100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 01, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

J

Pcge Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 1, 1970

/

It's Here!.
/ -=
-.
Perfume: $8, 16,27.50, 5m-
Cologne: $6.50, 10.
- ToiletWater; $8.50.
:r
'--
'\-
C ,amdeis a rus hof
emotion, the hearts message oif lov.
Sy a
Chamade. By Guerlain. ,

BAY GUIDES JOCKS

M

athletes

hit

the,

By JOHN PAPANEK
Way back before the glory days
of college sports, a football or
baseball game was simply a way of
relaxing on a Sunday afternoon
and forgetting the academic .pres-
sures of the week, for players and
spectators alike. Sometimes teams'
would form, made up of the
school's best players, and venture
20 or 30 miles to challenge nearby
colleges.
EVENTUALLY, colleges began
to try to persuade exceptional local
high school athletes to enroll, in
hopes of fielding more powerful
teams. But their first responsibil-
ities were to be as students, and
on weekends they would become
athletes.
Well, times have changed. Ath-
letic departments have grown from
miniscule to immense bureaucratic
hierarchies. Today, colleges from
Southern Cal to Slippery R o c k
think nothing of flying a high
school star thousands of miles to.
wine him and dine him and set
him up with the sexiest of cheer-
leaders. Often his academic qual-
ifications (or lack of them) are
overlooked - purposely. The first
concern is to get the kid to sign
a letter of intent and thehnext
worry is a potential3 coaches'
nightmare: keep the kid eligible
to play.
Hare at Michigan, that job falls
upon the shoulders of Rick Bay,
the head of athletic counselling
who doubles as varsity wrestling
coach. Bay sees the only justifica-
tion for his office as being the tre-
mendously heavy extracurricular
schedule undertaken by Michigan
athletes.
One of Bay's problems is mak-
ing sure that no athlete's aca-
demic schedule clashes with his
practice schedule, but this worry
is a minor one. His two biggest
concerns are making sure that
players remain eligible and that
they graduate.
UNLIKE many of his counter-
parts around the country, B a y
feels thatfouryears of playing
a sport are wasted if the player
does not graduate,i and says, "I
don't care if he has every trophy
in the book, including the Heis-

man; if he doesn't have

that

sheepskin he has nothing."
He feels that since the athlete
has such a huge obligation to pay
to the university, his department
has an equally large one to pay
to the athlete. "This type of of-
fice is becoming more and more
predominant. The athletic depart-
ment has an obligation to make
sure that athletes graduate. We
don't use any nickel-dime courses
to get them through. Michigan is
far and above anyone else in the
Big Ten as far as graduating ath-
letes in a four-year period." From
1966 through 1969, Michigan has
graduated 70 per cent of its ath-
letes. Among Big Ten schools, that
figure for a single year has dip-
ped to as low as 10 percent.
Also, unlike many athletic coun-
sellors, Bay arranges the priorities
of education and athletics in the
following order: "Number one is
definitely education. (Athletics,
come second. Even a fellow with a
chance to play professional foot-
ball will be embarrassed without
a diploma. Look at the percent-
age of college players that end up
in pro ball. Just in case, we make
sure they hit the books for some-
thing to fall back on. That paper
is a tremendous source of secur-
ity and pride."
Before a particular season be-
gins, Bay meets with every player
on the team and explains his posi-
tion as academic counsellor. "I
first break down the §tereotype of
academic counsellor. I'm not there
to lead them by the hand. If a guy
comes in with one foot in the
grave and going down for the third
time, and has an E in the course
going into an exam, there's noth-
ing I ,can do. He can't expect help
until he's put forth a total effort.
Then we will get him a tutor; or if
it's not too ate, we see if he can
drop the course."

unless'they take those many hours,
they will not graduate in four
years. Also, if an athlete takes 15
or 16 hours, he can drop o n e
course if he gets into trouble and
still be eligible,
in addition, Michigan boasts
having the strictest grade, p o i n t
requirements in the Big Ten and
among the highest in the country.
The Big Ten says that in order to
be eligible, an athlete must haver a
1.7 after his freshman year, 1.8
after his sophomore year, and 1.9
after his junior year. Michigan
dictates that an athlete must have
a 2.0 at all times. If a player dips
below that point, his case is
brought before the academic eli-
gibility committee, which decides
whether or not he is to be eligible
on probationary status or ineligi-
ble. The committee also decides
whether or not the athlete m a y
retain his scholarship.
"The 2.0 requirement is an extra
burden burt I like it," Bay con-'
tends. "It is not too much of a
burden. A student needs a 2.0 to
graduate anyway."
Bay does not like the feeling
that a double-standard is applied
to athletes as opposed to ordin-
ary students. "Double-standard
has a bad connotation. The uni-
versity has many standards. They
take people who can contribute to
the university community in some
way. The music school might take
someone who is especially gifted in
music but with poor grades and
poor board scores. The engineering
school might take a guy with a
great aptitude in electronics and
little else.
IN DEFENDING ..the alleged
over-emphasis of college sports
today, Bay claims that in addi-
tion to bringing fame, prestige,
and money to the university, the
athletic department is self-sus-
taining and draws little support
from the academic community. "If
it wasn't for athletics, all that
money would not be available,"
he says. "Our tutorial program is
supported entirely by the grad-
uate M-club. The money we use
is generated by us, soI think we're
entitled to it."

books
There has been a lot said and
written about how colleges exploit
their athletes, use. them only to
play their sport and then virtually
discarding them. Bays does not
deny that this occurs in some
cases, but he is also aware of
athletes who exploit their colleges.
"Take a guy like Spencer Hay-
wood," he says. "An entire recruit-
ment program was built around
him at Detroit. Their schedule
was beefed up, and as soon as he
made a name for himself, he left,
and turned pro." Cases like this
one and Rick Mount, who dropped
out of Purdue as soon as his eli-
gibility expired, disgust Bay. "Ob-
ligations go both ways, and more
often than not,, it's the athlete
who forgets his obligations."
Apparently, Rick Bay and the
rest of the Michigan athletic de-
partment do a lot of work to be
sure that student-athletes here
remain what, they purport to be.
That it, students first and athletes
second. Bay is proud of Michigan's
tradition and national leadership
in that respect. "In terms of com-
bining the two, academics and
athletics, there is no place in the
country that can compare with
the record we have in producing
student-athletes. No other school
in the country can compare with
Michigan." ,
TURN OUT STARS

4<

-Assocated Press
Mayo wants your bod
"Just try and yfire me, you lowdown . . . ." seems to be what
underdog Detroit Tiger manager Mayo Smith is saying as he
points dramatically at a roving photographer. Mayo is expected
to get the axe this winter after the Tigers' horrendous 'play this
year.

l I-
East Stadium near Washtenaw 665-4471
State Street at North University 663-4121;
West Stadium near Liberty 665-8841

DROPPING the course is not the
easy solution, however. According
to Big Ten rules, to be able to
compete in a sport a player must
be passing 12 hours in any semes-
ter in which~ he competes. Michi-
gan, however, recommends that its
athletes take 15 or 16 hours a
semester for two reasons. First,

SmaliC
By MICHAEL OLIN
What college football team has
sent more of its graduates on to
the pros than any other team.?
Notre Dame? Southern Cal?
Texas? Alas, it is none of these.
The team that carries this dis-
tinction is a small southern school
known as Grambling College.
GRAMBLING is considered to
be, in sports jargon, one .of the
small colleges. There are liter-
ally hundreds ,of such small col-
leges across the country, with
names like Lamar Tech, Chico
State, Wofford, and of course,
none other than Slippery Rock.
Most of these teams are mem-
bers of the National Collegiate
Athletic Association, and as such,
follow basically the same rules as
any of the larger colleges. The
Associated Press even has a small
college football poll in which all
of the better small college teams
are ranked.
How does a school get to be a
small college? Actually, it's more
a matter of not, being a large col-,
lege. The NCAA has an odd system
for differentiating between t h e,

I'

colleges on the rise

I

I I

____WE D'T« WANT.
O.FOOL

THE ARTISTIC TOUCH
IN HAIR CUTTING
If you really are very particular about your hair care, experience
our considerate workmanship in cutting, styling; coloring, and
straightening by appointment at no extra charge. Positively no,
clipper work or razor cutting.
SHEARS & COMB BARBERSHOP
17s15 Washtenaw (Ypsi.)
Near Dairy Queen
484-0303
STRETCH WIGS-REDKENS PRODUCTS-MUSTACHE CUPS

i

( two. A small college remains so
until it plays 50 per cent of its
games against major established
competition. The problem arises
in that most "established compe-
tition" is unwilling to schedule a
small college.+ As a result, there
are some very large universities
that are still classified as small
colleges by the NCAA.
For- example, Eastern Michigan
(ranked seventh in the 1ta t e s t
small college poll) has a student
body of approximately 20,000. This
enrollment far exceeds that of
many of the so-called major insti-
tutions. In other words, the term
small college is more or less an
anachronism..
Some of the small colleges, like
number one ranked Arkansas'
State, operate on a big time level.
The Indians, last year's Peach
Bowl champs, have their own
stadium (seating capacity 8500)
and operate within a budget that
allows for a total of 70 scholar-
ships at any one time.
As far as recruiting talent to fill
these scholarships, Coach B e n
Ellender feels that he does have
certain advantages over the larg-
er schools. "For ,o e thing," he
states, "small col'e rules allow
freshmen t& play for the varsity.
Secondly, some athletes like t h e
tempo of a small school, and
thirdly, they feel they will play
faster here because we have fewer,
scholarships to award and there-'
fore, a smaller squad."
MOVING to the other side of the
spectrum, we find our old favorite,

Slippery Rock. They offer no
scholarships, only a number? of
"work jobs" which are similar to
the work study program at Mich-
igan. Coach Bob De Spirito offers
as his prime recruiting attraction
the curriculum that Slippery Rock
has to offer. According to De
Spirito, Slippery Rock has "thIbe
largest physical education pror
gram in the east."
Both coaches feel that they do
occasionally come up with' a real/
blue-chipper. As De, Spirito aptly
puts it, "Large schoolsoccasion-
ally get fooled. looking at the po-
tential of a high school All-stater.
He " could be at his full potential
in high school and may never de-
velop any further.'"
Ellender adds further, "A boy
may be passed over in high school
because he seems a bit clumsy.
Recruiters often misjudge in this
manner. Often, with a little work,
and a year or so further of phy-
sical maturity, this prospect may
develop into a fine player."
ACCORDINGLY, the small col-
leges play an integral part in the
NCAA football program. Often,
they act ais a developing ground
for the athlete who couldn o t
make it into the large college af-
ter high school, and yet, after four
years of further training, may de-
velop into a real professional pos-
sibility.
.As a result, without the small
college, we might never have
heard of players like Johnny Uni-
tas, Terry Bradshaw, Bob Hayes,
and many, mapy others like them.

1I '

' ..

... ..,..r. ............... ...............,.. ^

i

YOU }NOW WHAT HAS HAPPENED
IN EMP LOYMEN"TH IS YEAR.-
YOU ALSO ]KNOW THAT THE COM-
ING YEAR H0 LDS UNCERTA I NT"-
IES AS TO WHAT THE EMPLOY-
~MENTPOTENT IAL WILL BE~ WHEN
YOU GRADUATE.
LET'S ASSUME FOR A MINUTE
~THAT NCR DOESN' T HA VE A T
POSITION OPEN THAT' MEETS
0 ...~~-~~.YOUR INTERESTS AND ABILI-...........
IES WHEN YOU FINISH YOUR
~. EDUCAT ION. TiISDOESNhT~~........
o INEAN THAT' WE ARE NOT INT-
ERESTED IN IYOU. IT DOESN'T
MEAN WE WON'T Bi HIRING.
NCR HAS EiMPLOYED HUNDREDS
~~.OF ENGINEERS, ACCOUNTANTS............
RESEARG4CHEMISTS. COMPUTER
.-... SCIENCE PERSONNEL, MARKET-
ING OR SALES PERSONNEL, AND
PEOPLE WITH VARIOUS DIESCI-
PLINES IN RECENT YEARS. E
-u. INOWE W ILL BE NEEDING

C)

Bamboozle the Van Heusen
Body Shirt Snatcher!
Don't let her know where you buy Van
Heusen 417 Body Shirts! She'll only snatch
our supply of the best fitting body shirts
in town ... with the boldest stripes and
solids, the newest long point collar and
2-button cuffs. Don't tell her about us at ...

FI

Hi-Fi Studio
121 W'. Washington

668-7942

4U

ovtl is
Ile C

presents
GARRARD
the finest in record changers

gaJ4,

310 SOUTH STATE ST.

f,

Daily Classifieds Get Results

I

C)
(1

VANY SUCH PEOPLE EVEN THOUGH
THE NUMBERS MAY NOT BE~ GREAT~
WHEN YOU FINISH YOUR EDUCAT-
ION THIS YEAR. ~ AFTER ALL,..
SE ARE ONE OF THE WORLD'S
LARGEST-COMPANIES IN THE.~
COMPUTER SYSTEMS INDUSTRY.
THE COMPUTER-SYSTEMS--INDUS.
TRY I'S AMONG THE FASTEST
GKROW ING-INDUSTRIES INtHE
WORLD.

TRANSCENDENTIAL
MEDITATION

NCR WILL CONTINUE ITS CAM-

0

As Taught By
MvAHARISHI

a

THIS YEAR. THE SCHEDULE
.,...HAT. WE: CARRY-OUTWELL BE ..
LIMITED AND YOU MAY NOT HAVE
...- ....tHE OPPORTUNITYTO-TALK TO ~-~
US ON CAMPUS. NCR, THOUGH,
IS STILL INTERESTED-IN-YOU.
IF YOU CANNOT MEET US ON CAM-
PUS AND YOU-ARE INI'ERESTED-IN-~-..~.

MAHESH
YOGI

original works of graphic art-etchings, lithographs,-
by leading 20th century artists:
Pablo nPicasso JohnnvFriedlaender Marc Chaeva1

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan