatum and defensive

back Mike Sensibaugh back up an
overpowering line.
Duke, just off a 17-7 victory
over Virginia, will be hard-pressed
-to hold back the Bucks. Leo, Hart
will provide the necessary passing
strength, having broken all Duke
passing records. He passed for 231
y a r d s against Virginia for the
Blue Devils' second victory against
one loss.
ELSEWHERE on the Big Ten
grid scene; Purdue, having been
humiliated by Notre Dame, tra-
vels west to face the third-ranked
Indians of Stanford, led by. the
heralded a r m of Jim Plunkett,
who toppled Oregon last w e e k.
Minnesota, cheered by their de-
struction of Ohio U. last week,
49-6, face sixth-ranked Nebraska,
who have regained some of their
past glory so far this season.
The Badgers of Wisconsin, af-
ter tying TCU's Horned Frogs last
week, host Penn .State, who re-
main a heavy threat despite their
thumping at the hands of 'Colo-
rado. Indiana, clobbered by Cali-
fornia last week, will meet the
undefeated Mountaineers of West
Virginia, ranked 14th in the coun-
try.
Rounding out the Big Ten, Illi-
nois, 1-1 so far, will face dissen-
sion-racked Syracuse, Iowa tra-
vels to Arizona to meet the Wild-
cats, and Northwestern meets
SMU in Evanston.

.4,
r1

-Associated Press
DENNIS ALLEN, Notre Dame setback, dives for six points in the
Irish's 48-0 victory over Purdue last Saturday. Failing to make
the tackle for Purdue is Charlie Potts (83). The Irish meet Michi-
gan State today in East Lansing.

I

_.

f
UW

LONGHORNS, BR UINS CLASH
Intersectional wars continue

The Center for Afro-American and African Studies
Invites you to its Lecture Series
BLACK PERSPECTIVES IN THE SEVENTIES
Tuesday, October 6, 1910 at 1:30 P.M.
IN RACKHAM AUDITORIUM+
Speaker: MINISTER LOUIS FARRAKHAN
Minister, Mosque No. 7, Harlem, New York
Topic: BLACK LIFE AND COMMUNITY UPLIFT
-Admission FREE -

By DENNIS NIEMIEC
A variety of close conference
battles spotlight this week's college
football schedule. As the season
enters its fourth week, many
squads begin their quest for a con-
ference championship and subse-
quent bowl bid.
However, one notable intersec-
tional clash pits unbeaten UCLA
against defending'national cham-
pion Texas. Although 3-0 this
year, UCLA has been relatively
unimpressive in their victories. So
far the Bruins have relied heavily
on their defense to pull t h e m
through. Offensively they, h a v e
managed to move the ball b u t
have had problems putting points
on the board. This week at Aus-
tin UCLA. hurler Dennis Dum-
mit will have to spark the offense
if his team is to keep their un-
blemished record.
The Longhorns on the other
hand now possess the nation's

longest win streak of 22 games
which also ties a Southwest Con-
ference record. In easy wins over
California and Texas Tech the
Longhorns have been lead by new
signal caller Eddie Phillips (8th
in rushing in the nation) and full-
back Steve Worster (6th in scor-
ing).
C O A C H DARREL Royal, ob-
voiusly proud of an offense which
ranks 3rd in total offense and
first in rushing, describes the
Texas attack this way, "Any team
we play can stop Worster - if
they are willing to pay the price,
or they can stop us going wide
-if they are willing to let Worster
rip them up the middle."
In a Big Eight game, surprising
Colorado meets disappointing
Kansas State in the conference
opener for both schools. The Buf-
falos scored a tremendous upset
last week, ending a 31 game uni-
beaten streak for Penin State with

I

Concerned About the "Environment?
INVESTIGATE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN
PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH!
The University of Michigan Program in Health Planning will be
interviewing prospective master degree candidates TUESDAY,
OCT. 6, ALL DAY at the Placement Office (SAB).

a shockingly easy 41-13 triumph.
In fact safety Pat Murphy inter-
epted a pass on the first play
setting up a Colorado score only
85 seconds into the game.;
Another Buffalo star, Cliff
Branch (No. 1 in kickoff returns),
opened the second half with a 97-
yard return. Coach Eddie Crowd-
er now. faces the task of prevent-
ing a'letdown by his 8th ranked
team. However, the Buffaloes ap-
pear to be a closely knit group.
BEFORE THE season seven
members of the defense shaved
their heads. "It kinda signifies
what football means to us" said
safety John (Bad Dude) Stearns.
Kansas State, one of the pre-
season choices to fight for the
Big Eight crown, has a 1-2 record
to date. This fact can be directly
traced to a rib injury sustained by
quarterback Lynn Dickey in the
Kentucky game. However, the ace
hurler should be ready by t h i s
Saturday, a fact which will con-
siderably aid the Kansas State
attack.
Coach Gibson has set first
priority on the conference sched-
ule, knowing that a champion-
ship is more important than early
season games. This Saturday's
contest will be a home game for
Kansas State which is always a
plus.
On the West coast, Oregon
State travels to USC to take on
the vaunted Trojan machine. Af-
ter a close opening loss to UCLA,
the Beavers have outpointed Iowa
and Oklahoma. Last Saturday
Junior Steve Endicott threw 3 TD
passes and Dee Andros' runners
rambled for 253 yards as Oregon
State outplayed the then )13th
ranked Sooners.'
SO FAR this season the Beav-1

er defense has proved to be very
tough in the clutch. After edging
Oregon State, UCLA 'coach Tom-
my Prothro praised the determin-
ation of the Beaver defense inside
their 20 yard line. This group will
have to remain impenetrable if
the Beavers are to ambush USC.
The 5th ranked Trojans ap-
pear to be as good as ever. Coach
John McKay's gang are, bidding
for an unprecedented fifth straight
trip to the Rose Bowl. Last week
at Iowa the Trojans employed
their ball control offense to net
660 yards despite the fact that the
second string played the second
half.
USC scored 7 of the 11 times
they had possession with tailback
Clarence Davis leading the way
with 151 yards in 17 carries. The
defense held Iowa to 23 yards in
the air and 190 on the ground. If
it has a weakness, it is against
the run since 4 members of the
fabled Wild Bunch have grad-
uated.
In a Southeast Conference bat-
tle undefeated Auburn plays at
Kentucky. Auburn's quarterback
Pat Sullivan is second in total of-
fense behind Jim Plunkett. Coach
Shug Jordan, one of the winning-
est coaches over the last 19 sea-
sons, has, rebuilt the defense. This
defense proved its strength in
leading the way in their upset
win over Tennessee.
Kentucky, under defense-mind-
ed coach;John Ray, is one of the
spoiler teams of the country. This
season the Wildcats have already
upset Kansas State and scared
Mississippi. Heisman candidate
Archie Manning managed to com-
plete only 12 of '30 passes against
Kentucky with 2 intercepted. The
rugged defensive line led by Dave
Roller should present Auburn with
a stern test.

*

B.A.s in social sciences preferred
Full financial assistance available

HAPPY'
HOUR
... after the A&M game
from 5-7 at the
208 W. HURON

SIGN UP FOR INTERVIEW AT
3200 SAB-Placement Office-764-7460

.. . ! i

WORSHIP

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, tramporta+ion, personalized
help, etc. phone 76>-6299 or 761-6749.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-World Wide Com-
munion Sunday. Sermoneby Dr. Hoover Ru-
pert: "Eat, Drink'and Be Mindful."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
11:00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Oct. 4 at 5:30 p.m.-Celebration,
Wesley Lounge; Dinner at 6:15, Pine
Room; 7:00, Program-"Where Are We
Going?," Wesley Lounge.
Monday, Oct. 5 at noon-Luncheon Discus-
sion, "Christianity and Foreign Policy"
(through Nov. 2)-Leader, Bart Beavin.
Thursday. Oct. 8 at noon-Luncheon Discus-
sion, "Does the Church Keep the Poor?"-
Leader, Bart Beavin.

UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY

Kapp signed b Patriots;
A's name new manager
By The Associated Press
0 BOSTON - The Boston Patriots announced yesterday the
acquisition of Joe Kapp, the star quarterback who played out his
option while leading the Minnesota Vikings to the National Football
League championship last year.
Coach Clive Rush of the Patriots said Kapp would be activated
immediately but would not start Sunday against the Baltimore Colts
here.
Kapp, technically a free agent at the end of the 1969 season,
sat out the first two games this season while negotiating for a news
contract with Minnesota.
President Billy Sullivan of the Patriots told a news conference
that in compliance with National Football League policy even though
Kapp was a free agent, the Patriots were making compensation
to the Vikings for his acquisition.
*OAKLAND - Dick Williams, former Boston Red Sox manager,
succeeded John McNamara as manager of the Oakland Athletics
yesterday and will have a two-year contract in the job no one has been
able to hold that long.
"I'm looking forward to a long association with Charlie Finley
and the Oakland Athletics," Williams said after Finley, the A's
owner, made his 11th change in managers in 11 years.
--54.11-6

yV

310'S.'State St.
Phone 663-4314
Mrs. Eleonore Krafft, Minister
Mrs. Viola Mattern, Associate
:00 a.m.-Sunday Service-Mrs. Mattern.
:30 p.m. Tuesday-Study arid Prayer Class
-Mrs. Krafft.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY

GOODBYE MAYO:
Billy Martin named
new Tiger manager

Vi

School

11
7

11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prover
and Counseling, also,-12 noon to 1:00 p.m.
-Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center Open: Mon., Wed., and Fri.-1 1:00
a.m. to 2:00 p.m.; Tuesday-3:00 to 5:00
p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-"I wouldn't give much for that
man's religion whose cat and dog are not
the better for it."-A. Lincoln. Come.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Organization, Supper and Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Service.

8:00 a m.-Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays..
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-"Profit, Priest and King."
5:00 p.m.-Supper.
6:00 p.m. Service of Holy Communion.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.

DETROIT (/P) - "I think we
can win the pennant and that's;
why I'm here," emphasized fiery
Billy Martin Friday after the De-
troit Tigers said he had signed a
two-year contract to manage the
team.
"I don't think major changes
are necessary," he added at- an
afternoon news conference. , "I
think the material is here. There
are just a few changes that need
to be made."
The announcement came as no
surprise. There had been 'specu-
lation for quite a while that Mar-
tin would be named as M ay o
Smith's replacement as soon as
the season ended.
"I know I'm taking a wonder-
ful man's spot in Mayo Smith,"
exclaimed the colorful former
New York Yankee second base-
man.
"I've admired him all my life."

Martin, 42, who currently works
for a Minneapolis radio station,
managed the Minnesota Twins to
the W e s t Division title of the
American League last year after
the Twins finished seventh the
year before.
He was fired after the season
ended, apparently because of a
dispute with Calvin Griffith, the
Twins' owner.
"Billy is a lot different in many
respects than Mayo, but this
doesn't make Mayo wrong," said
T i g e r General Manager Jim
Campbell. "Each type can do a
certain job under the circumstan-
ces. We j u s t needed a change
here."
Campbell, team owner John
Fetzer, and Martin all expressed
belief that they would get along
well. Martin said he was v e r y
close to accepting a managing of-
fer at Oakland but chose Detroit
because he has known Campbell a
long time, and knows the organi-
zation and personnel better.
The most important thing Mar-
tin seemed to stress was that he
planned to "communicate with
all the players.
"I don't think there's a genera-
tion cgan." M~fartin explained. nu~f-

4

I,

--Ii

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.

Monday, Oct. 5, 4:00 P.M., Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Library
WILLIAM STRINGELLOW SPEAKING
lnk. eosi &i -n -m a lw .u a n.uA.Aom- -s... .u w

4

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.

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