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September 19, 1970 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-19

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday; 5epterriber 1 9x 1970

~cge Six THE MICHiGAN DAILY Saturday, September 19, 1970

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MR. BEEF 'IN A BASKET.......$1.19
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MR. HAM & CHEESE'.............. 89c
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CHICKEN IN A BASKET ....... ..$1.39
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CHICKEN IN A BASKET .......... $1.89
SHRIMP IN A BASKET........$1.69
(6 Large Gulf Shrimp, Tangy Sauce,
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SIDE ORDERS

By JOHN PAPANEK
Now, that another endless sum-
mer has passed us by, and an in-
terminable spring, not to men-
tion that long winter, fall returns
again to our nation's college cam-
puses. No greater evidence of that
fact can be seen than today when
a full slate of NCAA football
games grace the nation's grid-
irons.
Today is the day that all the Big
Ten teams kickoff their non-con-
ference schedules. Well - alm'ost
all the teams.
Poor Woody Hayes and his Ohio
State Buckeyes have no one to
play with this Veekend. It's a
typical predicament for the big
bully on the block. So while
Woody and his boys are watching
television or playing cards, their
arch-nemesis, the Michigan Wol-
verines along with the rest of the
Big Ten will be knocking heads in
front of hundreds of thousands
of blood-thirsty fans.
IF MICHIGAN and OSU dom-
inate the conference as most ex-
perts expect them to, then the
battle forthird should be between
Purdue and Minnesota.
Imagine the plight of Purdue's
rookie coach Bob DeMoss. After
being an assistant coach for
twenty years and supplying t h e
teams with such great quarter-
backs as Len Dawson, Bob Griese

-Daily-Sara Krulwich
Purdue line tries to break Michigan defense

DAVID VS. GOLIATH:

and Mike Phipps, DeMoss must
now start his first season with an
untested, unknown sophomore in
today's opener against Texas
Christian.
Chuck Piebes, a 6-2, 190-pound-
er'from Valhalla, N.Y., fits in with
Purdue's usual quarterback three-
year plan. Purdue has had the
luck in the' past to come up with
great sophomore quarterbacks who
go on to play for three years. If
the Boilermakers do manage ' to
come up with another quarter-
backing phenom, their offense will
be a powerful one to reckon with.
PURDUE has two of the' most
dangerous receivers anywhere in
speedsters Ashley Bell and Stan
Brown,' Bell, a 6-4 junior, s e t
school and Big Ten records 1 a it
year for touchdown catches, and
Brown turned 32 receptions into
the third highest yardage in Pur-
due history. He also led the na-
tion in kick-off returns and plac-
ed fifth in scoring.
While TCU was drubbing Texas
at Arlington last week, 3 1-7, De-
Moss was worried about his team.
"Our task of preparing for a team
that- already passed the openingi
game jitters is all the more diffi-
cult this week. We have injuries
limiting us to one running back
who has carried the ball in a
varsity game."
The man he referred to is Scott
Clayton, a 195-pound Junior half-
back. John Bullock; last year's
210-pound fullback is nursing an
ankle injury and may not play.
DeMoss' problems could be some-
what alleviated, however, if Soph-
omore Otis Armstrong {(5-11, 190)
lives up to his potential.
COPING WITH the TCU-ground
game that exploded for 436 yards
last week falls on a veteran corps
of Purdue defenders led by tacky
les Alex Davis and Ron Maree,
and linebackers Veno Paraskevas
and Jim Teal.
Despite taking the Big Ten's
largest collection of lettermen in-
to the 1970 season, Minnesota
coach Murray Warmath senses
trouble in a schedule that begins
against.nationally ranked Missouri
and includes encounters with Ne-
braska and Ohio State and Mich-
igan in successive weekends.
Warmath discounts his assembly
of 36 lettermen because "m a n y
of them just made the grade in
terms of minutes played." But the
fact remains that the Gopher's
talent supply includes nine letter-
men who started last year on de-
fense and six on offense. Minne-
sota will try to shake its reputa-
tion of being a slow starter. Last
year the Gophers did not win un-
til their seventh game and then
never lost to finish a s t r b n g
fourth in the Big Ten.
WARMATH'S main concern has
been to find a successor for
graduated quarterback Phil Hag-
en. His choice is Craig Curry, a
6-1, 190-pounder from M i a m i,

Can the meek inherit grid glory?

By RANDY PHILLIPS
Four of last year's easy touches
will be trying to destroy that image
and bring home some of that grid-
iron glory today when they tangle
with some of the nation's estab-
lished powers.
Georgia Tech coach Bud Carson
may well be on his way to his
first winning season since taking
over the reins three years ago. The
Yellowjackets, coming off a 23-20
conquering of 17th ranked'South
Carolina, face the pass happy
Florida State Seminoles in a battle
that should decide who is the top
independent in the south.
TECH'S FORTUNES lay in the
arm of sophomore quarterback Ed-
die McAshan, the first black quar-
terback at a major southern
school. McAshan will vary the of-
fense between his passes to split
end Wes Sherrill and tight end
Steve Foster, and handoffs to

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running backs Brent Cunningham
and Rob Healy.
The big question mark today
will be whether the Tech offensive
line can open some holes against
the quick FSU defense.
Explosive is how one would have
to describetthe Seminole offense.
Florida State has been known to
throw three times as often as and
with great success. But this year it
will be hard to keep the ball away
from Tom Bailey, an excellent
runner who gained 630 yards last
season.
Still the Seminoles will come
out throwing as their three top
receivers from last year return
to latch on to spirals thrown by
quarterback Tommy Warren. War-
ren is a good runner as well as an
accurate passer, so the option
threat will be evident when the
Yellowjackets' defense takes the
field.
GEORGIA TECH'S defense will
be tough against the rush with
standout "Rock" Perdoni at tackle
and four solid linebackers.
Over in the southwest another
battle of independents will take
place. The Houston Cougars will
host a rejuvenated Syracuse squad
that is looking to improve on last
year's 5-5 record.
The Orangemen have a habit of
coming up with outstanding run-
ners year after year, but last sea-
son proved to be sub-par even in
that category. Two sophs are
fighting it out for the job this
year, and either of them - John
Page or John Rosella - appear
to be capable of giving Syracuse
a potent ground attack, if the line
holds up.
INEXPERIENCE WILL plague
the Syracuse attack, since six of
last year's starters on the line are
gone. But three key men return,
to provide a good offensive nu-
cleus. Paul Paolisso will resume the
quarterbacking duties after mis-
sing last season with a shoulder
separation. All - East end Tony
Gabriel will provide the target for
Paolisso's passes, and fullback
Marty Januskiewicz -will bulldoze
his way through the line in Larry
Csonka style.
Linebacking is the sore spot of
the Syracuse defense, and Hous-
ton's varied option attack will

highlight this weakness. At de-,
fensive tackle Joe Ehrmann, an
All-American candiate, s h o ul d
force the Cougars to take the out-
side route a little more often.
HOUSTON HAS all the equip-
ment to make it into the top ten
this year. Fifteen starters return
from last year's 12th ranked team
which decimated Auburn 36-7 in
the AstroBluebonnet Bowl.
Offesively, most of the Cougars
who led the no. 2 attack in the
country will be back. This in-
cludes runners Ted Heiskell and
Robert Newhouse, and end Elmo
Wright. Wright has caught 105
passes over two years including
24 touchdowns.
The biggest problem that Hous-
ton coach Bill Yeoman will have
today is his interior offensive line
and quarterback. The two guards
and center will be replaced by
three hefty reserves - all weigh-
ing over 220.
QUARTERBACK Gary Mullins,
who led Houston to their 9-1
record in 1969, will miss half of
the season due to an injured knee.
One of three sophomores should
get a shot at the Syracuse de-
fense.
The Cougar's defensive unit has
been playing in the shadow of
the offense's scoring machine, but
this unit only allowed 94 yards
rushing per game lastnyearand
picked off 26 passes. Only three
starters from last year graduat-
ed, and the entire secondary re-
turns intact.
Syracuse will have a rough
time moving the ball against the
Cougars, and if the Houston quar-
terbacks can generate a passing
'attack, it may be a long day for
the Orangemen.
PENN STATE has been the
team of the east for several years
now, but the men from N a v y
will be trying to challenge the Nit-
tany Lion's supremacy with a
group of outstanding sophomores
and a proven quarterback. Navy
finished 1-9 last season.
Mike McNallen has amassed
2654 yards passing in two years
to threaten Roger Staubach's and
John Cartwright's t h r o w i n g
marks, but this year he should
have a little bit of help from
soph Bob Eflein who led t h e

Plebes in scoring and a stronger
defense.
Only two startsrs are missing'
from the defensive unit that is
somewhat lacking in size. But
tackles Glen Nardi (220) and Mike
O'Shaugnessy (230), up from the
Plebes, should help remedy that
size problem.
Penn State will go into the game
against Navy with many of last
year's stars gone. Especially t h e
defensive unit will be hit hard due
to the graduation of linebacker-
Dennis Onkontz, and tackles Mike
Reid and Steve Smear.
THREE PLAYERS are contest-'
ing for the quarterback job vacat-
ed by Chuck Burkhardt, but sen-
ior Mike Cooper looks to be the
probable starter.
Both the offensive and defen-
sive units of Penn State will be
untested, and Navy will waste no
time in doing the tesbing. Last
week the Midshipmen ripped apart
Colgate 48-22.
Another important contest to-
day should see a vastly improved
Pittsburgh squad take. on tough
UCLA led by quarterback Dennis
Dummit. In an intraconference
game Minnesota takes on the Big
Eight's Missouri as the first full
week of college football gets un-
derway.

Florida. Curry played onlly 52
minutes behind Hagen last year.
No matter how good Minnesota's
offense works today, the Gopher
defense has a tough assignment.
Two strong running backs and two
outstanding wide receivers add up
to a powerful, well-balanced Mis-
souri attack. Tailback Joe Moor,
the nation's third best bail carrier
last year was deastatiig in last
week's Tiger victory over Baylor.
* Another Big Ten clash against
the Big Eight will take place today
in Bloomington, where the In-
diana Hoosiers host the Colorado
Buffaloes. The Buffs, 8-3 last year
with a win in the Liberty Bowl,
have the size and experience to
take a sizable advantage into the
game with Indiana.
THE HOOSIERS are rebuilding
this year after losing their bril-
lian; backfield trio of Harry Gon-
so, John Isenarger and Jade
Butcher. But, says Hoosier coach
John Pont, "We have major re-
building to do, but I feel that we
will have a -good football team in
1970." Pont may certainly be right,
since last year's Indiana freshman
team was considered one of its best
ever. In fact, that team include-
Ted McNulty, Ohio's high school
"Player of the Year,' and Danny
Grossman, who won the sam hon-
or in Indiana. Of the two, Gross-
man will probably get'the starting
assignment in today's game.
WISCONSIN'S BADGERS travel
to Oklahoma to open their sched-
ule. The Sooners got off to a good
start last week as they dealt a
28-11 setback to SM.
Wisconsin's lineup todayr will
find several new faces on offense,
while last year's defense Is basic-
ally still in tact. Rookie coach
John Jardine is'fortunate to have
an experienced quarterback in
Neil Graff, who, as a junior, can
become one of the Big Ten's stand-
outs.
MICHIGAN STATE coach Duffy
Daugherty, whose Spartans open
up today agains Washington, has
been radically shuffling his team
around in order to avoid another
season like last year's 4-6.
"I would hope we are a better
team this fall. We've worked hard
to correct our deficiencies of a
year ago." That work includes
moving last year's quarterback Bill
Triplett to the tailback position
and going with junior Mike Ras-
mussen at quarterback. MSU has
a solid receiving corps in tight
ends Billy Joe DuPree and Dennis
Macholz and split ends Steve
Kough and Herb Washington.
MSU'S DEFENSE, h o w e v e r,
must face the prospect of having
to defend against Washington's
sophomore quarterback Alex "Son-
ny" Sixkiller. Sixkiller has Jim
Creig and bra Hammon as re-
ceivers and Joe Bell and Bo Cor-
nell at running backs.
Northwestern has its hands full
today when it -hosts Notre Dame.
The Wildcats' hopes for an upset
revolve around the quarterbalking.
That applies both on offense-
where junior Maurie Daigneau
must establish an option running
threat to go with his proven pass-
ing ability-and on defense, where
the Wildcats must face Notre
Dame's brilliant Joe Theismann.
NORTHWESTERN'S offense is

4;
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II

11

Major League Standings

tt:. . . ..f$ ^ .. . ? ':::: ;< . , <a....:".% 23:.'...3 . . . .. ..

p ,. rt

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pet.
xBaltimore 97 53, .647
New York 84 67 .556
Boston 77 73 .513
Detroit 76 74 .507
Cleveland 73 78 .484
Washington 70 78 .473
West Division
Minnesota 90 60 .600
Oakland 82 68 .547
California 79 70 .530
Kansas City 58 90 .393
Milwaukee 58 92 .386
Chicago 53 94 .360
x-clinched title,
Yesterday's Results
Milwaukee 4, Kansas City 3
Minnesota 5, Chicago 4
New York 6, Detroit 0
Baltimore 4, Cleveland 3
California at Oakland, inc.
Washington at Boston, ppd.
Today's Games
California at Oakland
Kansas City at Milwaukee
Minnesota at Chicago, night
New York at Detroit
Cieveland at Baltimore, night
Washington at Boston

GB
13Y2
20
21
24Y2
25Y2
7%
10:
31
31
351/

NATIONAL LEAGUE
East Division
W L Pct. GI
Pittsburgh 80 69 .538 -
Chicago 79 71 .524
New York 78 72 .520
St. Louis 72 79 .477
Philadelphia 68 83 .450 1
Montreal 66 84 .444 1
West Division
xCincinnati 95 57 .625
Los. Angeles 80 69 .537 1
San Francisco 80 70 .533 1
Houston 72 77 .483 2
Atlanta 73 79 .480 Z
San Diego 59 93 .391 1
x-clinched division title i
Yesterday's Results
Chicago 3, 5; Montreal 2, 3
Pittsburgh 3, New York 2
Philadelphia 9, St. Louis 7
Cincinnati 11, Atlanta 6
Houston at Los Angeles, Inc.
San Francisco at San Diego, inc.
Today's Games
Chicago at Montreal
Pittsburgh at New York
Philadelphia at St. Louis
Cincinnati at Atlanta
Houston at Los Angeles
San Francisco at San Diego

.1
2
12/2
13%
13
13%
21
21%
35

UNION-LEAGUE

m l.

Flies the 747 to Madrid

well experienced. Their standout
at running back, last year's all.'
Big, Ten fullback Mike . Adamle,
promises to test the Irish defense.
The strongest part of Iowa's
offense is its running game and
coach Ray Nagel looks for it to be
one of the Big Ten's best as his
Hawkeyes open against Oregon
State. Nagel's optimism stems
from the return of fullbacks Tim
Sullivan and Steve Penney, and
tailback Levi Mitchell. The Hawk-
eye backfield averaged 215.5 yards Y
a game last year, and should do
better in 1970.
"The running game is solid,
Nagel said. "The tailbacks are fast,
the fullbacks are strong, and our
line is improved."
SULLIVAN, a 223-pounder sen-
ior, missed last year with a broken
ankle, while Mitchell was sidelined
at mid-season due to a.,kidney ail-
ment.
Oregon State will be depending
on fullback Dave, Schilling,' who
was the 'team's leading, ground'
gainer with 635 yards last year.
Halfback'Ralph Snow and, wing-
back Bill Carlquist should give the
Hawkeye defense plenty to do.

G

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SI 048
SI 050

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