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September 23, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-23

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Wednesday, September 23, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Pirates- split
on this and that
Cheers for Cazzie,
and a moment of silence
eric siegel
CAZZIE RUSSELL returns h o m e tomorrow night for the
Knicks-Pistons exhibition game and the odds are good that
the cheers for him will fill cavernous Crisler Arena the way they
used to fill cozy old Yost Field House.
The cheers will be a fitting tribute"to the king of Michigan
basketball. In three years here, Russell, with his deft touch, and
clutch-shooting put the Wolverines into the national hardcourt
spotlight. When Russell csa m e to Michigan, the Wolverines
hadn't won a conference basketball title in 16 years. By the time
he left, Michigan won three - the only Big Ten team in history
to win three consecutive conference titles.
In his first varsity game, Cazzie scored 30 points. Shoot-
ing from all over the court, he averaged 26.1 points a game
his sophomore year, and won All-American honors. By the
time he completed his final season two years later, he was
averaging 33.5 points a game and had two more All-Ameri-
can honors to his credit.
Cazzie was not only a great shooter, he was a clutch-shooter
and a great leader, too. In his junior year, when he was leading
Michigan to a 13-1 conference record and a second place in the
NCAA's, he won games at least half a dozen times with clutch
baskets in the last seconds of the game. When the pressure wa
on, when there was a basket to be made, the Wolverines went to
ft Russell, and he seldom let them down.
He was known as a great-shooter, but he could rebound,
too. When the Wolverines stopped Duke's 27 game home-court
winning streak in 1964, Russell pulled in 12 rebounds, in addi-
tion to hitting for 21 points.
Associate Athletic Director Dave Strack, who coached
the Wolverines during the Russell era, remembers Cazzie as,
"the most dedicated athlete I ever knew. He had natural
talent, but he also had great detehnination."
The natural talent was what impressed the college scouts
when Cazzie was a Chicago high-school All-American. Michi-
gan coach -Johnny Orr, who was coaching at Wisconsin at the
time, remembers th'e recruiting battles over Cazzie. "Hveryone
was trying to recruit him," Orr says, "and I had the feeling
then that if a Big Ten team got Cazzie, that team would win
the conference championship."
Strack also remembers that "everyone wanted Cazzie very
badly - including Michigan." In an effort to get him, Strack
enlisted the help of the Wolverines' own recruiters and some
alumni in the Chicago area. He also brought Cazzie to Ann Ar-
bor, and had him tour the campus with a 6-7, 232 pound fresh-
man center from Detroit named Bill Buntin.
"Bill and Cazzie hit it off right away," Strack says. "I
think that's probably one of the reasons he came here."
The campus tour was the first thing Russell and Buntin
shared, but it was not the last. In 64-65, Russell and Bun-
tin shared -spots on the first team All-American squad. With
Buntin averaging 24.5 points a game, and Cazzie hitting at
a 26.1 clip, they became the highest scoring tandem in Big
Ten history.
The followingyear, Buntin and Russell shared the confer-
ence MVP award - an award Cazzie got singularly in '66-67 -
and were named All-Americans for the second straight year.
"Buntin was a super-rebounder who could kill you on the
boards," Orr says, recalling the Michigan-Wisconsin games of
the early '60's. "He could board with anyone in the country, and
his second and third efforts were simply outstanding. He got a
lot of baskets, too - Cazzie was a great feeder, and Billy was
a good shooter."
The statistics bear Orr's recollections out. They also
show that Buntin didn't take long to assert himself as a
star. He led the Big Ten in rebounding as a sophomore with
a 15.4 average and was fourth in scoring that year, averag-
ing 23.5 points a game, and made the all-Big Ten team at
center. He set conference scoring marks as a sophomore, but
his record held only one year, until Cazzie came along and
broke it.
Despite all his.honors and accolades, Buntin, unlike Russell,
was never heavily recruited Awhen he was at Detroit Northern,
the main reason being that he broke his leg in the second game
of his senior year and was forced to sit out the rest of the sea-
son.
But the previous summer, a teacher at the school called and
told Strack he knew a big fellow who could play ball. Strack
1 went to Detroit and saw him play in a summer league at Brew-

ster Center. "I liked his size and then I saw him play and I lik-
ed that, too," Strack/says. "When Michigan got Billy," Orr says,
"they were on their way back."
Russell and Buntin had far different histories when
they left Michigan. Cazzie became one of the top subs on
the now defending world champion New York Knicks; Bun-
tin died of a heart attack in 1968, two years after he left
Michigan, after playing basketball in a gym in Detroit.
Orr, who 'took the head coaching job after both Russell and
Buntin had left, says he found that. "Everyone loved Bill Buntin.
He was the type of person who would do anything for anyone."
Strack remembers the setting up o'f a fund to aid Buntin's
family shortly after his death. "A lot of his friends and people'
who were interested in sports helped, as well as a lot of other
people who admired him as a person and were concerned for
his family."

Mets
By The Associated Press
PITTSBURGH - The Pitts-
burgh Pirates split their double-
header with the Montreal Expos
yesterday, losing the first gamel
1-0, and winning the second 3-1.1
The split enabled the Bucs to
maintain their two game lead over
the Cubs, who were rained out.
The third place New York Mets
picked up a half game on the
Pirates, by beating the Philadel-
phia Phillies 7-6. The Mets are
now three games behind the Bucs'
pace.
Ink the first game, Bill Stonerhan
tamed Pittsburgh on six hits and
Two thousand tickets are still
available for the Knicks-Pis-
tons exhibition basketball game
tomorrow at Crisler Arena. The
price of the tickets, which can
be purchased at the Ticket Of-
fice at the corner of Hoover
and State streets, is $1 for stu-
dents with ID cards and faculty
and staff with athletic cards,
and $2.50 for others.
Harpring

shade
Rusty Staub drove in the only run 1
with a sixth-inning triple.
Dock Ellis, who allowed onlyj
five hits through the seven in-
nings he pitched, was sailing along
on a one-hitter until Stoneman,
batting .091, blooped a single to
right to lead off the sixth.
Ellis, 12-10 got the next two!
batters, but Staub laced a sizzling
triple to center for the deciding
run.
The Pirates loaded the bases
in the fifth on a scratch singlel
by Bill Mazeroski, a walk and a
hit batsman, but Willie StargellE
struck out to end the threat.
Stoneman, 6-15, walked two
batters, hit three and struck out:
six.E
Matty Alou cracked a bases
loaded fifth-inning single and
Richie Hebner followed with al
sacrifice fly, giving the Pittsburghk
Pirates a 3-1 victory in the night-1
cap.-
Left-hander Bob Veale, makingl
his first start in 15 days. due to!
an ailing arm, won his 10th game
in the nightcap with relief help1
from Joe Gibbon.
The Expos scored a run in the
expected

Phils
daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR.
BOB ANDREWS
second inning when Hebner threw
low to first on Coco Laboy's
grounder and Bobby Wine follow-
ed an out later with a run-scoring
double.
The Pirates tied it in the fourth
when starter Mike Wegener walk-
ed Hebner and Al Oliver start the
inning and Bob Robertson hit a
sacrifice fly.
In the fifth, Dave Cash dou-
bled, Gene Alley was hit by a
pitch, and Veale, attempting to
sacrifice, laid down a perfect bunt
along the third base line for a
hit to load the bases.
Alou then dribbled a hit be-
tween short and third for a run
and Hebner drove in another with
a sacrifice fly.
* * *

to start on Saturday

Michigan offensive tackle Jack
Harpring, who sustained a slight
shoulder separation in Saturday's
20-9 win over Arizona, practiced
at full speed yesterday with his
shoulder strapped down and is ex-
pected-to be ready for Saturday's
game a g a i n s t Washington in
Seattle.
But starting defensive tackle
Fred Grambau, who injured his
leg two weeks ago and missed the
Arizona ga e, still is not in top
condition nd will not make the
trip west with the team on Friday.
Defensive halfback Bruce Elliott,
who sustained a shoulder injury
in the Wolverines' final pre-sea-
son scrimmage, is not listed on
the team's traveling roster of 48
players, either. Elliot is also ex-
pected to miss the game against
Texas A&M Oct. 3.
Coach Bo Schembechler, who
said he was disappointed with the
Wolverines' offense after their
opening game, said the team had
a "goxod offensive workout" yes.-
terday.
Schembechler also said the Wol-4
Major League
Standings
AMERICANsLEAGUE
East

verines will wear different shoes
if the field at Washington is wet
this weekend. He said he noticed
in the Michigan State-Washington
films that the Spartans, who wear
the same shoes as the Wolverines,
were slipping on the wet field,
while the Huskies were not. Wash-
ington beat MSU, 42-16.
The reason for the slipping on
the field, Schembechler said, is
that the Astro-Turf in the Hus-
kies' Stadium is falling apart out-
side the hash marks, and that
when the field is wet, the large-
cleat shoes have nothing to dig
into and thus have no traction.
Blacks rej oin
SPracuse 11
SYRACUSE, N.Y. OP)~ - Eight
black athletes suspended from the
Syracuse University football squad
will be reinstated immediately on
the recommendation of head
Coach Floyd Ben Schwartzwalder,
it was announced late yesterday.
The announcement came from
the university's sports information
office which quoted Chancellor
John E. Corbally Jr. as saying he
h a d accepted Schwartzwalder's
recommendation.
A university spokesman said
Schwartzwalder took the action
after a squad vote late yesterday.
The athletes were suspended
from the squad after boycotting
practices early in spring training.-
Earlier in the day, university
officials and five of the eight
athletes met with the state com-
missioner of human rights in an
effort to resolve the players'
grievances.
GRAD COFFEE
HOUR
THURSDAY
4-6
4th floor Rackhom

1
j
,
i
1
t
j
t
I
Y
k
Y

ilets squeeze by
PHILADELPHIA - T o m m i e
Agee trickled a two-run single
through Philadelphia's draw-in in-
field in the ninth inning Tuesday
night, sending the New York Mets
past the Phillies 7-6 and back into
the thick of the National League's
East championship struggle.
Ken Boswell opened the ninth
against ex-Met Dick Selma with
a single and took second on Ed
Kranepool's pinch single. Bud
Harrelson walked, filing the bases
with none out. One out later
Agee's soft b o u n c e r slipped
through the right side of t]4e in-
field, delivering the tying and win-
ning runs.
New York scored five runs in
the rhubarb-marred sixth, during
which Phils starting pitcher Jim
Bunning and Manager Frank
Lucchesi were ejected from the
game. But the home club, which!
had won four straight, bounced
back against Met reliever Danny
Frisella'in the eighth.
The veteran right-hander tossed:
his glove in the air and was

1
l
I

thumbed by plate umpire Stan
Landes.
Oscar Gamble beat out an in-
field hit, Larry Hisle walked and
pinch-hitter Willie Montane sin-
gled to fill the bases.'
Tony Taylor then lashed a tri-
ple to right center, tying the
game, and he scored the go-ahead
run on Ron Stone's sacrifice fly.
T V RENTLS
$10.50 per month
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-Associated Press
BILL STONEMAN, MONTREAL PITCHER, safely slides into third base after outfielder Boots Day's
single. The action occurred in the third inning of yesterday's opener between the Pirates and Ex-
pos. Stoneman blanked the Bucs on six hits, 1-0 in the first game, but Pittsburgh salvaged the night-
cap by a 3-1 score, to remain two/games ahead of the Cubs and three ahead of the Mets, who nipped
the Phils, 7=6'.

onl
Publ'i6sh a Newspaper
* We meet new people-'
" We laugh a lot'
" We find consolation

o We play football
a We make money

(once)
(some)

ATTENTION
STUDENTS:

Baltimore
New York
Boston
Detroit
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota
Oakland
California
Kansas City
Milwaukee
Chicago,

w
100
886
82
76
74
70 8
West
92
85 6
81 7
61
60
54 9

L
54
67
73
78
81
83

Pct.
.649
.568
.529
.494
.477
.458

GB
12%
18%
24
26%
29%
I114
31
371:

61 .601
69 .552
73 .526
92 .399
94 .390
98 .355

THE EMERSON Speed Reading course is
coming to Ann Arbor! Find out how you
can read 3-10 times faster in just eight
weeks. And for as much as $80 less than
comparable courses.
Plan to attend a free Speed Reading
demonstration on campus:
BELL TOWER HOTEL
300 South Thayer
Room 212
Stop in anytime between 4 and 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 23 or Thursday, Sept.
24 for free information.
Or call collect: ( 313) 352-3537
Emerson Reading Institute
24123 Greenfield Rd.
Southfield, Michigan 48075

i

I

We solve problems
We gain prestige
" We become self confident
" We debate vital issues
" We drink 5c Cokes
" We have T.G. s
JOIN the DAILY staff
}
Come by 420_ Maynard St,
between 1 P.M. and 4 P.M.,. Monday thru Friday
and ask for MARK or VI DA

Yesterday's Results
Boston 8, Cleveland 2
Baltimore 10, Detroit 2
New York 2, Washington I
Milwaukee 4, California 2
Kansas City 2, Chicago 1, 1st
Kansas City at Chicago, inc., 2nd
Minnesota at Oakland, inc.
Today's Games
Minnesota at Oakland, night
California at Milwaukee, night.
Kansas City at Chicago
Detroit at Baltimore, night
Washington at New York, night
Cleveland at Boston

0

TODAY ONLY
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

NATIONAL LEAGUE

,

Pittsburgh.
Chicago
New York
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal

East
83
80
80
72
70
West

L
71
82
74
81
84
86

Pct.
.539
.526
.519
.471
.455
.442

GB
2
.3
13
15

COME AS YOU ARE
.
x'. fa

Cincinnati 98 58 .628
Los Angeles 83 70 .542 13
San Francisco 83 70 .542 13',%>
Atlanta 75 80 .484 22y
Houston 72,82 .468 25
San Diego 59 95 .383 38
Yesterday's Results
Chicago at St. Louis, ppd.
Montreal 1, Pittsburgh 0, 1st
Pittsburgh 3, Montreal 1, 2nd
New York 7, Philadelphia 6
Cincinnati 6, Houston 5
Atlanta 3, San Diego 2
San Francisco at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
New York at Philadelphia, night
Montreal at Pittsburgh, night
Chicago at St. Louis, twi-night
San Diego at Atlanta, night
Houston at Cincinnati, night
San Francisco at Los Angeles, night

-i

Perhaps in between the ch
zie Russell, who deserves them
dividual moment of silence for]
player and a great person, too.
Wilhelm a Cub
ATLANTA (R) - The ;hicago
Cubs puchased veteran knuckle-
ball pitcher Hoyt Wilhelm from
*he Atlanta Braves on waivers
yesterday.
Wilhelm, 47, who has played in!
the major leagues for 19 seasons,
had the top earned run e verage
on the Braves pitching staff this
season at 3.11.'
4 He had a 6-4 record with the
Braves and 13 saves in 78 1-3 in-
nings.
Wilhelm became the first pitch-

eers tomorrow night for Caz-
, we could all observe an in-
Bill Buntin, who was a great

r

UNI ,N BILLIARD ROOM
it

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Billiards $1/hour
Table Tennis 50c
9 A.M.-Noon Mon.-Sat.
1 P.M.- 6 P.M. Sunday

Free Instructions
this Saturday
10OA.M.-Noon

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Ann Arbor
Ring Day
September lat FOLLETT'S

MEN'S RING, IOK YELLOW GOLD
Economy, Open Back 139.50.
Standard, Plastic-Closed 44.50
Deluxe, Gold-Closed 50.50
WOMEN'S MINIATURE RING,
1 OK YELLOW GOLD
Economy, Open Back 30.00
Deluxe, Gold-Closed 32,00
WOMEN'S DINNER RING, 1 OK YELLOW GOLD
Economy, Open Back 33.00
Deluxe, Gold-Closed 35.061
Rings set in your choice of Twelve
Birthstones or Black Onyx
Optional Features:
Far White Gold 5.00
Stone Encrusting
One English or Block letter

Billiard Clinic
7:30-9 P.M. Sept. 30

and WEAR WHAT IYOU WANT
for your

-NEII& -10 Adrlbh,"MAM -&4 -30"Im -MMAM Agr-

Two Greek Letters 4
Three Greek Letters 6

4.00
6.00

I - -

11

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