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September 12, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-12

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4 Saturdav September 12. 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven

11IF7

THICIANDY ae ee

Cards,
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Bob Gibson
fired a five-hitter-for his 21st vic-
tory of the season, pitching St.1
Louis to a 5-2 victory over New
York last night that dropped the ,
Mets out of their share of the Na-
tional League's East Division lead.
The loss dropped New York
into second place in the hectic NL
East race, one-half game behind
Pittsburgh and one-half g a m e
ahead of Chicago. Both the Pi- |
rates and Cubs had yesterday off.,
Joe Hague started the rally in
the fourth with a single and Joe,
Torre walked. Jose Cardenal's
double into the left field corner
drove in two runs and then Car-
denal moved to thid on a wild!
on thisc

bump
pitch and scored on Carl Taylor's
single.
Ted Simmons walked and then
pulled a double steal with Taylor.
When Jerry Grote's throw sailed
into center field, Taylor scored the
fourth run of the inning.

Mets

out

of

first

daily.
sports

: .> ,..........
...r' ........ .
...s,... .

Major League Standings

;.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
East

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Blue blazes NIGHT EDITOR:
KANSAS CITY - Vida Blue, a ELLIOT LEGOW
21-year-old left-hander with only
42 major league innings behind I Kelly
him, stopped Kansas City on one smashed a grounder into right
hit - Pat Kelly's two-out single field, then went on the record his
in the eighth inning -as th second victory and first complete
Oakland A's blanked the Royals game in the majors.
3-0 last night.
Blue, making his second start
since the A's recalled him from Bengals bounced
the minors eight days ago, sty- DETROIT - Mike Epstein rip-
ped a home run and rookie right-
Sn d that hander Bill Gogolewski picked up
his first major league victory last

Baltimore
New York
Boston
Detroit
Cleveland
Washington
Minnesota
Oakland
California
Kansas City
Milwaukee
Chicago

W
93
81 f
75
74
69
67
West
87
79 1
76 1
56
53
51

L
51
63
69
70
76
76
56
65
66
87
89
93

Pet.
.647
.562
.520
.518
.476
.469
.610
.549
.535
.390
.373
.353

GB
12
18
19
241/
251/2
31
33
361 /

Pittsburgh
New York
Chicago
St. Louis
Philadelphia
Montreal
Cincinnati
Los Angeles
San Francisco
Atlanta
Houston
San Diego

East
W L
76 67
'76 68
75 68
69 76
66 79
62 81
West
93 53
77 65
75 68
71 75
69 75
55 89

Pct.
.531
.527
.524
.476
.454
.434
.637
.542
.524
.486
.480
.382

GB
-
72
102
132

14
22
23
37

Yesterday's Results
Baltimore 3, Boston 2
Cleveland 3, New York 2
Washington 4, Detroit 2
Minnesota 6, Chicago 0
Oakland 3, Kansas City 0
Milwaukee at California, inc.
Today's Games
Milwaukee at California, night
Oakland at Kansas City
Chicago at Minnesota
Washington at Detroit
New York at Cleveland
Boston at Baltimore, night

Yesterday's Results
Montreal 1, Philadelphia 0
St. Louis 5, New York 2
Houston 3, Atlanta 2
Cincinnati at San Diego, inc.
Los Angeles at San Francisco, inc.
Only games scheduled
Today's Games
Philadelphia at Montreal
St. Louis at New York
Pittsburgh at Chicago
Atlanta at Houston, night
Cincinnati at San Diego, night
Los Angeles at San Francisco

The Werd Bunch,
vintsae'70 i
eric siegel
TIE LAST time the Pittsburgh Pirates won the Nationali
League pennant, Richard Nixon was a lame duck vice I
president.
That was back in 1960, and the stars of the team were
Vernon Law, baseball's ,upreme preacher-pitcher; Elroy Face, a
5-5, 150 pound guitar-picking fork ball relief pitcher who won
18 games; Roberto Clemente, a young rightfielder; Forrest H.
"Smokey" Burgess, the best bad ball hitting catcher west of1
Yogi .Berra; and a bunch of scrappers like Billy Vernon, Don
Hoak, Dick Groat and Bill Mazeroski.
Oh, yes, and a pitcher named Vinegar Bend Mizell, and
what else can you say about a guy whose first name is
Vinegar Bend and who later went into politics in North
Carolina?
The '60 Pirates were, on the whole, what baseball people
like-to call "flakey" The flakiest thing they"did all year, and
the one they are most remembered for, was beating the New
York Yankees in the World Series, four games to three. This
despite being out-scored 55 to 27 and losing the three games by
scores of 16-3, 12-0, and 16-0.
The only members of the original Wierd Bunch who are
still around are Clemente, Mazeroski and a mediocre, parttime
pitcher named Joe Gibbon. And, of course, manager Danny
Murtaugh, who returned this spring after being out of baseball
with illness since 1964.l
The Bucs, though, have their fair share of new ]
"flakies". The catcher, Manny Sanguillen, used to teach
Sunday School in Panama and still carries around a
Spanish translation of a Billy Graham book. Richie Hebner,
the third baseman, digs graves in the off-season, and talks
about it like he was a night-club performer.
Clemente, who has had everyone in Pittsburgh, especially
the front office, wondering during the past 10 years about his
visits to the chiropractor, while opposings teams wondered
about his batting average, has topped his alleged hypochondria
with the now-infamous story of his kidnapping.
And the Pirates also lay claim to the smallest utility in-
fielder in the majors, 5-4 Freddie Patek. This in itself isn't
that odd, but it is interesting to note that 10 years ago they
claimed the smallest relief pitcher in Face.
Then there is the running battle between Murtaugh
and Mazeroski about the propriety of spitting chewing sto-
bacco on the artificial turf. Murtaugh says it stains
the turf; Mazeroski says it doesn't.
But even with this flakey cast, the wierdest happenings
don't even involve the players. An example, for those who need
one, was the demolition last week of the Bucs' $100,000 auto-
matic tarpaulin. It seems the tarp, which operated electrically
and was supposed to rise from the ground and roll itself across
the field, got stuck and forced the suspension of a game that
the Pirates were leading 4-1.
When you're battling for the pennant, you don't like to
throw away 4-1 games like that, even in Pittsburgh.
Then, too, there is the oddity of Three Rivers Stad-
ium, the Pirates' new home with no new roads leading up to
it. And last month there was a power blackout when the
Dusquene Power Company shut off electricity around the
stadium because of a four-alarm fire. The lights didn't
stay out, though, and Tom Seaver hurled the Mets to a
10-2 victory.
The pennant drive has had Bob Prince, the voice of the
Pirates whose pollution of the air is second only to that of the
steel mills, talking about the "Buc Fevah" since last June.
That Prince is pushing the Pirates is really no surprise, since he
is bankrolled by Buc GM Joe Brown.
(A suburban newspaper blasted Prince in an editorial
last month for promoting future Pirates games instead of re-
porting the current play-by-play, which may be something of
a first itself.),
A little more surprising to some people is that the
Pirates are still in the thick of the race, with essentially
the same cast which finished third last year. A lot of the
Mets-Cubs-Cards advocates picked Pittsburgh as a dark-
horse, but you got the feeling that it was half-hearted.
They're all hitters but their pitching staff, with the excep-
tion of Dave Giusti, would have trouble holding the line
against a bunch of rambunctious Little Leaguers.
But at least their pitching staff is honest. "Only in
America," said Bucs' pitcher Steve Blass earlier this year, "can
a guy look at a map and place Cincinnati in the West and
St. Louis in the East. I don't know who did it, but whoever
wins this division ought to vote the guy a full playoff share."
m um.v..--o
NEW IN ANN ARBOR
Scores

night as the Washington Sena-
tors stopped Detroit, 4-2, extend-
ing the Tigers' losing steak to four
games.
Epstein slammed his 18th hom-
er in the second inning off loser!
Joe Niekro, 12-12, and the Sena-I
tors added a pair of runs in the'
fourth on run-scoring singles by
Ed Brinkman and Paul Casanovar
* * *

--Associated Press
VIDA BLUE, Oakland's young lefthander recently recalled from the minors, pitched a one-hitter
last night as the Athletics defeated Kansas City, 3-0. The Royals' only hit was a single by Pat Kelly,
with two out in the eighth.

Yankees loss lowered Baltimore's TA OBA TO PUNT:
magic number to seven in the
American League East race.
I f*n *

.........--

0

Birds fly Sox shut out
BALTIMORE - Mark Belanger MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
rapped a run-scoring single in the Harmon Killebrew unloaded h i s
13th inning, giving the Baltimore 41st homer and Frank Quilici his
Orioles a 3-2 victory over t h e second last night as the Minne-
Boston Red Sox last night. sota Twins drubbed the Chicago
The victory, coupled with t h e White Sox 6-0.
PA4R-THREE GOLF
Different strokes
for different folks

1me, game is

ff

By JIM KEVRA
Finally, in its omnipotent bu-
reaucracy, the Michigan Athletic
Department has made a move to
help the average student. Knowing
about the constantly crowded con-
ditions on the Michigan golf
course and the scarcity of open
fields for practice areas, the Ath-
letic Department has reopened the
old Michigan par 3 golf course.
The par 3 course is located on
Main Street, only about a drive
and a three wood from the regula-
tion course, and, while it is not
the greatest course in the world, it
does allow a golfer to polish up
his short game at a reasonable
price, fifty cents for students and
faculty and a dollar for everyone
else per nine holes.
At present, the course is open
only on weekends but there is sel-:
dom much of a wait to tee off.
For an experienced, skillful
golfer, the course doesn't provide
too much of a test. Most of the
holes are merely a pitch aIi d a
putt but there are a fewinterest-
ing tests.
The fifth hole is a downhill parI
three of about 140 yards (although;
the hole is listed at about 152
yards, one soon finds out that the
yardages marked are about 10 per
cent too high) to a slightly ele-
vated green with trees to the right
and behind the green. In addition,
there is a trap to the left of the
green making accuracy the prime
incentive.
SIX IS ABOUT the same length
and comes back up the hill. The
tee shot is partially blind with
only the top of the flagstick show-
ing. The green, although trapped
to the left, is fairly wide open
making club selection the biggest
problem.
But the best hole on the course
is number, eight, only about 100
yards long. The hole is quite sim-
ilar to the twelfth hole at Birm-
ingham Country Club (located just
outside of Detroit), home of\ the

1953 P.G.A. Championships and
other major tournaments.
From the tee, one must either
hit a high wedge between two
trees to a sloping green or try to
-un a low run-up shot' under the
branches. Either way, the shot
presents plenty or problems.
The course could stand a few
improvements (like a little water
on the tees and the fairways) but
the greens are in respectable
shape and will hold a well hit shot.
Also, the\ competition on the par
three course is less rabid than' on
the regular course making it a
perfect place for a non-golfer (if
any still exist) to learn the sport.
So, the next time you find the
U of M regulation golf course full
up, like during the I.M. Golf Tour-
nament this weekend, take your
wedge, putter, and six-or-seven-
iron to Main Street (across from
Pioneer High) and test your short
game against a par of 27.

By ELLIOT LEGQWE
A game-winning field goal at-t
tempt in the last seconds. Ai
blocked punt setting up a touch-x
down. A kickoff reutrned all thet
way for a score.
These are some of football's'
most dramatic moments, ard they1
are also the few remaining exam-t
ples of the importance of thel
foot to football.-
Since the offensive and defen-,
sive units are usually out on the
field, they get much more atten-
tion from the average fan than do
the speciality teams. But the lat-
ter are equally important to a9
team's success.
There are three facets to the
kicking game, punting, p 1 a c e
kicking, and kicking off, a n d
Michigan will use a different spec-
ialist for each assignment.
Wolverine coach Bo Schembech-
ler has selected Paul Staroba as
his punter, Tim Killian as his
place kicker, and Dana Coin to
handle the kickoff chores.
Staroba is replacing, graduated
senior Mark Werner as the Mich-
igan punter. Although Staroba has
never punted in a regular season
game, Schembechler is satisfied
with his performance in practice.!
Bo feels the punting will be all:
right. Staroba has more consist-
ancy now than at the .beginning
of practice. However, Schembech-
ler is worried about the Michi-
gan punt coverage.
The team defending against a
punt always has the option eith-

er to try to block the kick or set
up for a long runback. The punt-
ing unit must be able to antici-
pate the defense's moves. "We
teach them to read it (the de-
fense) at the line," Bo explained.
. Behind Staroba, who first ex-
perimented with punting in prac-
tice last fall, will be reserve full-
back Fritz Seyferth, who also has
never punted in a game for the
Wolverines.
The place kicking job, the only
offensive part of the kicking game,
will be handled again by exper-
ienced senior Tim Killian. Last
year Killian split the job with the
now departed Frank Titas. Killian
concentrated on the field goal
kicking while Titas handled the
PAT chores.
The kickoff is one of football's
most dangerous plays. In fact, the
Wolverines omit the kickoff from
their scrimmages for fear of an
injury on an open field run.
Schembechler also views the kick-

.ot'ba 1l
off as one of the games m o r e
crucial plays.,
"If we can keep them down on
the 20 or 25 we're in good shape,
but if they can run it back to the,
35, one first down and they're al-
ready threatening."
For the second season Dana Coin
will have the responsibility of
forcing the opposition to take over
deep in their own territory. Bo
is confident in Coin's ability,
saying "he is much improved over
last season" and the senior de-
fensive end's experience should be
an asset.

Kunstier rs

Curling

I

NEW IN ANN ARBOR
"JUMBO"
STEAK
HOAGIE
1139 Broadway
769-3524

TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

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____ ._

The

at
"208" Wert Huron

UPSET IN DOUBLES:
Court wins in semis

PAUL CAMELET
Dean Tailor
for Men and Women
alterations and remodler, also
specialties in shortening ladies
coats, slacks, and skirts

JOIN US FOR "KICK-OFF WEEKEND'

FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (IP)-Big,
powerful Margaret Court of Aus-
tralia slammed into the women's
final of the U.S. Open champion-
ships yesterday and faced only one
more obstacle - tiny Rosemary
Casals of San Francisco-in her
bid for a rare tennis grand slam.
Seldom venturing to the net but
devastating from the back court,
the 28-year old housewife from
the country town of Albury erased
Nancy Richey of San Angelo, Tex.,
6-1, 6-3.
The 5-foot-2 Miss Casal1s,
thwarted just-short of the last
round the previous two years, ad-
vanced through a 6-2, 6-7, 6-2
victory over Virginia Wade of
Britain, who won the inaugural
open here in 1968.
Nicola Pilic of Yugoslavia and

Pierre Barthes of France won the
men's doubles title by upsetting
Rod Laver and Roy Emerson of
Australia 6-3, 7-5, 4-6, 7-6. The
new champions won the final tie
break 5 points to 2 when Pilic hit
a ball at Emerson, who feel on
the court.
Semifinals in the men's division
are scheduled today at the west
side tennis club with only Cliff
Richey, standing in the way of a
potential Australian monopoly of
this $176,000 event.

NO LONGER WITH
CAMELET BROS.
in business for himself
1103 S. UNIVERSITY
above the drugstore

Sept. 17
Sept. 18
Sept.I 19

-Love's Alchemy
- leaves of Grass
- Love's Alchemy

0

LIKE MUSICAL THEATER?

I

I

I

OPEN RUSH MIXER
Saturday, -September 12
8 P.M.
SIGMA CHI
548 S. State
featuring
The Leaves of Grass

e

11

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
Missouri 38, Baylor 0
EXHIBITION FOOTBALL
Denver 16,-Boston 14
Minnesota 31, Chicago 30

1
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STEAK
HOAGIE
1139 Broadway
769-3524

- I

TV RENTALS
$10.50 per month
NO DEPOSIT
FREE DELIVERY
AND SERVICE
CALL:
NEJAC TV RENTALS
662-5671

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-an all-cam pus- orchestra!

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