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September 26, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-26

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Millet hits sex roles

_.

11

NEED A FAST
CEANIG JOBLIO
* One hour service
0 Drive thru pick up
Low prices
" Open Saturday
COME SEE 'US SOON
A&P One hour cleaners
312 E. Huron-Across from city hall
OPEN: Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat. 7 a.m.-5 p.m.
CALL 668-9500

NEW YORK (AP) - Feminist au-
thor Kate Millett said yesterday
that all women seeking a career
in the arts must overcome "the
enemy within" - a self doubt she
says is imposed on women by his-
tory and society,
"Hamlet is thie human condi-
tion; Ophelia is just a girl who
didn't get married," said the 36-
year-old writer, charging women
in the artsare not considered peo-
ple in their own right, but treated
as "adjuncts to men."
Dr. Millett, author of "Sexual
Politics," commented at the final
session of a five-day hearing on
the status of women conducted by

the City Commission on Human
Rights.
Others appearing before the
p a n e 1 included anthropologist
Margaret Meade, women's libera-
tion activist Betty Freidan, Rep.
Shirley Chisholm (D-N.Y.) a n d
experts in the fields of welfare
reform, tax law and psychology.
Mrs. Chisholm, the nation's
first b l a c k woman member oi
Congress, said yesterday that a
special fund should be created to
help finance involvement by wo-
men in politics.
Her testimony supported earlier
remarks by Commission Chairman
Eleanor Holmes, who said women
should organize a political coati-

tion "equal in organization to any
lobby Congress has ever seen."
Extensive tax reform for work-
ing mothers was urged by Colum-
bia University tax law professor
George Cooper. He said a married
woman with two children w h o
earns $5,000 a year is left with
only $635 to add to the family's
income after paying various ex-
penses such as her taxes, carfare I
and child care.
The take-home pay could be
tripled, Cooper said, through a
series of tax reforms, including
elimination of joint returns, de-
ductions for child care expenses '
and reduced Social Security de- WOMEN MAR
ductions. Day saw mar

RCH in New York to bring attention to their demand for equa
ches and rallies in many major cities on Aug. 26.

page three

.aat11t

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
B SINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, September 26, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

U

LAST NIGHT!
JOHNNY AND THE HURRICANES
BEGINNING MONDAY
STANLEY MITCHELL
nd the
Peoples' Choice
specializing in Soul and Rock for 'your listening and
dancing pleasure
Open 7 days a week from 11 A.M. to 2 A.M.
Fine Food 761-3548
c 3 P.M. to 1 Ali. 314 S. Fourth
every day Ave..

*Sa -Sun.,r Sept. 26-21
BREATH LESS,
dir. JEAN-L UC GODAR D (1959)
Godard's first film, and some say
his best.'
1 & 9:05 Architecture
75c
662-8871 Auditorium

ne ws briefs
By The Associated Press
A WEEK-OLD ELECTRICAL CRISIS continued yesterday as
New York City had voltage cut back for the fourth day in a row.
Consolidated Edison again cut back its voltage, and other utilities
in the eastern New York State also reduced power five per cent yes-
terday.
In New York, the crisis reached its peak on Tuesday, when Con,
Edison blacked out 90,000 homes on Staten Island and in Westchester
County to conserve a rapidly dwindling power supply.
The power drain on the nation's largest city was expected to de-
crease over the weekend with the shutdown of business and industry.
Elsewhere, the restoration of broken down generating units did
much to ease the pressure on utility companies, as power demands
went into a weekend decline.
And the New England Electric system reported through a spokes-
man that "the present facilities can more than handle the require-
ments with an adequate reserve."
* * *
CAMBODIAN TROOPS closed in yesterday on the Communist
force which has stalled a major government offensive for nearly
two weeks.
Two wedges of Cambodian troops closed in yesterday in an at-
tempt to divide the strong Communist forces dug in at the village
Taing Kauk.
In the Cambodian fighting, Taing Kauk must be reclaimed if the
Cambodians are to achieve the goal of their offensive: to push north
to the provincial capital of Kompong Thom, clearing Highway 6 and
reclaiming an important part of central Cambodia.
Meanwhile, the U.S. Command in Vietnam announced that the
remaining elements of the 199th Infantry Brigade had begun a with-
drawal of 5,000 men as part of President Nixon's fourth-phase cutback
of .50,000 troops.
NGUYEN CAO KY, vice-president of South Vietnam, might
be advised against coming to the U.S., Washington sources in-
dicated yesterday.
Dr. Henry A. Kissinger, national security adviser to President
Nixon, will leave for Paris next Saturday to confer with U.S. nego-
tiators at the Vietnam peace talks. Ky is expected to be in Paris then
also, and a meeting between them seems highly probable.
Washington officials did not say directly if Kissinger planned
to advise Ky about his planned trip to the U.S. to appear at a
Vietnam rally Oct. 3.
They did hint, though, that Ky's appearance in the U.S. might
cause embarrassment to the administration.
* *
THE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT for direct election
of the President will face an important test on Tuesday.
Sen. Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.), the majority leader, filed the
cloture petition to stop debate on the amendment. Last week a
previous cloture petition was six votes short of the two thirds majority
needed for passage.
Sen. Mansfield described the upcoming vote on Tuesday as a
"momentous occasion." He said that he will send telegrams to his
fellow Democrats to vote on Tues.
Sen. Hugh Scott (R-Pa), the minority leader, said he didn't.
expect the petition to pass. Scott also signed the petition.

base in

Cuba

WASHINGTON {M)-- The Pentagon said yesterday it has
solid indications that the Soviet Union is building a perman-
ent submarine base in Cuba.
A White House official, who preferred to remain anony-
mous, said the U.S. would view a strategic installation there
"with utmost seriousness."
The Defense Department 'did not rule out the possibility
that the facility reported under development may be designed
to support missile-firing subs now cruising off U.S. waters.
The White House official drew a parallel with the Cuban
missile crisis of 1962, when

-Associated Press)
Search fo~r bank robber
Policemen from the Boston area line up to join in the search for
William M. Gilday, who is suspected of slaying a policeman during
a bank holdup Wednesday. Gilday is one of four suspects sought.
in connection with the holdup and slaying.
POSSIBLE DANGER:
rAECreconsieders
radla tion waste site

*4

WASHINGTON (P) - The
Atomic E n e r g y Commission,
caught between pressure to save
money and fear of another up-
roar over safety, is taking a sec-
ond look at a radioactive waste
storage plan once criticized as
"in its essence dangerous."
Under Project Bedrock, mil-
lions of gallons of hot, highly
radioactive substances would be
poured into man-made caverns
in the bedrock 1,500 'feet below
the AECeinstallation at Savan-
nah River, S.C., and kept there
for the 1,000 or so years it
would continue to emit radio-
activity.
The project was stalled ini the
furor touched off when a Na-
tional Academy of Sciences
committee said it seemed possi-
ble the mud-like waste could
ooze through the undiscovered
fissures in the bedrock and
eventually contaminate the Sa-
vannah River.

Soviets charged
wihbidg

A majority of the committee
recommended that Project Bed-
rock be dropped and more effort
be concentrated on solidifica-
tion of liquid waste and storage
in salt mines in Kansas. How-
,ever,some members disagreed
and recommended further re-
search into Project Bedrock.
The AEC had budgeted $1.3
million two years ago for re-
search into feasibility of Pro-
ject Bedrock. But that money
ias never spent following the
disclosure last year of the NAS
report, which also criticized.
waste handling at other AEC
installations.
Instead, AEC spokesmen push-
ed the advantages of salt mine
storage in appearances before
congressional committees and
began developinent of a reposi-
tory in mines near Lyons, Kan.
This salt mine project is con-'
tinuing. But for the radioactive
liquid now stored in huge tanks
at Savananah River, the AEC
estimates solidification a n d
shipment to Kansas would cost
about 10 times more than devel-
oping bedrock storage.

President John F. Kennedy
said peace in the Caribbean
could be preserved only if So-
viet offensive weapons were
removed from the area and
were kept out in the future.
Kennedy's statement remains
U.S. policy, the White House of-
ficial said.
That Soviet ships have moved
barges and other' equipment into
the harbor at Cienfuegos over the
past few weeks "makes us feel
they m a y be seeking sustained
capabilities in the area," Pentagon
spokesman Jerry W. Friedheim
announced.
Asked if the base is intended to
support Russia's new Yankee-
class submarines, each of which
carries 16 missiles and is similar
to the U.S. Polaris subs, Fried-
heim replied "We can't rule out
that possibility."
The White House official said
such submarines clearly would be
offensive in nature and thus would
bring into play the policy Ken-
nedy enunciated.
He added that this country
"would view the establishment of
a strategic base in, the Caribbean
with utmost seriou'sness."
He said no representations on
the subject have yet been made to
the Soviet Union, adding that the
United States isnkeeping c 1 o s e
watch to determine what kind of
weapons could be based at the
site where activity has been spot-
ted.
"At the right moment," the ad-
ministration official said, the,
United States "will take the action
that seems indicated."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the Universit vof
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

Avi ation
security,
tighteneda
WASHINGTON (P)-The Nixon
administration toug h e ne d its
stanld against hijackers yesterday,
warning that federal guards will
not hesitate to shoot if all else
fails in halting an airline hijacker.
"We will do everything in our
power to prevent shooting on the
plane,",said Secretary of Trans-
portation John A. Volpe. "Shoot-
ing will be done as a last resort."
He added, however, that "When
it comes to the lives of 200 Amer-
ican passengers and crewmen as
opposed to the life of a hijacker,
there is no question of what we're
going to do."
Volpe's remarks came as he
signed an agreement with the
Justic'e Department that gives
jurisdictional responsibilityhf o r
hijackings to the FBI while a
plane is on the ground, and to
the Federal Aviation Administra-
tion when it is in the air.
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell
signed for the Justice Department
while FBI Director J. Edgar Hoov-
er and retired Lt. Gen. Benjamin
0. Davis Jr., President Nixon's di-
rector of civil aviation security,
looked on.
Mitchell told newsmen that the
memorandum of understanding
merely formalizes current proce-
dures, ,but should eliminate un-
certainty in a crisis situation.
The guards, who include FBI
and Treasury agents and FAA air
marshals, will be supplemented by
military personnel trained in han-
dling potential hijackings, Volpe
said. At least. some of the mili-
tary men should be on the planes
within a week, he said.
Hoover said FBI agents acting
as airliner guards will carry reg-
ular sidearms. He said the FBI
will exchange intelligence infor-
mation concerning hijackers or
potential hijackers with govern-
ments of other countries.

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