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September 19, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Sat.-Sun., Sept. 19-20
RASHOMON
dir. AKIRA KUROSAWA (1951)
X . The classic film statement of the relativism
-the unknowability-of truth."
-Pauline Kael '
SHORT: Donald Duck in The Mechanic
Sept.'21-WARREN DALE
7 & 9:05 Architecture
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NEWS PHONE: 764=0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, September 19, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

ne-ws briefs
By The Associated Press
PRIME MINISTER Indira Gandhi carried her Congress party
and a leftist coalition to an upset election victory in southern
Kerala State yesterday.
Mrs. Gandhi's election opens the possibility of a national alliance
with Communist nations.
* *
CUSTOMS AGENTS will begin within the week to search all
hand-luggage;carried by passengers boarding international flights
at the nation's 33 "gateway" airports.
The new program, designed to thwart potential Arab guerrilla
hijackers, has already begun at three international ports, the Treasury
Department said yesterday.
"The new program will include instructions to customs inspectors
to examine the hand-baggage of outbound passengers and, whenever
appropriate, suspected individuals will be searched for instruments of
piracy and sabotage," the announcement said.
Luggage searches for weapons are dne more step in the Govern-
ment's attempt to insure that guerrillas do not hijack commercial
airliners. It has already begun assigning armed plaincothes guards
to some flights.
About 10 airports will be added today, with the others to follow
next week.

U. S.
rail

blocks
s trike

WASHINGTON () - President Nixon signed executive
orders yesterday blocking a threatened nationwide rail strike
for 60 days.
Acting under provisions of the Railway LaborAct, Nixon
created a five-member fact-finding board to lo'ok into the
dispute between four unions and some 160 rail lines.
If settlements are not arranged at the end of 60 days, the
unions will be free to strike - unless Congress should enact
emergency legislation in the interim.
W. J. Usery, assistant secretary of labor, told newsmen at

1

SUNDAY, SEPT. 20
B'Bth

-Associated Press
Protest military contracts,

I

A NUTRITION EXPERT said- yesterday that television ad- Demonstrators outside the annual shareholders meeting of Honey-
vertising is a major source of erroneous nutritional information. well, Inc. in Wilmington, Del. yesterday, show their objection to
Critic Robert Choate told a panel of the House Democratic Study military contracts the company holds. The group also protested
CriicRobrtChotetol apanl f te ous Dmocatc Sud Honeywell's consideration of a proposed merger with G.E. Coin-
Group that cereals with low nutritional value are heavily plugged on puteyDivisons
prime-time "kiddie" television.'pater Division.
Choate ran replays of cereal ads on television monitors to show
the congressmen what children see on Saturday morning between STUDENTS POLLED:
cartoons.

5:00-ISRAELI FOLK DANCING
BUZZY GORDON,: Leader'
6:00-DELI HOUSE
(The Best Kosher food in AA)

"Youngsters who stay glued to the television set on weekends re-
main ignorant of the grade of the top twenty cereals," Choate said.'
Less nutritious cereals are "huckstered" to a greater degree than
quality ones, Choate added.
Choate also criticized government agencies for not imposing
stricter regulations on advertising, labelling, nutritional claims andI
placement of products on grocery shelves.
I believe we are a nation of nutritional illiterates," he said.

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Survey shows 99%,
f, 0
favor confrontation
BERKELEY, Calif. (A)-Con- Fifty-seven per cent rejected
rontation with the "Establish- the idea that outside agitators
cent" was advocated by 99 per and professional troublemakers
ent of 1,542 seniors surveyed are fomenting campus unrest.
t 10 American schools by the Twenty-two per cent were un-
niversity of California's Cen- sure and 21 per cent said they
er for Research and Develop- thought outsiders were to blame.
ent in Higher Education, re- Researchers also found that
earchers reported yesterday. 77 per cent of students surveyed
Only 28 p e r cent, however, said they did not want to ex-
avored physical disruption to lude communists from teach-
chieve their aims while 52 per ing in college, while 12 per cent
ent supported nonviolent pro- do.
est. and 19 per cent peaceful Another 87 per cent agreed
etitioning. with the statement: "A person
Those interviewed w e r e de- w h o advocates unpopular ac-
cribed as mostly white, middle tions or holds unpopular ideas,
ass, above-average students no matter how extreme, should
raduating last spring and sum- be allowed to s p e a k to stu-
ier from 10 widely-diverse dents." Only 6 p e r cent dis-
hools, the researchers said. agreed, researchers said.
Of those polled, 86 per cent The center's study was under
aid they were active partici- the direction of Sara Cirese, a
ants in, or in sympathy with, clinical psychologist, and Jeff
ntiwar demonstrations on their Koon, a research assistant in
ampuses. Only 9 per cent were the center's studies dealing with
eutral on Vietnam, and 5 per students in higher education.
nt opposed student protest to The center said the findings
ie war. had been forwarded to the Pres-
Asked to respond to the state- ident's Commission on Campus
ent, "Basically the U.S. is a Unrest.
icist society," 73 per c e n t The center would not identify
greed, 17 per cent disagreed the colleges surveyed, saying
nd 10 per cent said they didn't they were guaranteed anonym-.
now. ity.

the White House the Admin-
istration had hoped to win
union - industry agreements
without resort to emergency
procedures and that it w a s
"with great reluctance" that
the Labor Department recom-
mended signing of the execu-
tive orders.
The four unions involved rep-
resent about 400,000 rail employ-
es - about 70 per cent of all
those employed by the industry.
.A strike had been set for Sept.
10, but the government won un-
ion agreement to extend discus-
sions for five days - a move fol-
lowed by a federal court o r d e r
Tuesday blocking any selective
strikes against some of the rail
lines involved.
District Judge Howard Corcoran
left in force an order restraining
the unions f r o m striking until
1:45 p.m. EDT Sept. 23.
The judge acted less than an
hour after the unions called the
strike and just 30 minutes after
members of the United Transpor-
tation Union picketed the Chesa-
peake and Ohio Railroad at Hunt-
ington, West Virginia.
President C. L. Dennis of the
AFL-CIO Brotherhood of Rail-
way Clerks, said the strike was
planned against the Southern Pa-
cific and the Baltimore and Ohio
Railroad, in addition to the C&O.
The five-member board that
Nixon set up to 1 o o k into the
strike dispute is larger than any
previous board has been. M o s t
such panels have three members. I
Usery said a larger board was
being named to consider all the
disputes on a consolidated basis,
"so that an equitable settlement
may be reached at t h e earliest
possible time."
He expressed hope that nego-
tiations in which federal media--
tors had participated had already
narrowed .the points in dispute
and that the board could quickly
zero in on those of major im-
portance.
Under the rail labor law, the
board -. its members will be nam-
ed later - will report findings to
Nixon within 30 days. There will
be an additional period of 30 days
in which the disputants can con-
sider the board's recommendations
and continue negotiations.

Official 'i
HUD .quits;
cies racism
WASHINGTON (P) - A top
government open-housing official
resigned yesterday, accusing the
Nixon administration of encour-
aging and perpetuating racial dis-
crimination in housing.
Robert Affeldt said he became
"very, very frustrated" in his one
year as director of conciliation
in the housing opportunity divi-
sion of the Department of Hous-
ing and Urban Development.
He is leaving the,$24,000-a-year
government post to return to the
University of Toledo as a law pro-
fessor.
"The Nixon administration is
not only indifferent to fair hous-
ing but is actively opposing it by
acts of commission and omis-
sion," Affeldt told a news con-
ference. "As a result of t h i s
policy, the federal government is
encouraging and perpetuating ra-
cial discrimination in h o u s i n g,
employment and education."
He accused administration of-
ficials of sabotaging the depart-
ment'q limited conciliation of dis-'
crimination comiplaints and of re-
fusing to withhold federal'aid-
as he contended is permitted by
law-from communities that balk
at enforcement of open housing.
Affeldt's comments appear to
reinforce similar complaints re-
cently from private civil rights or-
ganizations, some members of
Congress, and from the chairman
of the U.S. Civil Rights Commis-
sion, the Rev. Theodore M. Hes-
burg. --
Secretary of Housing George
Romney, while publicly commit-
ted to an "open communities"
policy, has said the language of
the landmark 1968 open housing
law is too gentle to sanction large
scale cutoffs of federal aid to
cities and towns that resist open
housing.
By coincidence, Affeldt an-
nounced his resignation about the
same time Asst: Atty. Gen. Wil-
liam H. Rehnquist was telling the
Federal Bar Association t h a t
federal employes who differ pub-
licly with the administration may
lose their jobs.

President Nixon

Regents approve expansion of
University Record, new housing

(Continued from Page 1)
financing and construction bids
for Northwood V, a 400-unit
apartment complex for married
students on North Campus.
The cost of the project would
,be about $9.5 million 'said Vice
President and Chief 1inanc-
ial Officer Wilbur Pierpont and
the scheduled completion date is
the end of 1972.
During the discussion of t h e
matter Regent Otis Smith (D-
Detroit) asked if the University
had any housing philosophy and
what housing priorities are.
"It's very clear that everyone
agrees that married student hous-
ing is first priority," Vice Presi-
dent for Student Services Robert
Knauss said.
"We do think the next area we

have to look at is single student
housing," added John Feldkamp.
director of housing. "A program
has been in the planning stage for
three or four years but each time
we hit a snag."
* Vice President for Research
Geoffrey Norman told the Re-
gents that the - University per-
formed $62.4 million of research
during 1969-70.
"For three years the expendi-
ture rate has been plateaued at
just over $60 million," 1Norman
said, adding that he does not ex-
pect any rise in federal funds
available for research for three or
four years.
Norman said the University has
1600 to 1700 research projects at
any one time and he claimed that
a substantial percentage are re-

levant to today's social problems.
In other action, the Regents de-
cided to appeal the LaVerne Hill
case. The state Civil Rights Com-
mission ruled earlier this month
that the University had discrim-
inated against Mrs. Hill, a former
nurse at University hospital.
The Regents also ruled that
from now on a University student
can neither gain nor lose state
residency status by marriage. Pre-
viously the residency of a wife
followed that of her husband.
Finally, the Regents appointed
Angus Campbell as director of the
Institute for Social Research and
astronomy Prof. William Hiltner
as chairman of the'astronomy de-
partment.

TODAY
Doors
Open
6:45

DIAL 8-6416

TODAY
Shows at
7, 9 P.M.

"EXTRAVAGANTLY F U N N Y performances by
Wilder, Griffith, and especially Sutherland!"
TIME MAGAZINE
"WHAT A PLEASURE TO LAUGH! The acting to a
man is wildly funny!"

CH
"JUST FUNNY! JUST GREAT!"
CHIC
"VERY 'FUNNY . . . lush and lavish!"
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ICAGO TRIBUNE
AGO SUN-TIMES
JUDITH CRIST

ME and MY BROTHER
IN COLOR
directed by Robert Frank, with Allen Ginsberg, Alan Chaikin
"Occasionally shocking in its graphic presentations of sex in all
forms, but completely involving and finally profoundly moving in

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