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September 25, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-25

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Famous PIZZA & CHIKKE
from
THOMPSON'S PIZZA
211 ELAN N ST. (Next to Armory)
cA LL 761-0001

Friday, September 25, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

FREE DELIVERY-7 Days a Week-FREE DELIVERY
" MASI'IS THE BEST
AMERICAN WAR
COMEDY SIN E
SOUND CAME
d -PauineKaei.
* EU S New Yorker
20th Centuy fo presents.
jLIj Sj 1 1 An ingo Preminger Production
DONALD SUTHERLAND ELLIOTT GOULD TOM SKERRITT
CoStmng SArKitLRMAN -ROBERTtI -VAt0-JO ANN Pr UG- mEAURONOIS
Produced by Directed by Screenplay by
bINGO PREMINGER ROBERT ALTMAN RING LARONER,k r
From a noel by fMWD H00 R Muic by jOHINY MANDt . = A'
Color by DE LUXE@ PANAVISION9 .^
GNOWSHOWING
SHOW TITMES
TODAY
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782.7:00-:10
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor SATURDAY and SUNDAY
Box office open 6:30 1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:30
3 Gripping NOW Plo! ys!

news briefs
By The Associated Press
THE FORMAL U.S..;REPLY to the recent "new peace initi-
ative" offered by the Viet Cong a week ago was given yesterday
by David K. E. Bruce.
Bruce, the U.S. ambassador to the Vietnam peace talks in Paris,
said Washington will not impose any government on Saigon and left
the door open for further talks on military questions.
A Viet Cong representative' labeled Bruce's reply "entirely
negative.,
* *
CAMBODIA'S LATEST OFFENSIVE, its largest of the six-
month war, was stopped yesterday by Communist troops.
Up to 6,000 Cambodian troops were isolated from their supply
base when saboteurs blew up three bridges behind them.
The fighting took place about 50 miles north of Phnom Penh,
Cambodia's capital. Cambodian officials said they did not know
when the offensive would resume.
* a, *
FBI AGENTS FAILED once again yesterday in their efforts
to capture the four young men accused of bombing the Army
Mathematics Research Center at the University of Wisconsin
at Madison.
The latest false alarm was the detention of three men in Hills-
boro, Texas by the Texas Department of Public Safety, acting on the
request of the FBI.
. The four men have been on the FBI's most wanted list since
the Aug. 24 bombing which killed a graduate student, injured three
others and caused extensive property damage.
* * *
MOON SOIL arrived yesterday in the Soviet Union, carried
by the-unmanned Luna 16.
Soviet scientists hailed the all-mechanical feat as equal to the
U.S. Apollo moon landings.
The 11-day mission of the complex cosmic craft ended as re-
covery teams tracked the capsule through the earth's atmosphere
and picked it up in Soviet Kazakhstan.
AVAILABLE EVIDENCE "strongly indicates" that insiders of
the money-troubled Penn Central Railroad may have violated
federal securities laws, said a House member yesterday.
' Acting chairman of the House Commerce investigations sub-
committee, Rep. Torbert Macdonald (D-Mass.), emphasized however,
that he was not taking the position that violations had actually
occurred.
AN ALLEGED AIRLINE HIJACKER was being returned from
Cuba to the United States yesterday, reported the State Depart-
ment.
This is the first time that Cuba has directly sent such a person
back to the country.
The man being returned was identified as Robert J. Labadie, a
former U.S. army private who was indicted in South Bend, Ind., on
Sept. 10 on charges of aircraft piracy and kidnapping.

Official
charges
U.S. bias
WASHINGTON (IP) - The gov-
ernment's top job rights officer
accused U.S. labor Thursday of
"playing all those cards" of its in-
fluence in Congress to avoid open-
ing its unions fully to nonwhites.
"They feel they have a lot of-
friends on the Hill; they put a lot
of money into congressional cam-
paigns," Assistant Secretary of
Labor Arthur A. Fletcher told a
House subcommittee.
As a result, there is a wide-
spread feeling in government, he
said, that even though equal op-
portunity programs are backed by
President Nixon, labor will be able
to maintain white-favoring mem-
bership practices through friends
on keycongressional committees.
"Labor is playing all those
cards," he said. "It's playing all
those cards, to be blunt with you.
"I've found that labor unions
have been jawboning on civil
rights and lining up with Congress
on civil rights bills for so long
that they feel they're above and!
beyond having to comply them-
selves." he said. "Now the moment
of truth has come . .. They
aren't being very cooperative."
Fletcher testified before a House
Armd r mdServicessubcommittee
studying the effects of federal
equal opportunity programs on
defense contracts.
Fletcher also told the subcom-
mittee he had just learned that a
nationwide industry which he-
would not publicly name is op-
erating under a union contract1
that excludes nonwhites.
He said the Office of Contract
Compliance under his jurisdiction
will investigate.
"This keeps minorities out of
this industry across the country,"
he said. "It's just about impossible
for them (the industry) to be in
compliance."
Chairman Charles H. Wilson
(D-Calif.) said his subcommittee
has found no evidence that the
quality of defense work is being
reduced by federal requirements,
that contractorshirerand train
minority workers-although com-
panies say the training programs
will increase contract costs.

-Associated Press
Feminine frisk
A San Francisco woman allows a female customs inspector to,.
search her for weapons before she is permitted to board an air-
plane flight at Kennedy Airport. Searches before and after flights
have become de rigeur for the international traveler.
THOUSANDS LAID OFF-

Tals on
railroad
resume
WASHINGTON RI-Railroad
negotiators resumed talks in
the longstanding dispute over
firemen's jobs yesterday with
the threat of a nationwideyail
strike put off for two weeks.
Secretary of Labor J. D. Hodg-
son announced that the AFL-CIO
United Transportation Union and
rail industry officials had agreed
to the two-week reprieves in the
early morning hours after'a 12:01
a.m. strike threat deadline had
expired,
President Nixon's power to delay
a strike under existing law al-
ready had run out.
There was no striking on the
nation's rait system in the inter-
val of some 90' minutes between
the expiration of the deadline and
the agreement for a two-week
postponement.
"Naturally I am disappointed
that no settlement was reached
but I am appreciative of, the fact
that further opportunity for nego-
tiations now exists without an im-
mediate threat of a strike," Hodg-
son said.
Only Congress could compel a
return to work if the dispute re-
sults in a walkout after the new
deadline expires at 12:01 a.m.
Oct. 8.
Talks have centered on a possi-
ble compronmise solution under
which the fireman's job would be
combined with that of the brake-
man.
The railroad industry won from.
Congress' several years' ago the
right to eliminate some 20,000
firemen's jobs, leaving a b o ut
18,000. Many of the men whose
jobs were eliminated were given
other railroad jobs, or severance
pay.
The union has contended it has
the right to demand all the jobs
be restored since the 1963 special
act, of Congress underwhich they
were' slashed has expired.
The union argues the fireman
is needed in the locomotive cab
as a safety lookout, but the in-
dustry says the men haven't been
needed since the advent of the
diesel engine many years ago.
"The firemen's union now wants
to turn the clock back. to the
steam engine era," said the in-
dustry's National Railway Labor
COnfererice.
The dispute has involved the
federal courts,, the White House
and Congress,'including the 1963
law, since the railroad industry
first began pressing for elimina-
tion of firemen in 1959.

Auto suppliers .it by
continuing GM strike

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SUBSCRIBE NOW! DISCOUNTS
Friday, Sept. 251
Masculin-Feminin
Dir. JEAN-LUC GODARD (1961)
A film about the children of Marx
and Coca-Cola,
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8871 75C Auditorium
__1

U' Indians organize group for
advancement of opportunities

By CHRIS PARKS
Seeking to strengthen the po-
sition of the red man in Ameri-
ca, members of the American
Indians Unlimited have, ac-
cording to their declaration,
"organized to remove the myth
of the 'vanishing American'."
Formed last spring, and pres-
ently the only Indian organiza-
tion on campus, the group has
dedicated itself to the goals of
"cultural, economic, and social
advancement" for Indians.
One of the major programs of
the group is increasing educa-
tional opportunities for Indians
at the college level. Paul John-
son, a leader of the organiza-
tion, says t h a t although the
University awards f i v e Indian
scholarships per year, these are
hard to obtain due to the diffi-

culty of proving legally that one
is, in fact, an Indian.
A program to recruit Indians
has been initiated by Eastern
Michigan University, according
to Aster Simpson, a student at
Eastern. However, S i m p s o n
stresses that the program is, in
his opinion, inadequately fund-
ed.
He went on to say that if
scholarship funds were n o t
forthcoming, research would be
done to determine if EMU got
its land originally as a grant
from Indians. If so, he men-
tioned the possibility of court
action against the University to
obtain these funds.
Johnson says the group's cul-
tural program is also a vital
part of its operation. "People
right now are stressing educa-
tion," he said, "yet we're trying

to educate our own people to
the ways we have, our own re-
ligion, our own feeling to unify
us, to know what our true heri-
tage is."
The third major program of
the group is increased employ-
ment opportunities for Indians.
Construction worker Stan Mor-
seau characterized Indians as
"Willing workers if t h e y are
given work." The group, Mor-
seau says, is working on - pro-
grams to keep young Indians in
school, to increase their chand-
es of gaining adequate, mean-
ingful employment.'
The American Indians Unlim-
ited plans two events for the
near future. The first is an au-
tograph session with Vine De-
laria, author of the book, Cus-
tard Died for Your Sins, which
will be co-sponsored by the
- Centicore bookstore on October\
4th.
The other event is an open
house on Indian culture at the
Ann Arbor Public Library on
October 30th. This open house
will include poetry, dancing,
and bead and leather work pro-
vided principally by local resi-
dents.

DETROIT ( P) - Employers in
the tire, metals and transporta-
tion industries laid off more work-
ers yesterday as the effects of a
10-day-old United Auto Workers'
strike against General Motors
Corp. spread.
One of the anticipated effects
of the labor dispute surfaced yes-
terday in Detroit as GM of-
ficials announced an average price
increase for its 1971 cars of $136
per car over current prices.
The corporaiton held the door
open forhstillahigher1971.prices,
saying that at the conclusion of
the strike car prices "will be re-,
viewed in the light of prevailing
economic factors and competitive
conditions in the marketplace."
Many supplier firms and o t h e r
businesses dependent upon GM
business admitted the loss of busi-
ness was hurting, but said they
were holding off on layoffs in
hopes of a settlement.
The economic impact of the
strike - estimated by GM to be
$100 million, a day in loss to the
U.S. and Canadian economies -
has slowed production of the U.S.
Gross National Product (GNP) by
11/2 per cent, a Nixon administra-
tion adviser estimated.
General Motors has estimated
that its suppliers are losing $40
million a day in sales because of
the strike.
Herbert Stein, one of three
members of the President's Coun-
cil of Economic Advisers, said,
however, that the strike will pro-
bably not have much effect on the
Nixon administration's efforts to
control inflation and revive econ-
omic growth.
The union did not strike 27 GM
facilities which make parts. for
Ford and Chrysler Corp. One of
those exempted plants - Delco
Electronics at Kokomo, Ind.-was
added to the strike list Thursday.
GM has laid off 30,162 of the 73,500
employes at the exempted facili-
ties.
------ .

Signs of an early settlement were
not apparent, said officials of
the United Auto Workers union
which called the strike at mid-
night,,Sept. 14.
Negotiators met briefly Thurs-
day but did not discuss any of
the major issues separating the
two sides. Another session was
scheduled for Thursday, but only
noneconomic issues were on the
agenda.
UAW pickets have forced cur-
tailment of work by outside con-
tractors, in some instances. Robert
Sallen, vice president of Acorn.
Iron Works Inc., Detroit, said
two steel fabrication jobs under
way at GM facilities have been
halted because his union steel-
workers have refused to cross the
UAW pidket lines. A few men at
Acorn have already been laid off
because of the work interruption.

Baits food problem
allayed a't Commons

By PAUL RUSKIN
Some 200 Baits residents who
have been without meal con-
tracts since the semester began
can now purchase contracts
from the North Campus Com-
mons dining room, University
Housing Director John Feld-
kamp has announced.
This action was taken to pro-
vide food service for the Baits
residents who are unable to pur-
chase meal contracts from Burs-
ley.
Bursley and Baits are both lo-
cated in the North Campus
housing complex, but Baits has
no cafeteria service.
According to Feldkamp, the
meal problem arose when 800
Baits residents applied for meal
contracts at Bursley - 200
above the limit for which Burs-
ley can supply food.

Baits residents complained
that the official University
Housing booklet states that stu-
dents from Baits would be al-
lowed to purchase meal con-
tracts at Bursley.
The residents rejected earlier.
this term an offer f r o m the
Housing Office to buy m e a 1-
contracts at dorms on central
campus.
The announcement that food
contracts will be available at
the Commons came as a surprise
since the Commons' restaurant
is privately owned and has nev-
er before agreed to provide food
service at the lower prices that
students pay in the dorms. Af-
ter the meeting, representatives
of Baits residents agreed to
"give Commons a chance for the
'first few days of next week."

Conspire to, Come!
PLOT WITH CHICAGO 7'S OWN
Win. KUNSTLER

I

--mm

Hear Kunstler Sept. 27

CHAEKHOV'S
THE GRASSHOPPER
A SOVIET FILM VERSION OF THE STORY AWARDED
AT VENICE FILM FESTIVAL
"Apart from creating impeccable period background, beau-
tifully observed and felt, Samsonov handles the narrative
with a nicely judged subtlety and irony. He has caught the
difficult Chekhovian balance to perfection; the film is both
sophisticated and touching. The casting is almost faultless."
-Sight and Sound

Sunday Evening-8:O--Hill Aud.
Tickets: $1.25
- DIAG-Main Desk, Union-At Door

OPEN 12:45 P.M.
SHOWS at 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.
Program Info: 662-6264
THE LANDLORD'S
GETTING JUST ABOUT
EVERYTHING BUT THE RENT.
Watch,
the landlo
get his.
.
-S...S

State & Liberty Sts.
HELD I OVER!

Now

lowm@Mmmwmommqmqk

)rd

I

RHIGHES
RAING!
LIZA RATES OSCAR IN TOP DRAMA"
-DAILY NEWS
amoe

i

I

U of M Students for HART
need your help for a
REGISTRATION DRIVE
This is the political work that gets votes!
COME TO THE SAB LOBBY
Either FRIDAY, SEPT. 25 at 7:00 P.M.
orSATURDAY, SEPT. 26 at 11:00 A.M.
Call 761-8825 for more iAfo
PRESENTS
-PAT anl \/ICTORIA

THE MIRISCH
PRODUCTION COMPANY
presents
A NORMAN JEWISON-HAL ASHBY
- -l 10T]OKI

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.

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