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September 20, 1970 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-20

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r
page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September ',20, 1970

1Dage Six THE MiCHIGAN DAILY Sunday, September 20, 1970

Four area
peace
co-existing'
(Continued from Page 1)
Dow, GM, and other war-related in-'
dustries." t
None of the Peace Center groups
have yet endorsed Student Mobiliza-}
tion Committee's plans f o r nation-
wide demonstrations on October 31.
Peace Works organizer Ann Oliver says
she regards demonstrations as "bad
tactics now." Harris says, "Broad
changes are needed both in and out
of the system, especially when some
things are not communicated well in
it." Mrs. Fuller says she is "not fight-
ing it, just not turned on by the idea."
Both the Council and the Commit-
tee see a coalition government in
Vietnam supervised by a neutral par-
ty as a possible solution of the war.
None of the organizations declares
itself against all wars simply because
of their opposition to this one. Ruck-
nagle says, "Pacifism is a relative po-
sition. Everyone has a point at which
he becomes violent. The purpose of the
war also influences attitudes. Some
legislators who are doves about Viet-
nam are very hawkish about the Arab-
Israeli conflict."
WHO SUPERVISES?

Disorder
in La. town
THIBOXAUX, La. (AP')-- A
state of civil emergency was pro-
claimed and a 9 p.m. curfew was
imposed by the mayor of this
southeast Louisiana community
Saturday following fights between
blacks and whites that spurred
further violence.
"This means that everyone has
to be off the streets by 9 p.m.
or they will be arrested," declared
Mayor Warren J. Harang Jr.
The curfew was to remain in
effect until 5 a.m. and during the
curfew hours all retail liquor
stores or any place licensed to sell
liquor or beer was ordered clos-
ed.
Nine persons were injured, none
seriously in a series of disturb-
ances that involved at one time or
another more than 100 persons.
Trouble began, Harang said, with
an argument among several per-
sons after a high school football
game.
The trouble peaked when roam-
ing groups of blacks moved
through a racially mixed neigh-
borhood smashing car windows
with homemade clubs and throw-
ing rocks and bottles at police.
Volunteer fireman battling the
blaze were threatened and har-
assed.
The mayor called in the La-
fourche Parish sheriff's office,
state police and deputies from
St. Mary and Terrebonne parishes
to keep order.

4

A

-Associated Press
Flower children,
Mississippi Governor John Bell Williams and a member of his staff admire a flower-be-
decked sign bidding them welcome to the thir ty-sixth Southern Governors Conference. The
two day conference, scheduled to begin tomorrow, will focus on solving state problems.

II

Bookstore employes
in rift with manager

U of M Students for HART
need your help for
REGISTRATION DRIVE
This is the political work that gets votes!
nna A "rUC C 'AR I tRRV

CINEMA

II

1

(Continued from Page 1)
Bill Price, another s t u d e n t
Board member, commented on the
change in atmosphere that has
accompanied the store's growth.
"He described the present store as
a "general store in the traditional
mode" in contrast *to the former
IHA,.H
C IRA1 1u Z V
plan LQo alter~
aconstitution
(Continued from Page 1)
now. In the RHU constitution, a
president would be elected direct-
ly by the residents in the dorms.
He would sit on the Board of Gov-
ernors in contrast to IRA's pro-
posal that the chairman not be a
member of the Board of Gov-
ernors.
Another difference separating
the two sides is how the constitu-
encies of the representatives would
appear. Both sides have districted
their representative body accord-
ing to population, but in very dif-
ferent manners.
The manner in which the pro-i
posed constitution would be sub-
mitted for' approval is also an is-
sue. Hartzler indicated that he
would submit the new constitution
to the various different house
councils and dorm councils for
their approval. "This method of
aproval meets the requirements of
SGC according to their rules,"'
said, Hartzier.+
RHU would like to see a general
student ratification of the con-
stitution rather than on a house
council basis, according to Lewin.
Both sides would like to avoid1
the necessity of submitting two
constitutions to be approved. "It
has been a long fight. There is
important business to be taken
care of - i.e. appointment of stu-
dent members to the Board of
Governors," says Lewin. Hartzler
says, RI am hopeful we can agree.
I think we can because we are
extremely close on many points."
Blacks print
magazine
(Continued from Page 1)
torial message in the first edition:
of Burning Spear.
The magazine staff is seeking'
funds through the Martin Luther
King Scholarship Fund. The fund:
has offered $4,800 for the year
"conditional to approval of the
Board of Student Publications,"
Douglas said.
It is currently unclear w h e n
that money will be forthcoming
pending a letter from the board
to Vice President for Academic
Affairs, Allan Smith.
Though the first edition of the
magazine, which sells for $.25, was
run off on an electromineograph
machine, the staff plans to have
f u t u r e editions professionally
printed.
-Currently, the staff. is looking;
for 'an office off-campus because
"'theydon't want the stigma of a
camnus organization." Douglas

COMETOtHESAB LVOB
"happening" which filled the Either FRIDAY, SEPT. 25 at 7:00 P.M.
functions of a store." or SATURDAY, SEPT. 26 at 11:00 A.M.
As the meeting concluded, it Call 761-8825 for more info
was decided that the student em-
ployes should frequent the Board _ --- -
meetings, which are open to the Ima<== > a c ot o o .=>0mo
general public as well.
Professor Crawford summed up
the Board's opinions:, He noted
that the store has changed dras-
tically, from a work of spirit to
an actual business. He warned
the students that "You just can't.00
use other people's money" and j Zen, Y bogTarot
that the business had to be runZe:Y g.Tao
as a corporation, for which the Alchem Astrolog, Theosophy
Board has ultimate responsibility.
"Mr. Hall is the manager of ~ ,i~ aah~coo'
the tore ani1sul"timately eson- Tarot, Magic",Parapsychologyv
sible for it. but at the same time
we expect him to make use of all
inputs available to him," s a i d Macrobiotics and Health Food Books
,Board President Gary Allen.
Allen explained that the Board
has the ultimate responsibility 215 S. STATE .,. . 2nd Floor
for all decisions and that itT striv-.
es for information from all see-- 10 A.M.-8:30 P.M. 769-1583 A
tors of the University. "Em-
ployes are a big factor, but only , o-I--><--c <- >t <-><->0- >><
one. There are other inputs," he -
continued.--
Crawford said he recognized
that the students have worked
hard for the store and that more is D * * assi ieus
pleaded for tolerance of Mr. Hall,
explaining that growing pains are
natural, that there is recourse in Phone 764-0558
case of misunderstanding. "We -
shouldn't let differences of opin-
ion ruin this whole operation."
NOW HERE IN ANN ARBOR
Our New Associate Store To Serve You!
W'eDon't Say Our Receivers Are The Greatest...
TheCrtics Do!

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1

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S4 9:00 p.m. -SMILES OF A SUMMER NIGHT-Bergman
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Fri.

Sept. 25

1:00 p.m.-THE INFORMER-Dir. John Ford
VICTOR McLAGLEW in a drama
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9:00 p m.*-THE MAGNIFICIENT AMBERSONS-Dir. Orson Welles
JOSEPH COTTON
11:00 p.m.-THE MAGNIFICIENT AMBERSONS

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Sept. 26 9:00 p.m.*-THE LADY VANISHES-Dir. Alfred Hitchcock
11:00 p.m.-THE LADY VANISHES

Sun.
Sep.2

7:00 pm.-BLACK ORPHEUS
11:00 p.m.-BLACK ORPHEUS
*PLEASE NOTE TIME CHANGES-tickets go on sale for each
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will be charged for each performance.

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