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October 03, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-03

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Famous PIZZA & CHICKEN
from
THOMPSON'S PIZZA
211 E. ANN ST. (Next to Armory)
CALL 761-0001
FREE DELIVERY-7 Days a Week--FREE DELIVERY
G}INEIU~" O2USI
PRESENTS
TONIGHT & TOMORROW NIGHT
THE GOOD NEWS
Columbia Recording Artists
" intimations of immortality from inside a cello.
-G. WASHINGTON
* Michael and Larry are alive and well. Their music
is an underture to the overture of Love.--O. U.
Diety "
330 MAYNARD ST. -8 P.M. - $2.50 PER
BREAD CHEESE, COFFEE, CIDER, RED POP

p~age three

11

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Saturday, October 3, 1970 Ann Arbor, MichiganPage three

I

neBws ybies
By The Assoczated Press

A FEDERAL COURT, consisting of three judges, yesterday
upheld the constitutionality of the 1970 Voting Rights Law, in-
eluding 'the provision to lower the voting age from 21 to 18."
The court stated that denying the 18-year-olds the vote would
constitute an "invidious discrimination" violating the equal protection <
requirements of the 14th Amendment..
The court acted in a suit brought by five New Yorkers against
Atty. Gen. John Mitchell and the New York City Board of Elections. . .
The decision upheld amendments adopted by Congress this
year to the Voting Rights Law, including bans on literacy tests and
certain state residency requirements for voting 'in presidential elec.
tions.
FIRE FIGHTERS held the upper hand yesterday on most of F
the large brush and timber fires still burning in California, al-
though a 43,000 acre blaze was still uncontrolled.
The unchecked fire was in San Bernardino County, some 80 miles;
east of Los Angeles. Rising winds and near 100-degree temperatures ' .. ,
helped the flames spread along rugged canyons there, but no com- Z,
munities were threatened. " ....
tL::"?j?;: ..... :~. ". { K.: k:T:
THE MICHIGAN COURT OF APPEALS yesterday upheld the
conviction of a college newspaper editor on charges of distributing PRESIDENT NIXON and Spanish Chief of State Ge
an obscene article. dential Palace in Madrid during Nixon's one-day stop
James Wasserman, editor of the campus paper "Lanthorn" at
Grand Valley State College, was sentenced to pay $100 and his motion ST UDENTS DEMONSTRA TE:
for a new trial was denied.
The court ruled the article wa3 not protected from prosecution"
because of other unobjectionable, material in the paper, andthat i x onets en th u
obscenity is not protected by the First Amendment to the U.S. Con- stiogsn.h

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

I

!-Associated Press
n. Francisco Franco confer at the Pardo Presi-
p on his European tour.

Diplomats
begin talks
in Egypt
CAIRO (A) - While Egypt
mourned its president, the coun-
try's t o p officials opened talks
yesterday with foreign leaders who
attended Gamal Abdel Nasser's
funeral.
Premier Alexei Kosygin of the
Soviet Union and the head, of the
U.S. delegation' to i Thursday's
funeral met with the Egyptians,
apparently seeking to clarify the
future course of Egypt's govern-
ment.
Acting President Anwar Sadat,
Lt. Gen. Mohammed Fawzi, the
minister of war, and other Egyp-
tian leaders 'talked with Kosygin
and Marshal Matvei V. Zakharov,
the Soviet chief of staff.
Later Sadat had discussions
with Elliott Richardson, secretary
of health, education and welfare,
who led the American delegation
to the funeral. Sadat then held
another conference with Kosygin.
Richardson told newsmen that
in talks with Egyptian leaders he
has found "genuine interest" on
their part in continuing the Mid-
dle East cease-fire and, peace ne-
gotiations.
He said that Nasser had played
a "large, courageous part" in
bringing about the peace initia-
tive and he discussedk with For-
eign Minister Mahmoud Riad the
desirability of .extendipg the
~cease-fire if necessary. The 90-
day cease-fire is due to run out
Nbv. 5.
Richardsonssaid he discussed
with Egyptians the' mutual accu-
sations of cease-fire violations
that have blocked the peace talks
and added: "We hope this can be
resolved now."
The United States and Egypt
have had no diplomatic relations.
since Nasser accused the Ameri-
cans of supporting Israel during
the six-day war of 1967. The So-
viet Union is Egypt's chief, sup-
plier of arms and aids and has a
position of paramount influence.
Meanwhile in New York, the
prospects for resuming A r a b -
Israeli peace talks suffered ano-
th'er setback when,word that U.N.
special envoy Gunnar Jarring was
returning temporarily to his Mos-
cow diplomatic post.
Secretary-General U Thant an-
nounced that in the present cir-
cumstances the Swedish ambassa-
dor "has done. all that he can do"
for the time being in his Middle
East peace efforts.

isiastic welcome
Qwit Frqncr

the
Every MON DAY:
Football night, color TV,
happy hour prices
Every TUESDAY:
Apple Wine night-reduced prices
THURSDAY, Oct. 1:
THE LEAVES OF GRASS
9:30-1:30; Women half price
FR I DAY, Oct. 2:
FULL FAITH AND CREDIT
9:30-1 :30
SAtURDAY, Oct.3-
FULL FAITH AND CREDIT
9:30-1 :30
AFTER GAME 'HAPPY HOUR-5-7

INTERSTATE COMMERCE COMMISSION (ICC) investiga-
tions have uncovered possible criminal violations by employes in
the commission's Bureau of Traffic, ICC acting chairman Dale
Hardin announced yesterday.
Hardin said the agency's findings have been forwarded to the
U.S. attorney's office in Washington along with assurances of coopera-
tion by the ICC in any action warranted.
The traffic bureau has custody of all official copies of tariffs or
proposed changes filed by railroads, truck lines, and other carriers
regulated by the ICC.
The bureau also makes initial determination of the propriety of
rate schedules filed and on any protests relating to tariff.
Mitchell hits politica
sas i
say Z t muIst ave to r

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in IVLId rirl_ mPPt

Shows at
1:00-3:00
6:00-8:00

DIAL 5-6890

Doors Open
at
12:45

qt.. : ....

Too LateX
A rip-s
he-mantop
adventunr
-Judth Cflst, N
"A taut, gritty, war r,
movie that will keep
you on edge from
start to finish.
The best of Robert
('Dirty Dozen')
Aldrich's work."
-William Wolf,
Cue Magazine{

rho Hero-
norting,
i-notch war
e movie!"

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"Hammering, hard-
core action for fans
who flipped for
'The Dirty Dozen.'
Remindful of 'Bridge
On The River Kwai.'

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WASHINGTON OP) - Atty.
Gen. John Mitchell said yester-
day that civil disturbances of
the type that is often stimulated
by trained and disciplined ex-
tremist organizations "is head-
ing down a one-way street."
"It is running out of emer-
gency issues by which it can
inflame others," he told a Re-
publican gathering.
Mitchell said measures sought
by the Nixon administration will
help halt resorts to violence for
political ends because "Amer-
icans are shocked and bewilder-
ed by crimes that ofen are em-
KATE
and
"Made the Philly Folk Fes-
tival come alive." 1
-N.Y. TIMES
TUES. R.F.D. Boys
75c
U. Utah Phillips
$1.50
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ployed in the name of political
causes."
"Underground newspapers and
spokesmen for extremist organ-
izations," he said, "call openly
for revolution, for the murder
of liolicemen, for the gathering
of firearms and the making of
bombs."
He noted that on school cam-
puses in the last two academic
years there had been 322 bomb-
ings and cases of arsons or at-
tempted arson. In the same per-
iod he said, there were 513 sit-
ins and building seizures, 11,200
arrests, 9 deaths, numerous in-
juries and $12.5 million damage
to property.
"Amazingly," he said, "such
lawless acts-both on and off
the campus-are performed in
the name of reform, progress
and change.
"In their infinite wisdom

THE RED DESERT
dir. MICHAELANGELO ANTONIONI (1964)
Monica Vitti, wife of a wealthy Milan
industrialist, goes crazy. She has noth-'
ing to do but display herself as a wife/
mother and take a lover.
s
Monday: THE JOKE
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM

ask for parity on panel

111 1 V U AU1E.L ..E.X.1 kEJE yl... 4 J V V .k I
MADRID'(P) - President Nixon signs saying "Nixon," but the "I"
got an enthusiastic reception from in the president's name was re-
a huge crowd in Madrid yester- placed by a swastika.
day, while groups of students in The group smashed windows in
two other Spanish cities demon- the IBM building with iron bars
strated against his arrival. and birned an American flag.
In Barcelona, 100 youths march- Police arrived too late to make
ed on the International Business arrests.,
Machines (IBM) building carry- An estimated 500 persons,
ing red flags with hammers and chanting anti-Nixon, anti-Anier-
sickles. The band also carried ican slogans, burned two U.S.
flags in a plaza at Tarrasa, about
20 miles north of Barcelona. One
r Vio encearrest was made.
1 viTotlence, Thengutfurngi
greeting Nixon in Madrid on the
third stop of his Europeon tour
l owwas the largest crowd he has seen
itl o f lct.., on; his travels abroad, the Pres-
ident said.
A Spanish government spokes-
these rioters and vandals know man estimated that up to one and
so well what this country needs a half million people thronged the
that they can presume to force streets of this broad-avenued cap-,
it on the rest of us. trampling ital as Nixon, with the 77 year old
on our hard-won liberties in the Franco standing by his side, wav-
process." ed and smiled from the motor-
He noted administration spon- cade.
sorship of proposed legislation "It was a very exciting time and
to control explosives and in- a very exciting reception," Nixon
cendiary devices, increased pen- said. "It Was the largest crowd
alties for bombings and author- I have ever seen."
ity for the FBI to take imme- In a talk later, Nixon and
diate action in reference to Franco agreed that maintenance
bombings or burnings involving of the Middle East cease-fire is
institutions receiving federal a basic condition in the search
funds. for peace in that strife-torn area,
"Through these kinds of meas- a Spanish spokesman said.
ures, those who represent public The spokesman said the t w o
administrations duly elected by chiefs of state made a detailed
the people are serving notice analysis on Mediterranean prob-
.cd.i r lems and "what actions could be
that civil disturbance is wrong, taken to convert it into an area
that it will be punished, and that of peace."
ti will give way to the rule of Nixon and Franco agreed that
law in this country." continuance of the shaky cease-
- __ _ _ _ _ _ fire in the Middle East is neces-
sary for "the establishment of
peace, taking into account the in-
terests of all," the spokesman
added.
Social wor
., OCT. 3-4i

Continued from Page 1)
SWSU that it postpone its meet-
ings until the dispute ended.
"We hope the problem will be
resolved," said social work Prof.
Henry Meyer, chairman of the
committee. Then a committee can
proceed min doing what it set out
to accomplish."
The Association of Black Social
Work Students will meet today
and SWSU will meet Wednesday
to work out position papers on the
issue and new strategies "in case
reason fails," Friedman said.
"We do not want token repre-
National General Theatres
FOH VILLarGE
375 No. MAPLE RD..7694300

sentation, nor do we want to make
the dean's tenure easier. We can-
not legitimize that dean or that
body unless we have more student
representation," Friedman said.
Statistics Prof. Allen W. Spivey,
in the business administration
graduate school, spoke at the cen-
tennial meeting of the American
Fisheries Society in New York.
His topic, "Optimization in Com-
plex Management Systems,"
dealt with the use of optimiza-,
tion models in the management
of natural resources, especiallly
water resources.

(Continued from Page 1)
to cross a policeline. Three police-
men and one youth were injured.
Although there have been re-
ports that the wife of South Viet-
namese Vice President Nguyen
Cao Ky would not be able to fly
here to address the rally as plan-
ned, McIntyre told The Daily last
night that she "will definitely be
here tomorrow." The Associated
Press has quoted authoritative
k students,

A Communist appeal for de-
monstrations in Madrid against
Nixon's one-day visit went un-
heeded, apparently under pres-
sure of rigid police precautions.
President Nixon meets Britain's
Prime Minister Edward Heath to-
day for two hours of talks ex-
pected to concentrate on East-.
West relations, the Middle East
and economic problems.
Nixon arrives in London from'
Madrid on a five-hour stop that
will include lunch with the prime
minister and Queen Elizabeth II.
The President leaves late this
afternoon for Ireland--the last
stop on his five-nation European
tour-where he will consult with
Ambassador David Bruce, chief
American delegate to the Viet-
namese peace talks in Paris.
Antiwar protesters have threat-
ened to disrupt the President's
visit to Ireland. Posters and anti-
American slogans painted on the
walls of Quakers Cemetery at
Timahoe yesterday ilncluded one
saying: "Nixon wanted for mur-
der. 250,000 Vietnamese killed."

'March for Victory' .set;
peace groups to, protest:

sources as saying that Ky will not
come.
Addressing the crowd, McIntyre
said, "We thank the Lord that we
can come as Americans to our
capital and say 'In God we trust.'"
He brought them to the verge of
tears near the end of the cere-
mony when he asked for a victory
today "over the forces of dark-
ness."
Just before dispersing the 500
worshippers sang in unison "On-
ward Christian Soldiers." The
marchers plan to gather at 11 a.m.
today at Fourth St. and the. Mall
to march to the Washington
Monument.
In Ann Arbor yesterday, radical
groups led by Students for a Dem-
ocratic Society began organizing
a separate marching. group for to-
day's anti-war activities.
Leaflets were circulated around
the campus calling on students "to
join the revolutionary contingent
of Saturday's march."
According to a member of the
group, the contingent will assem-
ble at the corner of Green and
Hoover Sts. after the football
game.
Speaking at the Diag rally will
be Jerry Gordon, national co-
chairman of PAC and Michael
Stillwagon, Democratic candidate
for the congressional seat in this
district.
Robert Weber a spokesman for
the city police department, said
last night that no extra security
""precautions are being taken.

r=,
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I loved it."
-Bob Salmaggi,
Group W Network

.. A"

}

NO\ SHOWING
MON.-FRI.-7:00-9:30
SAT.-SUN.-2:00-
4:30-7:00-9:30

DIAL 8-6416
x43 A

Doors Open 12:45
Shows at
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M.

"" n MARKET/A

Paramount Pictures
Presents
A Howard W. Koch
-Alan Jay Lerner
Production
Starring
flarhrm

I

. . ..............

i

I_ 11 /' - ' m f W/ f%1l1Cd d EITIO.

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