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September 02, 1970 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Four--Student ,Activities

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, September 2,, 19?t?'

Rv.. . _. .:. ... . . . .,

Black student groups

active at

(U'

STAEPRE~
SLIM FITS
Levi's guys Ilk
long, lean look

Slim Fits. Choc
yours from.
several differe
all Sta-Prest
crease that wo
U

V . . . . ... .
ST4
e the
cof these
ose
nt fabrics f'
f, With the +}'
n't quit-.
f'f
1111 S. UNIVERSITY

By LINDSAY CHANEY
and SHARON WEINER
Black student groups on cam-
pus are following up the suc-
cessful two-week class strike of
last year for increased minority
admissions with several sup-
portive services and community
projects.
The strike, which was led by
the Black Action- Movement
(BAM) centered on raising the
percentage of black students at
the University to 10 per cent by
the fall of 1973, and having 900
new black students at the Uni-
versity by the fall of 1971.
But although the BAM strike
(described in detail in the Aca-
demics section of this supple-
ment) captured the most atten-
tion of black student actions,
the groups were active in other
programs as well, including a
community breakfast program
in the schools and the Univer-
sity's Afro-American program-
expanding the courses in that
program to 28.
The Black Action Movement
is a coalition of all black groups
on campus. Within BAM, there

are various committees
focus on specific problems
by 'black students.
One such committee is t
ter-City Support Com
which sends its members t
,schools in Detroit to wor
counselors and school ad
trators in informing black
school students aboutc
tunities for blacks at the
versity
The committee workst
cruit black students und
Opportunity Awards Pro
which is for disadvantage
dents of all races, alt]
blacks make uprthe, majo
awards students.
The Opportunity Award
gram is designed to provid
portive services-counselin
tutoring-to disadvantage
dents who don't qualify f
mission to the University
the normal admissionss
ards, but who show aca
promise based on indicato
connected with traditiona
scores and high school gri
Many of the Unive
schools and colleges sp
black student organizatio

which
faced
he In-
mittee,
o high
k With
minis-
k high
oppor -
e Uni-
to re-
er the
ogram,
d stu-
hough
rity of
s Pro-
le sup-
ig and
d stu-
or ad-

A group in the medical school
provides laboratory practical
work during the summer for
black undergraduate students
who plan to enter medical
school.
The Black Law School Al-
liance (BLSA), composed of
black law students, has been
working to admit larger num-
bers of black students to the
law school and has been urging
various curriculum c h a n g e s.
BLSA has also been active in
the legal aid aspect of law in
Washtenaw county - its mem-
bers have represented welfare
mothers and others accused of
civil disobedience actions.
And in a "trial," last Novem-
ber, the BLSA convicted the
Law School of being a racist in-
stitution.

'I

I

We need your money!
You need used books!
LET'S GET TOGETHER!
STUDGNT BOOK SGRVICG
Somewhere in the vicin ht
of Greene's Cleaner
761-700

under A demand of a "black caucus"
stand- of the education school that the
idemic number of black students and
irs not faculty be increased to 20 per
al test cent was endorsed by the
ades. school's faculty and excutive
rsity's board last year.
ponsor , And other black groups are
ns. corking on establishing an
O Afro-American Studies Center,
putting out a black newsletter,
and organizing blacks within
the fraternity-sorority system.
The main , concern of the
Black Student Union (BST) this
fall will be to disseminate in-
formation to incoming black
freshmen, say BSU leaders. BSU
has an office in the Student
Activities Bldg. and makes itself
available to all students having
questions about black organiza-
tions at the University.
One of BSU's projects will be
to sponsor, along with the Coali-
tion for the Utilization of Learn-
ing Skills and the Office of
Orientation, a program in the
fall called "Our Black Thing."
The program, which is sched-
uled for Aug. 31 to Sept..5, will
include seminars on the rele-
vance of a college education to
the black community, sessions
Y with University administrators
,S on general information about
the University, and various so-
cial activities.

BAM spokesman Ed Fabre

"During this orientation, all
black organizations on campus
will be able to talk with the
new black students," explains
Gloria Woodard, co-chairman of
the orientation project.
"This is an opportunity for
black freshmen to meet other
black freshmen as well as black
upperclassmen," she adds.
The Coalition for the Utiliza-
tion of Learning Skills, an or-
ganization connected with the
Opportunity A w a r d s program
and with the literary college, is
working on a "developmental,
not4'emedial program for fresh-
men," according to its assistant
project director Clyde Williams.
The freshman year study pro-
gram will be led by teaching fel-
lows and undergraduate seniors
in conjunction with certain sec-
tions of freshman courses.
"We want to teach students
how to approach different types
of courses," Williams says, and
adds that the project is not ex-

perimental but is based on per-
formances of study groups in
the past.
Another project of 'U' black
groups has been the Martin
Luther King Fund, which was
established nearly three years
ago to provide scholarships for
needy black students.
Money for the fund was -orig-
inally raised through "one time
only" solicitations in the busi-
ness community. Those began to
fall off. however, and last
spring, BAM asked for a ref-
erendum so that students could
vote on a proposed $3 fee assess-
ment for the fund.
Although students voting in
the referendum agreed to the
assessment, it was rejected by
the Regents. The administra-
tion has, along with BAM, be-
gun solicitating local private
foundations for money for the
. fund, which, as of last spring,
claimed about $250,000..
I, ---- E

*V

)p

ifas

I

1 J J. Urversity

_ . . . . . _ _ - - _ . . . . - - .

it

Aro~AFA8

Y'

I

t ,

cash
a , A R
Can be &6
a bummer.
Sure cash is convenient. We'll>>
be first .to admit that. But it can t
also be a real hassle. You'd
know what we mean if, for ex-
ample, you lost your hard
earned tuition bread. Or your
bucksfor books. Bad scene.
Plus when you dig the far-out f
benefits which accompany an
Ann Arbor Bank checking ac-
count like, a complete expense
record. Cancelled checks for
proof of payment,(they also
make wild wallpaper), safety
against the risk of loss by ac-
cident or otherwise. Not to
mention the out-of-sight con-
venience of 4 campus offices. Is
carryirg a large amount of jack
worth the hassle? We don't s{:.
think so. And a lot of groovy
people agree.
So why not check out a cool checking account at A2 Bank. You can choose minimum balance
checking ($200) or the special check plan with no minimum balance and only 100 per check.
So turn on to an Ann Arbor Bank checking account. Your gain may very well be ... no loss. Dig?
Ann Arbor Bank... on the groove with you in mind.

:.< ?
r'
r
' :$ f' . >
.....
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5 '
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S5. S '.
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,M1S4

T.V. RENTALS
$10.50/mo.
NEJAC T.V.
662-5671

3
yy'f
J
S
i
}
t
f4 ''' }:j
Y,

r.

For generations,
the name Follett
ihas been
synonomous with
stud~ent saving.

;, . ,

I

.SUPER
SLIMS
ThIe ng,
lean Levi's
look-in
rugged
pre-shrunk
XX blue
denim-the
toughest!
Stock up
now.

Co nf used?
KEEP ABREAST
of
CAMPUS EVENTS
t7 -l

FOLLETT'S BOOKSTORE
322 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104

bv

If you'd like a helpful "Get Acquainted with the Campus and Ann
coupon.
---------------------------------------
Ann Arbor Bank
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48107
Attn: Carl Martinson r

Arbor" folder, simply mail this

t

ANN

I

. I1

If -_Iof 1E

I

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