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September 13, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE:

Sunday, September 13, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

news briefs
By The Associated Press
THE UNITED AUTO WORKERS said last night they were
lowering their first-year wage demands in contract bargaining
with the auto industry, but Leonard Woodcock, UAW president,
said he is "not at all hopeful" for a settlement before a midnight
Monday strike deadline.
After meeting with bargainers for General Motors and Chrysler
yesterday, Woodcock said the union was asking increases which would
raise the average hourly wage in the industry from $4.02 to $4.65 in
the first year of a three-year contract, down from the original wage
demand calling for about a $1 an hour average increase in the first
year.
*
SECRETARY OF STATE William P. Rogers said yesterday
that the Nixon administration is considering economic aid to
Israel, whose finances have, been hard hit in her long struggle
with the Arabs.
Sources said the amount of aid being discussed is in the $400
million-to-$500 million range, though an exact amount has not been
decided pending fuither talks and the outcome of related legislation
in Congress.
SOUTH VIETNAMESE Vice President Nguyan Cao Ky dis-
closed yesterday that he will most likely address a "March for
Victory" rally in Washington next month.
The decision appeared likely to evoke dismay in the U.S. embassy
in Saigon and the Nixon administration in Washington as U.S. of-
ficials and some South Vietnamese leaders fear Ky's appearance
could touch'off antiwar demonstrations. They also felt the address
might prove politically embarrassing occurring only a month before
U.S. congressional elections.

U.S. financing of S. Korean
combat troops nears $1 billion

WASHINGTON (P) - The Unit-
ed States has paid nearly $1 bil-
lion to finance South Korean com-
bat troops in Vietnam, including
special allowances to some sold-
iers twenty times their normal
homefront pay.
The outlay since 1965, which
was outlined by the State De-
partment ands Pentagon dfficials
beford the Senate's Foreign rela-
tions subcommittee on security
and agreements and commit-
ments abroad, totals more than
three times wnat the United
States has paid other allied na-
tions for help in Vietnam.
But it was still only part of a
tough bargain driven by t h e
South Koreans before fielding
a Vietnam force:now numbering
some 50 men.
Other terms, as outlined in se-
cret senate testimony made public
yesterday, included statements by
U.S. officials that appeared ' to'
imply this nation might go be-
yond its treaty obligations in de-
fense of South Korea.
The United States also pledged
to maintain "powerful" forces in
South Korea, promising not ,to
withdraw any troops without prior
consultation with Seoul.
It agreed also to suspend a de-{
cision to switch billions in mili-
tary assistance programs funded?

with other allied countries in In-
dochina.
The subcommittee went out of
its way to: say it was not being
critical of S. Korea or Any other
,nations they had looked at, only
critical of the United States and
its policies.
Most of this criticism ceritered
on the practice of paying big
special allowances to South Kor-
ean. troops. A table accompany-
ing the heavily censored trans-
cript showed that a South Kor-
ean private normally earns $1.60 a
month. The same private sent to
Vietnam, however, is , aid an a'd-
ditional $37.50 a month.
William J. Porter, U.S. ambas-
sador to South Korea, insisted
under questioning that Korean
troops were fighting in South
Vietnam out of a sense of grat-
itude 'for U.S. help two decades
ago and not because of the allow-
ances.
Previous testmony before t h e
subcommittee, headed by Sen.
Stuart Symington (D-Mo) showed
the United States had paid some
240 million to Thailand and 40
million to the Phillipines.
The. Koreans, however, h a-v e
had far more combat troops in
Vietnam that any other ally in-
cluding Australia which pays its
own way.

-

Sen. Symington
from the purchase of consumable
items such as oil and clothing for
the South Korean Army, to the
purchase of hardware -a decis-
ion that has set back moderni-
zation of the South Korean Army
while being profitable for t h e
country's businessmen.
In some respects, especially the
payment of combat allowances,
the arrangements were similar to
agreements the United States has

NADER CONSUMER WARNING

I

Wake

up and

watch

that cherry

SIGMA ClI
Contrary to popular belief the days of physical
and mental hazing as a part of the fraternity system
are past. Sigma Chi s, unique atmosphere serves as a
foundation on which the individual can develop his'
own attitudes, beliefs, and convictions.
We are not a political organization. Many have

WASHINGTON 0)
had been inspecting
all through the meal.

- Ralph Nader
his food closely

Ix

Now he scooped the two red cherries
from atop his fruit salad. "I want you to
notice that I'm taking out the mar-
aschino cherries," he said. "They
should ban those things. That dye is
dangerous, really bad."
Nader has long urged - so far unsuc-
cessfully - that red dye used in the
cherries be banned because experiments
show the chemical causes cancer in test
animals.
Maraschino cherries are a typical Nad-
er target. They may seem tivial in a
world fractured by war, revolution and
balanc of terror politics, but to Nader,
all these things are a test of who's in
charge here.
"It's all part of citizenship issues,"
said Nader. "If you can't get people in-
terested in things that affect t h e m
most closely, how can you get them in-
terested in things that are more re-
mote?"

dents, Nader sees student involvement
as the biggest dividend from his work.
"It can all be done by the students.
The power is there," he says.
Nader is a man without title in a
town where nearly everybody has one.
He usually is dubbed "consumer ad-
vocate," but to him the job goes by-
yond blowing the whistle on unsafe cars,
exploding pipelines. contaminated meat
or cancerous additives in food.
"I define consumer almost the same as
citizen," he says.'
"The science of citizenship is in about'
the state of physics in the age of Archi-.
medes. The citizen has got to learn to
make societ work for him. People don't
look at citizenship as a science. It should
be the one study above all.
"I used to ask myself: what motivates
people to look out for their interests?,
Why don't they take a r e a 1 interest?
They weren't getting facts on who's re-
sponsible for what."
In the past years, Nader has set up the
center for the Study of Responsive Law,
a loosely organized staff of young law-

yers and students which has studied the
Food and Drug Administration, Inter-
state Commerce Commission; Federal
Aviation. Agency and other government
departments.
More recently, Nader set up the Public
Interest Research Group to pick up
where the Center leaves off. The Group
will initiate lawsuits, both on its own
and in cooperation with citizens.
"I notice some opening up," he says.
"It's much easier now to get facts out of
the government.
"But there's so much left to be done.
The government has no capability for
self reform, a great capability for cover-
ing up.
"It's a manpower problem. With our
limited manpower we've done some amaz-
ing things. But' we need at least 20 per
cent of the lawyers and professional peo-
ple working in the public interest."
Nader considers students to be the best
bet 'for getting that 20 per cent, com-
pared with the 1 per cent or so of law-
yers he says are doing what they call pro
bono publico work.

I

accused us of being apathetic, but this is far from the
truth. We are not politically active as a group because
group pressures tend to limit and restrict the individ-
ual. We feel it is far better for the individual to reach
out and experience on his own rather than be bound
by certain written or unwritten regulations of a par-
ticular group.
U U
As a result of this attitude, Sigma Chi attracts a
unique cross section of people. It is extremely impor-
tant in life to be able to communicate with all people,
and Sigma Chi serves its members and the community
by encouraging this environment to exist.
All we ask is that you take a look for yourself.
SIGMA CHii
548 S. STATE (Next to the Union)

Ralph Nader ,Dealing extensively w
Sot.-Sun., Sept. 12-13
Lonesome Cowboy
dir. ANDY WARHOL (1967)
Real modern art from the modern West-
with all your favorites-Machismo-
Joe D'Allesandro, Viva Superstar and Rav-
ing Taylor Mead.
Sept. 14-MANDABI
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8871 75c Auditorium
The last time
Virgil Tibbs
had aday
like this
was
"InThe
Heat
Of The
Night"9

ith

college stu-

SALE
10 GAL. COMPLETE AQUARIUM SET
$9.99
Includes: Tank, pump, fitter, heater, charcoal,
glasswool, thermometer, and book.

I

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THE MIRISCH PRODUCTION COMPANY presents
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inAWALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
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