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September 17, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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6FI1BENWY)OUSB
PRESENTS
ALL THE
FLOATING",OPERA
'YOU CAN EAT
THURS., SEPT. 17 ADMISSION $1.00
Thursday-Friday, Sept. 17-18
WAGiES O'F FEAR
dir. GEORGES CLOUZOT (1951)
Yves Monyand trucks nitroglycerin in
Central America. A truly explosive
film.
T&9:05 Architecture
662-8871 75 Auditorium

pae three

P

xrl i gtt

Bttii

Thursday, September 17, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

news briefs
$y Te AssocaedJPres
A FEDERAL JUDGE in Brooklyn, New York ruled the Viet-
nam war constitutional yesterday, and said neither President
Johnson nor Nixon had usurped their power in waging it.
"The Congress repeatedly and unmistakingly authorized the
use of armed forces of the United States to fight in Vietnam," Dist.
Judge Orrin Judd Wrote in a 50-page decision.
The decision came in a case involving Malcolm Berk, 21, of
Flushing, Queens, who sought to avoid service in Vietnam, where
he is now stationed. He argued that the war was unconstitutional.
AMERICAN AND ALLIED FORCES continued to suffer var-
ious setbacks in different parts of Indochina yesterday as 15
American helicopters were destroyed or damaged from South1
Vietnam's Mekong Delta to the jungles of southeast Laos. ,
In Cambodia, a big offensive by government forces remained.
stalled. Some combat commanders were reported anxious to call off
the divisions-size drive to avert disaster.
There were urgent talks on the future of the offensive between
senior field officers and the military high command in Phnom Pehn.
Some officers feared that North Vietnamese troops were manuever-
ing into position behind the government task force to cut off the only
withdrawal route.I
* * *
JOHN SINCLAIR, head of the revolutionary White Panther
Party, has been transferred from Marquette Prison in the Upper
Peninsula to Southern Michigan Prison at Jackson. Sinclair is
serving a nine-to-l 1year sentence for possession of marijuana.
Gus Harrison, director of the State Department of Corrections,
said the transfer was both "precautionary" and "routine" since Sin-
clair is scheduled to appear in federal court ih Detroit next week
and, "We were also concerned about possible trouble" at Marquette
Prison.
Harrison denied a report by Sinclair's brother David that the
transfer last Friday came after Sinclair and 60 black prisoners sign-
ed a petition asking for better prison conditions.
FOUR EMPLOYE GROUPS and the railroads resumed in-
direct talks in their deadlocked wage dispute yesterday after a
federal judge lifted his threat of contempt action against 'the
unions.I
District Judge Howard Corcoran dropped the punitive proceed-
ings after being assured that workers had returned to their jobs and
operations were normal on three railroads hit by picketing Tuesday.
Corcoran left in force an order restraining the unions from strik-
ing until 1:45 p.m. EDT Sept. 23. It was the short-lived violation of
that order which provoked the threat of contempt.a
S * *
THE DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION concedes in ar
confidential report to the White House that the much-disputede
supersonic transport may have some harmful effects on the en-t
vironment. But it says they would be minor.
The document presented to the President's Council on Environ-1
mental Quality terms the still unbuilt SST an insignificant polluterI
but adds: "In a few areas additional research is needed to increaser
confidence that largescale SST operations will not significantly af-r
fect the environment."
The report concedes airport noise from the SST would be higherI
than desired and that occupants would receive radiation doses great-C
er than persons flying in subsonic jets at lower altitudes.
* * *r
THE CHIEF SENATE SPONSOR of a constitutional amend-
ment providing for election of the president by direct, popular D
vote conceded defeat yesterday on a key test of strength.
With the Senate set to vote today on whether to cut off debate,a
Sen. Birch Bayh (D-Ind.), told newsmen: "We do not have enough
votes right now."s
A two-thirds majority is required to bring the debate to a halt.r
Bayh said he has no hope of winning that margin now. He placed
the number of votes on his side in the 50's. -

Jordan faces civil war as army,

guerrillas continue

ighting

NEWS PH ONE: 764-0552
BSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

By The Associated Press
The desert kingdom of Jor-
dan teetered on the brink of
open civil war yesterday in a
deepening crisis that split the
4, country into armed camps
and threatened repercussions
throughout the Middle East.
The deepening crisis in Jordan
' heightened the uncertainity about
the fate of 54 airline hijack host-
ages held by Marxist guerrilla op-
ponents of King Hussein's new
military regime.
The, United States is reported
to have evidence the most ad-
vanced type of Soviet surface to
air missiles have been introduced
into the Egyptian cease-fire zone
alohg the Suez Canal.
The SAM-3 sites are presumed
manned by Russian military per-
sonnel. Israel charged .last week
that SAM-3s had been taken into
the zone in violation of a military
standstill agreement paralleling
the cease-fire accord.
Meanwhile, in Washington, a
State Department spokesman said
that Israeli planes have flown ov-
er prohibited areas of the Middle
East ceasefire zone, contrary to
terms of the ceasefire agreement.
On the deserted streets of Am-
-Associated Press man, the Jordanian capital, King
15 miles north of Amman. Huessein's army faced rebellious
defying a plea by the new Palestinian guerrillas demanding
the overthrow of the 34-year-old
_ monarch.
Hussein unleashed the guerril-
las' fury by installing a military
government that immediately im-
posed martial law and promised
to "strike with an iron fist against
anyone creating disorder in the
Field Marshal Habis Majali, a
British-trained Bedouin fiercely
u~e loyal to Hussein and despised by
the Palestinians, was appointed
as military governor with'author-
quent labor settlement, are ity over the entire country.
ted to have great impact. One of Majali's first acts was to
d Motor Co. announced yes- appeal to the guerrillas to respect
y it was increasing the price a new cease-fire with the royal
1971 models by an average army and to lay down their arms.
53 each, but left the door But Yasir Arafat, chief of the
for a further boost when its over-all guerrilla command, con-
act with the United .Auto demned the new regime as Fas-
ers is completed. cist, placed his forces on a state
d was the first of the Big of "emergency alert" and t o I d
to announce prices on all them to defy the order to surrend-
nes. er weapons.

ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
proudly presents its 41st season

-i

"CACTUS FLOWER" Oct. 14-17
"MAN OF LA MANCHA" Dec. 16-20
"SUBJECT WAS ROSES" March 3-6
"BLITHE SPIRIT"March 31-April 3
"IN WHITE AMERICA" April 21-24
"THE BRASS AND GRASS FOREVER" May 5-9
(an original musical)-
DON'T DELAY-ORDER YOUR SEASON TICKETS TODAY
(Use This Coupon)

PALESTINIAN GUERRILLAS stop a truck yesterday in Zarqua, Jordan,7
The guerrilla patrol was one of many that refused to lay down arms, d
military governor appointed by King Hussein.
$100 MILION LOSS DAILY:
Woodcok oins picke
as strike at GM Conti

NAMF

PHONE t

IV11

1MG

ADDRESS,

CIT

Y_

71

41r

Please reserve sets of season tickets, as indicated below,
I have enclosed $ 1 'understand the tickets will be
mailed to me in the fall. I have enclosed a self-addressed,
stamped envelope.
6 SHOWS 5 SHOWS
Wed. balcony $ 8.50 _ $ 7.00
Wed. orchestra 10.50 9.00
Thurs. balcony 8.50 7.00
Thurs. orchestra . 10.50 9.00
Fri. balcony 11.50 10.00'
Fri. orchestra 13.50 12.00
Sat. balcony 11.50 10.00
Sat. orchestra 13.50 12.00
OPTION: If you prefer tickets for only 5 shows, please indicate
which show you wish to omit.
MAIL to P.O. BOX 1993, ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN 48106,

DETROIT IA') -- A veteran of
auto industry picket lines, United
Auto Workers President Leonard
Woodcock joined striking union
members picketing at three Gen-I
eral Motors Corp. plants on De-I
troit's West side yesterday.
The professorial, soft-spoken
leader of some 344,000 striking
union members arrived at the first
plant sites at 7:15.a.m. and step-,
ped into the picket lines to chat!
softly with the pickets.
The. pickets at GM's Flee twood,
Fisher and Cadillac plants, were
orderly and somewhat subdued. AtI
Cadillac, there were only four
picket signs and 25 pickets.
Business and workers, who de-
pend on money spent by, General
Motors Corp. were beginning tol
feel the increased pinch of a strike
against GM.
The company estimates the
strike is costing more than $100'
million each day in lost sales, lost
wages to workers, lost tax revenues
and lost revenues to suppliers.
Some of GM's 39,000 ,suppliers
already have laid off workers and
more are making plans for such
action if the strike continues more
than a week or two. And the im-
pact was felt in other places not
so directly tied to the corporation.
The United Auto Workers struck
GM at 12:01 a.m. Tuesday, idling:
344,000 workers in the U.S. and,
Canada. Another 72,500 employed'
by GM facilities were exempted

from strike action because their
production or work supplied Ford
Motor Co., Chrysler Corp. and
American Motors Corp.
Three-year contracts covering
713,000 Big Three workers all ex-
pired at midnight Monday, but
Ford and Chrysler were exempted
from strike action by the UAW
for the time being.
The price of 1971-model cars is
one area where the strike and the

subsec
expect
E For
terday
of its
of $15
open
contra
Worke
For
Three
car lin

White scores upset in Mass. as
Humphrey nominated to Senate

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

V.

Watch
the landlord
I get his.

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
agedi by students at the Universitv of
SMichigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
gan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $i0 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
Ition -rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mail.

Y
Y
1
i

f

By The Associated Press
Boston Mayor Kevin White won
the Democratic nomination f o r
governor of Massachusetts Tues-
day in the biggest battle of pri-
maries in six states that produced:
no major surprises - unless nom-
inations of two Catholic priests
are so rated.
White lost his home town but
in the four-man r a c e won by
more than 10.000 votes over the
party-endorsed candidate, Senate
President Maurice Donahue. Gov.
Francis Sargent w a s unopposed
for the Republican nomination.
Four Demociatic senators won
renomination - Edward Kennedy

of Massachusetts, John Pastore of
Rhode Island, Henry Jackson of
Washington and Joseph Tydings
of Maryland. Hubert Humphrey
easily captured the Democratic
Senate nomination in Minnesota
to start a political comeback.
Only Tydings ran into trouble,
but he overcame a stiff challenge
from a conservative, George Ma-
honey, a perennial office seeker
who benefited from a gun lobby
campaign. Tydings is a p r i m e
mover for strong gun controls.
His Nov. 3 foe will be Rep. Glenn
Beall Jr., whose father Tydings
unseated in 1964. Beall easily won
the GOP nomination over two op-
ponents.
Two Democratic governors were
renoininated, Marvin Mandel of
Maryland and F r a n k Licht of
Rhode Island, as candidates for
governor were nominated in7 Min-
nesota -and Oklahoma as well as
Massachusetts.

This week's voting produced no
discernible national trend, with
conservatives and liberals b o t h
winning. Th e major victories
seemed attributable more to per-
sonalities than issues.
Of special note was that Ken-
nedy, who faced no opposition for
renomination, ran behind the
Democratic vote for governor in
Massachusetts and behind his
1964 race when he was-unopposed.
With 2,001 of 2,019 precincts in,
Kennedy had 511,557 votes to
659,418 cast for governor, mean-
ing 147,861 voters left Kennedy's
name blank. In 1964 there were
142,115 blanks against 608,791
votes.
The defeat of two veterin
House Democrats, Reps. Philip
Philbin of Massachusetts and
George Fallon of Maryland came
as some surprise although they
had been listed as possible upset
losers.

ML!

Corner State & Liberty Sts.
DIAL 662-6264

1 ;. ..

OPEN 12:45 P.M. SHOWS AT 1-3-5-7-9 P.M.

I

THE LANDLORD'S GETTING JUST ABOUT
EVERYtHING BUT THE RENT

"THE LANDLORD" is about:
Wasps. - The military- Rent parties. :- Arrows dipped in
industrial complex. Fanny's barbeque sauce
to IF k

I

@.

CINEMA' II
screenplay by PINTER;
LOSEY, Dir.
"Bizzaro events surround
an auto crash in0decadent

---- ----_I ------------------ s-

----- ------

An attempted Margie's pot liquor DuBois' school
axe murder. ; and palm readings. in the cellar.
k,.
' I

._ t . ! _ ___

i

academia"

_ _ _

i.

, --.. ; ------------ w - -------------- - ---------------------- i

-L. TAFFER
'Ternatives

He's going to crack your plaster.

....

:: S EEEE'E*EUU UIU

Ii

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I1

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