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October 02, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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3020 Washtenaw, Ph 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
Box Office Open .6:30

NOW SHOWING
SHOW TIMES
TODAY'
7-9
SAT. &SUN.
1-3-5-7-9

page three

frkt i!3n

43ttiz

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, October 2, 1970 An Arbor, Michigan Page Three

CLINT EASTWOOD
'SHII EMACWiNE
A MARTIN RACKIN PROOUcnoN
TWO MULES FOR SISTER SARA.
Screenplay by ALBERT MALTZ" Story by BUDD BOETTICHER " Directed by DON SIEGEL
Produced by MARTIN RACKIN an CARROLL CASE
A UNIVERSAL PICTURE " TECHNICOLOR, * PAE.NAVISIO??
1R 1.D AuL AGES ADMITTED Parenta Gidace Suggested
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
proudliy presents Its 41st season
"CACTUS FLOWER" Oct. 14-17
"MAN OF LA MANCHA" Dec. 16-20
"SUBJECT WAS ROSES" Mar. 3-6
"BLITHE SPIRIT" Mar. 31-Apr. 3
"IN WHITE AMERICA" Apr. 21-24

Colleges
for blacks
to get aid
WASHINGTON MP-The Nixonj
administration responded to com-
plaints that it is insensitive to
black education by announcing a
30 per cent increase in federal
aid for predominantly black col-
leges yesterday.-
HEW Secretary Elliot L. Rich-!
ardson said in a statement the
$30 million increase was ordered
by President Nixon following ap-
peals from black educators.
The National Association for
Equal Opportunity in Higher Ed-
ucation complained recently that
the administration was ignoring!
the needs of black Americans andj
their colleges. The association is
composed of presidents of pre-
dominantly black colleges and uni-I
versities.
"The present finacial plight of
many of our small and the over-
whelming majority of our pre-
dominantly black colleges clearly
demonstrates to me that the fed-
eral government must strengthen!
its role in support of equal op-
portunity," Nixon said in a letter
of reply to Dr. Herman B. Brae-E
son.
Branson is former president of{
Central sState University at Wil-
berforce, Ohio and vice president
of the black college association.'
Branson said in a telephone inter-
view that the additional $30'mil-
lion is not nearly enough to meet
the needs of financially pressed
black colleges, "although we are:
deeply appreciative."
The bulk of the additional aid
is money borrowed from othert
federal programs or carried ever
from previous years and does not
represent a significant net in-
crease in government- education
spending.

"THE BRASS AND GRASS FOREVER"
(an original musical)

-Associated Press
No place like home
President Nixon and Yugoslavian President Tito chat with a woman during a visit to Tito's birth-
place yesterday on the second day of Nixon's official visit to Yugoslavia.
25 PER CENT INCREASE?
'11he ,
Teramiiation of sick corn:
Hamburger prices- may- soar

news briefs
By The Associated Press
PLANNERS FOR THE upcoming Victory Rally expect a
crowd of 500,000 despite the absence of their principal speaker-
South Vietnamese Vice President Nguyen Cao Ky.
The rally is to be held on the Mall in Washington D.C. this
weekend.
The Rev. Carl McIntire, whose International Council of Christian
Churches is the chief sponsor of the rally, told newsmen: "People
who were not planning to come are cancelling their plans and are
coming in righteous indignation against the Nixon administration."
McIntire, a New Jersey fundamentalist radio preacher, charged
the Nixon administration with putting pressure on Ky that eventually
forced him to cancel his appearance at the rally.
A $19.9 BILLION MILITARY procurement bill, authorizing
expansion of the Safeguard antimissile system, was approved by
the Senate yesterday.
On a voice vote, it passed the compromise bill hammered out by a
House-Senate conference, and sent it to the White House.
The final version sets defense policy in a number ofareas, in-
cluding open-ended arms sales to Israel, and puts spending limits
on the Pentagon's shopping list fornew weapons.
The bill permits the spendinglof $1.3 billion to expand the Safe-
guard system to new sites at Warren Air Force Base, Wy., and White-
man Air Force Base, Mo.
* * *
A MAJOR INCREASE in Social Security benefits was ap-
proved by the Senate Finance Committee yesterday.
The provision, written into a House-passed Social Security meas-
ure, woulld provide the 26 million Americans now on the rolls with a
10 per cent increase in benefits and a $100 minimum monthly pay-
ment.
The proposed increase'would add $3.7 billion to the cost of the
House measure, which currently provides for, a five per cent general
raise.
The Senate Committee's decisions were reached almost wholly
on party lines with Democrats supporting the increases and Repub-
licans opposing them. President Nixon has asked for the five per cent
general increase.
The increase approved by the committee would take effect Jan. 1;
1971, the same effective date as the House bill.
* * * ,
JAZZMAN MILES DAVIS, the Beatles, Buddy' Miles and
others from the world of music paid tribute yesterday to the late
pop singer Jimi Hendrix at his funeral in Seattle.
Hendrix, named the world's top pop singer in a 1967 poll of British
fans, died in London Sept. 18 at the age of 27.
Other entertainers, including Johnny Walker and John Ham-
mond Jr., joined the Hendrix family in the plain brick church, where
a silvery gray metal casket stood. Among Me flowers massed around
it stood a seven-foot-high guitar.
THE NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION safety board said yes-
terday that engines of 747 jumbo jets are operating at "'near
critical turbine temperature conditions."
The board recommended quick steps to avoid "potentially cata-
strophic results ...
The board did not call for grounding of the huge airliners but
urged the Federal Aviation Administration to "initiate further ex-
peditious actions in order to preclude recurrence of similar failures"
as that experienced when fire damaged two of the jets recently.
There is evidence, the board said, that failures of 747 engines
occurred as a result of operation iat higher than desirable temperatures.

May 5-9

DON'T DELAY-ORDER YOUR SEASON TICKETS TODAY
(Use This Coupon)

NAMF

PHON E

rv

V7"lMC 1

ADDRESS.

CITY

i

.ZIP

Please reserve sets of season tickets, as indicated below.
I have enclosed $ I understand the tickets will be

mailed to me in the fall. I have enclosed
ed envelope.

a self-addressed, stamp-

*Wed. balcony
"Wed. orchestra
*Thurs. balcony.
*Thurs. orchestra
Fri. balcony
Fri. orchestra
Sat. balcony
Sat. orchestra

6 SHOWS
$ 8.50
10.50
8.50
10.50
11.50
13.50 Sold Out
11.50
13.50' Sold Out

5 SHOWS
$ 7.00
9.00
7.00
9.00
10.00
12.00 Sold Out
10.00
12.00 Sold Out
shows, please indicate

NEW YORK''A) - Because of
the corn blight, you may be pay-
ing 90/ cents next year for a
hamburger that now costs 75
cents, a leading brokerage spec-
ialist in farm commodities says.
Donald Cook, executive v i c e
president of Andco, Inc., a Chi-
cago-based Commodity broker-
age house, says that as a result
of the corn leaf blight that has
infested the crop throughout the
corn belt, beef prices could jump
20 per cent by next spring while
pork prices could soar 25, to 40
per cent.
The reason is that corn ac-
counts for 70 per cent of feed

grains used to nourish cattle
and hogs. Cook said in an inter-
view at the Intarnational -Com-
modities Conference, w h i c h
ended Wednesday.
Cut the corn supply, accord-
ing to Cook, and the result could
be corn prices so high that
farmers would be compelled to
send their ,livestock to slaugh-
ter sooner when they were not
full grown.
And, he says, a cut in the meat
supply at a time when demand
is very strong could trigger
sharp increases in beef and pork
prices at the retail level.
The executive says that the

disease, whose cause is unknown,
could shrink this year's c o r n
crop 13 per cent or more. That,
according to Cook, would mean
a harvest of 4.2 million bushels,
a four-year low.
"The situation could be even
worse," says Cook. "We cannot
tell yet how this blighted crop
will store or feed, or even how
it will harvest if the disease-
weakened stalks should . face
high winds."
He says the size of the corn
crop usually is known by this
time of year. But the blight, he
says, has left the quantity of
the harvest in doubt. A special
report by the Agriculture De-
partment to be released Friday
should shed more light on the
crop size, Cook says.
He says that the nation is
headed on a "collision course"
in corn. "Supplies of corn are
off sharply while we're on a
sharply rising usage path."
Many corn experts believe that
some of the 1971 crop also may
be infested with the blight.

OPTION: If you prefer tickets for only 5
which show you wish to omit:

*Best seat selection available for these performances.
MAIL TO P.O. BOX 1993, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48106

La Sociedad Hispanica
PRESENTS THE MOVIE
"THIS STRANGE PASSION"
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1970
Auditorium A, Angell Hall

I

$1.50
KATE
and

(English subtitles)
Showings 7 and 9

75c Admission

I

v

ROMA

-7 . .. ...... -------

"Made the Philly Folk Fes-
tival come alive."
N.Y. TIMES
TUES. R.F.p. Boys
75c

The

OdV4eV

I

NEXT WEEK-
U. Utah Phillips
$1.50
411 21111 TREET
N~i~l

-presents--
FULL FAITH AND CREDIT
one of Ann Arbor's great bands
Friday 9:30-1:30

CIEA IEINIM
LOLA MONTES
Directed by MAX OPHULS
"Makes 'Loves of Isadora' look like
'Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm' "
-S. A. SOLOMON
FRIDAY & SATURDAY
Aud A. - Angell Hall
75c Everyday Discount Price

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
agec. by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday,
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.
National General Theatres
FOX VIRLLr6E
375 No. MAPLE RD.-769130
NOW SHOWING
MON.-FRL-7:00-9:00
SAT.-SUN.-2:00
4:30-7:00-9:30
ParamountPictures
A Howard W. Koch
-Alan Jay Lerner
Production
Starring
Barbra
Streisand
YVes
Montand
0On A Clear Oa'
YOU Can See
i
Based upon the Musical Play
nA "ear"ay You C* ' See Forever
Panavisior Technico A Paramours Pictur-
"G-Al Ages Admitted General Audiences'

Saturday

5-7 after game
9:30-1 :30

happy hour

tI

Concerned About the Environment?
INVESTIGATE CAREER OPPORTUNITIES IN
PERSONAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH!
The University of Michigan Program in Health Planning will be
interviewing prospective master degree candidates TUESDAY,
OCT. 6, ALL DAY at the Placement Office (SAB) .
B.A.s in social sciences preferred
Full financial assistance available
SIGN UP FOR INTERVIEW AT
3200 SAB-Placement Office-764-7460

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