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September 27, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-27

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September _27, 1970

PageEigh THEMICHGAN AIL

SHOOTINGS RECALLED:
Jackson State begins
term 'behinidl' a fence

Kent, sW
an uncertl

Continued from Page )
at all upon the returning stu-
dent' body of Jackson State Col-
lege.
"What I can't 'get" out of my
thoughts," said Rodney Brown,
a biology major from Gr e e n-
ville, "is that', they shot up a
girl's dorm. It would 'have been,
wrong shooting at a\boy's dorm.
But a girl's dorm ."
Mamie Davis Taplin sleeps in
the very dorm and says her
sleep is troubled nightly. ,She
is the college staff counselor
for the fifth floor.
."When I walk by the s p o t
out front where young Phillip
bled and died 'I see the grass
turn red,"
Anger remains an the Jack-
son State campus, submerged,
but there. Another emotion re-
mains as well.
Without excusing the police
- who raked the dormitory,
they say, in answer to sniper
fire-some students honetheless
have a vague feeling that possi-
bly a degree of senselessness on
their part contributed to the
tragedy as well.
"If it hadn't been for t h a t
bell, that silly bell, it might not
have happened at all," said
Linda Holden, a senior majoring
in sociology.
In fact, a bell never existed.
It was only an idea, a proposed,
gift to the school the senior
class would leave behind ac-
cording to college custom.
When the underclassmen got
wind of. the idea they turned
thumbs down. A bell, they said,
would be symbolic of John Bell
Williams, the governor. T h e y
held meetings. They printed
handbills: "To hell with the
bell." They defied the seniors
to try to hang ,a bell on the
campus
The seniors' resolve stiffened.
The squabble .grew hotter, spill-
ed out onto the sidewalks.
And this intramural dispute,
according to many students, on
a campus also aroused to vary-
ing degrees by the expansion of
the Indochina war, the draft,
the shootings at Kent State Un-

iversity, was the seed of the
rock-throwing disturbance that
sent police to Jackson State in
force.'
"Thd site of the damned tank
kind of got next to a lot of us,
too, I guess," says Ernest Mar-
tin, 'an English major. "The
tank is a big joke but it still
makes us mad they have it. The
only place they u s e it is on
Lynch Street -- when, they get
it to run.''
The "tank" is an elaborate
armored bus with gunports all
around, the, pride of the Jack-
son police. Students relish tell-
ing about the time its engine
went dead and it had to be tow-
ed back to the police station.
Whatever the cause, or caus-
es, of last spring's shootings, the
effect last week of that night of
terror was not the raging mili-
tancy some college officials seem
to expect.
Last Wednesday, the college
president felt compelled to is-
sue a memo to the college com-
munity reassuring one and all
that "there is no evidence of a
plan or plot to instigate organ-
ized unrest at Jackson S t a t e
College." But that, all the same,
a joint student-faculty "emer-
gency council" was being organ-
ized to head off potential trou-
ble because, "there is always the
lunatic fringe to'be dealt with."
"I expected m o r e militance
fropm kids, I certainly did," said!
Prof. Allan Brown, "but I have-
n't seen it.
On the first day of classes
Brown gave his chemistry stu-
dents an invitation. "I'm inter-
ested in last May's incident," he
said. "and I'm interested, in
black power and all black con-
cerns, and, I'd 1Ii k e to discuss
themr. But niot in this classroom.,
Anyone who wants to talk about~
those mattlers, see me after
class."
"Do you know what?" he' said.
a touch of disappointment in
his voice, "I had no takers, not
one, and that was out of a to-
tal of 119,students."

(Continued from Page 1)
All this week they came, th
cars filled with boxes and lamp
and hangers strung up in th
back seat. All this week, father
and brothers and boy friend.
helped the girls move into th
dormitories, and the window;
sprouted overnight with poster
proclaiming, "Live in Peace,'
and artificial flowers and color
ful mobiles. The campus way
coming alive again.
For the townspeople who hav
no direct 'contact with the uni
versity, this year's students in
vasion brought resentment. Fo
the university people, it mean
apprehension. For the rest o
the community, concern tem
pered with hope that the coo
heads on campus could keep th
campus cool.
The worst enemy, everyon
agrees, is the rumor mill. Ther
is, for instance, a rumor thatc
vigilante posse of townspeople:
ready for vengeance if the stu
dents go wild downtown as the
did last May. There is the rumo
that 7,000 radicals are trans
ferring to Kent from CaliforriE
and Wisconsin to liven up the
fall semester. There is a rumo
a radical group will shut dow:
the university by Oct. 16.
For campus police chief Don
aId Schwartzmiller the job is t
separate fact from rumor. Fact;

dents f*nd
'ai ncam npns
there are bomb threats. Fact:
e there was an influx of hippie
s types over the summer living
e in tent communes in the county
s and in ghetto housing in town.
Is Fact : There are a number of
1e symbolic events scheduled for
i the coming week that could pro-
'S vid4a the fnr c fnr t mhl,-A

le.
I-
-
r
it
)f
1-
ol
e
e
e
a
is
z-
y
)r
s-

v e e ocus r Lrou e-a
memorial service tomorrow for
the dead students; the appear-
ance of one of the wounded
students, Dean Kahler, in a
wheelchair, paralyzed from the
waist down by a National Guard
bullet; "Think Week," a sched-
ule of involvement sessions;
homecoming weekend, Oct. 10.
and two concerts by a top rock
group, the Jefferson Airplane.
The county has broken up a
couple of the tent communes
that were on public land. No one
is certain if and how many more
exist. And, "people downtown
are very apprehensive about
what may happen." Still the
stores wear signs that say, "A
Kent Chamber of Commerce
member welcomes the students
of Kent State University."

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-,
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and, by 2 p.m. Friday for
saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 27
Day Calendar,
C' oral Union Series: Detroit Sym-
phony Orchestra: Sixteen Ehrling, con-
ductor and Judith Raskin, soprano solo-
ist, Hill Aud., 2:30 p.m.
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28
Chinese and Japanese Studies and
Center for So. and Southeast A s i a n
Studies Lecture: R. P. Sinha, U. of
Glasgow, "Comparative Analysis of
Traditional Agriculture in India, China,
Japan, and Implications for Develop-,
metn Strategy": 200 Lane Hali, 4 p.m.
Physics Seminar: S. Wilson. "The Re-
action n plus p to pio plus d plus Iso-
topic Spin Invariance," P&A Colloq.
Rm., 4 p.m.
Presidenit's State of the University
Address: President Fleming will give the
"Annual Address to Faculty and Staff"
in Rackham Lecture Hall at 8 p.m. Dis-
tinguished Faculty Awards and Uni-

versity Press Book Award for 1970 will
be presented following President Flem-
ing's address. A reception in the Mich-
igan League Ballroom will follow the
address and award ceremonies. The
meeting will be open to all members
of the University community.
Foreign Visitors
Dr. Khalil Mazhar; Cairo, UAR can be
reached in Rooms 22-24, Michigan3Un-
ion (764-2148), Sept. 27 - Oct. 3.

Haircuts that
don't look
like haircuts
TRY US-
DASCOLA
UM BARBERS,
E. Univ. off South U.
Read and Use
Daily Clasi fieds

Applications still being taken to fill
Two Vacancies on Student Government Council
(member -at-[orea seatsf
Sign up for interviews (to be held Tues., Sept. 29)
and fill out opplications at 1546 Student Activities
Bldg. Students from all schools and colleges are

01i

r
.n c
CI IR~CIL 1EIBOO 0IKS
.ok
Zen, Yo g, Tarot
AlchemY, Astrology, T heos;ophy.
Tarot, Magic. Parapsychology
Macrobiotics and Health Food Books
215 S. STATE... 2nd Floor
S A.M 8:30P.M. 769-1583

A Mademoiselle representative will be
in room 3G of the Union, Sept. 29, 1
p.m. to discuss guest editorships and "
college board competition.
TESTING AND APPLICATION
DEADLINES
Inquire at Career Planning for ap- ANNOUNCING THE OPENING OF A
plications and further information,
Miss Webber, 764-6338. N STORE I ANN p
Next Federal Service Entrance Exam NEW ADRBO
apply Nov. 5, test Nov. 15. No test in
.Dec.
Last NSA ttes
Last NSA test all this year, apply j
Nov. 21, test Dec. 6.
Next Peace Corps Test, Nov. 15, 4
1:30, Post Office, Main at Catherine sts.
s-
Domestic and Imported Leather
1311 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
(Next to the Village Bell)
Try Daily Classifieds ,~'.....,..
U UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN' .
JUDO CLUB
£4
.
COEDUCATIONAL
4th DEGREE BLACK BELT INSTRUCTOR
BEGINNERS Start: Wednesday, Sept. 30 17
ITERMEDIATE 7 e5-:' PM
ADANE. 7:1-:15-: P.M.
veekIy Schedtde.I FRI 7:00-8:00 P.M.
IM Bhdg.-WRES TLING IRM.

I

4

PRESENTS
PAT and VICTORIA
GARVEY
... Epic Recording Artists
. Gee, it's a lovely picture, Mrs., Custer-Sorry
things turned out that way for George ..
FRI., SAT., SUN. Doors
SEPT. 25-27, $2.00 E

NEW
U of M DRINKING GAME
Reg. 7.50
Special Price,'6f98
also

Black White -
Dirty Water

Cities Games

Smog

ORDER YOUR POMPS EA R LY
20%J discount to U of M groups
Facts and Fun
224 S. MAIN

ri1

1

h

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily
MO

I

i

CINEM A

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DID
You
KNOW ...

presents

irr

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S

A STEIN FULL OF FEIN FILM FOR YOU

T'

I Immmr-

ANN ARBOR FISH MARKET
IS THE ONLY PLACE IN TOWN THAT REGULARLY CARRIES.:

Sun.
Sept. 27

7:00 p.m.-BACKORPHEUS
9:00 p.m.-BLACK ORPHEUS

.
"
"
"
0
0
0
0

Lobster Tails
Scallops
Swordfish
Halibut
Fresh Tuna,
Red ,Snapper
White Fish
(Fresh and, smoked)
Walleye Pike
Lake Trout

" White Bass
* Fresh Salmon
" Lox
* Flounder
" Buffalo
" Butteer Fish
" Sole
", Smelt
" Chubs

" Smoked Sable
" Millet
" Lake Perch
10 Ocean Perch
" Cat Fish
" Haddock
" Herring
* Kippers
" Squid

0 Sardines

f
'0
"
,
"

Marine Sprats
Salt Mackerel
Salt Cod Fish
King Crab
Frog Legs
Smoked Oysters
Chopped Clams
Smoked Clams

*PLEASE NOTE TIME CHANGES-tickets go on sale for each
show at 6:30 p.m. the night of the show. A separate adJmission
will be charged for each performance.
A IT A -AANIET T I-HA I.

Fresh Fish and Shell Fish Every Day
A rn mor

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