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September 22, 1970 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-22

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, Seorember 22, 1970

"ae ixTH.MCHGA.DL

,, ,- - , --

I -

RALLY TODAY:
Tent people disobey
'U orders to vacate,

U.S. marshalls military force
for potential use in Mideast

(Continued from Page 1)
The county Board of Health
first raised the health question on
Sept. 9, when Dr. Otto Engelke,
director of the county health de-
partment, and several members of
the county health board visited
the campsite.
The product of their investiga-
tion was a letter from Engelka to:
James Brinkerhoff, director of
University business operations, in
which Engelke charged that t h e
campers said they "used the bush-
es" when no toilet facilities were'
available. He said numerous health
laws were being violated and a
"health hazard" was being creat-
ed by the presence of the tents.
"If the University is to continue
the operation of these camping
facilities, a suitable service build-
ing with the required toilet and
shower facilities must be pro-.
vided, he said.
Engelke also cited State Public
Act 171, the so-called "G o o s e
Lake" law, which requires the lic-
ensing of campsites after January
1, as being applicable.:
Knauss yesterday said provid-
ing the required facilities by
openin'g ,a neighboring Univer-
sity building, such as Waterman
Gym as was suggested by campers,
is "not possible" because of "se-
curity problems."
Last Friday, when it was dis-
covered that a person who had
spent two days at Tent City had
hepatitis, doubts among health
personnel increased.
"I certainly had doubts about
the health safety of the campsite
before the hepatitis case - I
had seen a potential hazard -
but the hepatitus confirmed my
analysis and Engelke's," s a i d
University Director of Environ-
mental Health William Joy yester-
day. "So, on Friday I recommend-
ed to Brinkerhoff the tents be re-
moved," he said.
The hepatitis victim had .stay-
ed for two days at Tent City and
several days elsewhere.
Brinkerhoff ordered the r e -
moval of, the tents by 11 a.m.
Saturday, but Knauss had "given
a commitment" that no decision
would be made until a scheduled
meeting with camp representa-
tives yesterday morning. After a
series of communications between
Knauss and Joy, the order w a s
delayed until a Sunday night
meeting with the campers.
"It was just a case of a break-
down in communications between
Knauss and myself," Joy said.
Knauss and Joy reiterated their,
position Sunday, emphasizing that
the problem was "primarily a
health question," and that at 1
p.m. yesterday plant officials
would come for those who desired
to move their tents= to the North
Campus site. However, as yester-
day's deadline approached, t h e
campers' increased their charges
that "politics" was the issue and
Knauss conceded that there were
"political overtbnes" involved.

A- "guerrilla theater" skit w a s
presented before yesterday's dead-
line.
After, the campers' refused to
move, both sides in the argument
met separately to discuss the situ-
ation.. Several faculty members,
Including University C ou n c I
chairman Theodore St. Antoine,
met with Knauss and President
Fleming yesterday afternoon.
"Although it was mainly a back-
ground session. it was expressed
that the University feels some type
of action is necessary," St. Antoine
said.
It was also considered likely
that the county would take action
if the University didn't, he added.
Many different moves the Univer-
sity could take were discussed, in-
cluding injunctions, but no deci-
sion was arrived at, St. Antoine
said.
Knauss has also stated several
times that he felt the county
would take some sort of action if
the University didn't.
Fleming also met last night with
members from University Council,
SACUA and Student Government
Council. Dr. Raymond Kahn, a
member of the University Council,
and Dr. D. L. H i n e r m a n, of
SACUA, issued a statement last
night warning the community of
the seriousness of hepatitis, saying
they believed that there is a severe
health problem at tent city."
However, Jerry De Grieck, exe-
cutive vice president of SGC said
that if Waterman Gym's facilities
were made available then he be-
lieved that a health hazard, if any
exists, could be alleviated.
"As far as we're concerned, the
next move is up to the Univer-
sity," said Dr. Joseph Price, coun-
ty director of environmental
health. "We've had some hepa-
titis over there as far as we're,
concerned, we can't have a situa-
tion like this in a congested urban
area."
Some doctors have said that as
long as lavatories are used and
the area kept clean, and serum
taken by those in prolonged con-
tact with the hepatitis victim,
there was no "health reason" for
removing the tent.
Joy agrees that the area is
"fairly clean," but says that the
area is still "potentially hazard-
ous." University Health Service
Director Robert Anderson has
agreed with Joy's appraisal and
has called for the tents' removal.
In addition, other issues have
been raised besides those of poli-
tics and health. "There is the
question also of to what extent:
the University is willing to have
its facilities used by non-students,"
Knauss said y e st e r d a y. Alsq
Knauss admitted that county offi-
cials are opposed to the No r t h
Campus alternative that he sug-
gested.
Meanwhile, more tents appear-"
ed on the Diag last night, follow-
ing an appeal by the campers for
students to camp out with them.

(Continued from Page 1)
Jordan, and said there has been
some tentative discussion with the
Jordanian government about air-
ports that might be used be nec-
essary.
But he said there has been no
recommendation from the U.S.
embassy in Aman for evacuation
of Americans. This apparently
means that U.S. embassy officials
feel there isn't immediate danger.
McCloskey said that if U.S.
military forces are sent in to re-
move American citizens from Jor-1
dan it is hoped that the evacu-
ation will be peaceful.
McCloskey said the United
States has decided to send two
nilitary field hospitals to Jordan
and is discussing arrangements
with the International Red Cross
for getting them into the war-torn
country.
He said Jordan had appealed
for the field hospitals.
Officials said they probably
would be manned by American
military personnel - principally
doctors and nurses - because only
people trained in their use know
how to set them up.
The Pentagon said that "We are
continuing to take a series of ad-
ditional precautionary actions to
increase the readiness of Army,
Navy, Marine and Air Force units
to support an evacuation opera-
tion for Americans in Jordan
should that be necessary. These
increased readiness actions involve
units both here and in Germany,
including some medical and hos-
pital units and additional ships
and transport aircraft."
The home paratroop unit is the
Prof. William D. Revelli, di-
rector of University bands, was
recently honored by a resolution
taken by the American Legion, at
their Department Convention in
Grand Rapids.
The resolution stated: "The'
American Legion does hereby give
to Dr. William D. Revelli due and
proper recognition for his many
efforts to instill civic responsibil-
ity, pride in America and its in-
stitutions and international un-
derstanding through the language
of music."
It praised Revelli for his "lead-
ership, vision, ideals, imagination,
inspiration and standards of ex-
cellence, through the international
language of music in which he has
presented a unique concept of
American ideals by his tours to
other nations of the world."
The place to meet
INTERESTING people
BACH CLUB
presents
RANDOLPH SMITH
Boch Club president and found-
er speaking on:
"WHAT THE
HELL* IS
DEVELOPMENT
IN BACH?
Plus o short election of officers
including a new president.
Refreshments and FUN afterwardsI
EVERYONE INVITED!
THURS., SEPT. 24, 8 P.M.
S.Q. WEST LOUNGE
No musical knowledge needed,
for further info. cell 663-2827,
769-2003, 663-6919

82nd Airborne Division at Ft.
Bragg, N.C. As part of the U.S.
strike command force, the division
would rely on huge C141 jet trans-
ports for its own transportation.
:eaves for the troops were can-
celed and the 82rid's parents U.S.
strike command canceled Exercise
Brass Strike 7 because of the divi-
sion being placed on alert.
In Europe there are two bat-
talions, about 1,500 man, of para-
troopers attached to the 8th Divi-
sion in West Germany. Also on
alert and available for C130 flights
to the battle area are infantry
units of the 1st and 24th divisions.
The Navy carriers Saratoga and
Independence together with some
35 supporting ships are already in
range of Jordan. The John F.
Kennedy's airpower would give

the United States some 250
fighter bombers all told from
Navy force.

jet
Its

A Marine landing team of 1,500
men is already with this force.
Another force of 'the same size
plus the helicopter carrier Guam
is en route to the Mediterranean.
Pentagon spokesmen would not
go beyond a possible evacuation
mission as a reason for the U.S.
buildup. They called the Mideast
situation fluid and complex.
In a limited evacuation situ-
ation the likely deployment of U.S.
troops would be the airfield and
city of Amman provided it could
be secured by friendly government
troops. In this situation the C130s
would probably bring the Army
troops in for their role in cover-
ing the situation.

UNION BOWLING

400
9 A.M.-Noon
Monday-Saturday

LEAGUES FORMING
Tues. and Wed. nights
SIGN UP NOW!

The QUEN of HEART
(-and the King)
Have Already Purchased Their Season Tickets-H AVE YOU?
5p
UNIVERSITY",
PLAYERS present
PLAYBILL '70-'71,1
THE CAUCASIAN CHALK CIRCLE
bertolt brecht
October 7-10-Trueblood Theatre
A MODERN ODYSSEY a play from the BLACK THEATRE
kazantzakis to be announced
November 4-7-Trueblood December 2-5-Lydia Mendelssohn
TIMON OF ATHENS
shakespeare
January 27-30-Trueblood
THE DEVILS THE REFUSAL
whiting a premiere!
February 17-20-Trueblood March 17-20--Trueblood
THE GIRL FROM MAXIM'S
georges feydeau
April 7-10-Mendelssohn
SEASON TICKETS: '80 110, 14
TICKET INFORMATION:
The Box Office will open for Season Subscription sales from Sept. 28 to Oct. 10.
Thereafter it will be open weeks of performance only, Monday and Tuesday,
12:30-5:00; Wednesday thru Saturday, 12:30-8:00. Mail orders will be filled
prior to the opening of the Box Office.
PRICES: (SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS OFFER SAVINGS AND PREFERRED
LOCATIONS)
Season Subscription: REGULAR: (Wed. and Thurs,)-$8.00, $11.00
WEEKEND (Fri. and Sat.)-$1 1.00, $14.00
MIXED: (weekdays and weekends mixed)-add
50c for each Friday or Saturday ticket
ordered to regular season price above
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: WED. and THURS.-$2.00, $1.50
FRI. and SAT.-$2.50, $2.00

NOTE: The higher priced tickets are the first 17 rows of orchestra and first 4 rows
of balcony.
ALL PERFORMANCES AT 8:00 P.M. SHARP! LATECOMERS WILL BE SEATED AT THE CONVENIENCE
OF THE AUDIENCE. NO REFUNDS. EXCHANGES,'WHEN POSSIBLE, UNTIL 4:00 P.M. DAY OF PER-
FORMANCE.
MENDELSSOHN BOX OFFICE: 668-6300 TRUEBLOOD BOX OFFICE: 764-5387
mmmmm...= mm.mmmm.== Mmm..nmm==mm==mmmi=n==mmmm=mmin mm====== ==mu mm mm rmm
ORDER BLANK SEASON SUBSCRIPTION
Weekend E
NAME Regular f
MIXED E
Please ADDRESS_
Print INDIVIDUAL TICKETS
CITYSTATE.
Prefer Orchestra E
PHONEZIPBalcony E
Are you on our mailing list? Faculty E Student E Ann Arbor [- El Visitor
WED. Thur. Fri. 'Sat. No, Price Office Use
CIRCLE
ODYSSEY - ~
BLACK
TIMON
DEVILS
PREMIERE________________
MAXIM'S
TOTAL (Season Price or Individual Tickets)________- for mixed season add 50c for each

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN'
(Continued from Page 2)
23, 7:30 p.m., in Jordan Lounge. Inter-
ested persons are invited to participate
in the debate personally, by petition,
or by some other means:
SGC procedures for forming n e w
governments.
Criteria for democratically constitut-
ed student organizations.
WHEREAS: The Personnel Director
and the Student Organizations Director
and his assistaent are expected to put a
large amount of time and effort into
SGC affairs;
WEREAS: In the past their renum-
eration has been inconsistent with the
amount of work involved;
MOVE: That SGC pay the Personnel
Director and Student Organizations
Director and his assistant $40 each per
term.
WHEREAS: Ozone House has request-
ed an allocation of $500 from SGC
to help support its activities; and
WHEREAS: SOC's other financial re-
sponsibilities prohibit such an alloca-
tion;
MOVE: That SGC allocate $300 to
Ozone House. (Amendment: That SGC,
allocate $500 to Ozone House). (Amend-
ment: That Dale Oesterle be appointed
liaison to determine further action of
SGC in aiding Ozone House.)
WHEREAS: Student Mobilization
Committee (SMC) has requested an
appropriation of $250 from SGC to help
support its activities, and;
WHEREAS: SGC's other financial re-
sponsibilities prohibit such an alloca-
tion;SC
MOVE: That SGC appropriate $200 to
SMC.
* * * *
WHEREAS: Security in the SAB has
for some time been a question of con-
cern;
WHEREAS: A guard will begin pa-,
trolling the SAB at 5 p.m., Septem-
ber 16, 1970;
WHEREAS: Victor Gutman and Rick

Perlman have recently established
guidelines for this grad's activities and
other SAE security measures;
MOVE: Adoption of these procedures.
* *e*+r
Resolution requesting Student Gov-
ernment support of the ad hoc Stu-
dent Group on Committee Effective-
ness as enumerated in the Action Plan
for increasing Student Influences in
Decision Making at the University of
Michigan.
MOVE: That SGC allocate $500 to
the B.A.M. Martin Luther King Fund
to be deposited in the First Inde-
pendent National Bank of Detroit in-
stead of the Martin Luther King Fund
under Vice President Allan Smith.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
UM Judo Club' meeting, Wednesday,
Sepj. 23rd at 7:15 p.m. in the IM
Wrestling Room.
All are welcome to Baratin Coffee
Hour, every Thursday begining Sept.
24, 3-5, Frieze Bldg., Room 3050. Open
invitation to people interested in
French language and culture.
Attention: Student Organizations!
The Student Government Council Reg-
ulations Concerning Student Organiza-
tions stipulates that an organization
must register their organization with-
in the first three weeks of the term
to maintain recognition status. You
can register your organization in 1011
Student Activities Building by Sept.
25, 1970. Phone: 764-7416.
Zero Population Growth: Ann Arbor
will have a meeting on Wed., Sept. 23
at 7:30 p.m. In the Social Hall of the
Unitarian Church (1917 Washtenaw
Av.) Dr. Wood from the Assn. for Vol-
untary Sterilization will speak and ac-
tion projects will be further planned.]
* * * *
Angel Flight Mass Meeting, Sept. 22,
7:30 p.m., UGLI Multipurpose Room.

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