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September 12, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-12

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US.

investigates Army after race clash

OPENING TUESDAY
First Appeardnce
in Ann Arbor
EXCITING DUO
WILLIAM
and JOYCE

BERLIN (JP) - A racial confrontation t h a t
shook the U.S. Army's McNair barracks in West
Berlin in August has led to the creation of an in-
terracial fact-finding team.
The Berlin confrontation and a near-riot in-
volving U.S. troops at Schweinfurt in West Ger-
many are the primary incidents to be investigated
by the fact-finding team, which includes White
House aides.
Two of President Nixon's advisers on minority
affairs, Leonard Garment and Robert J. Brown, are
in a group of White House and Department of De-
fense men who are to spend three weeks visiting
American camps and bases in Germany, England,
Spain and Italy.
The incident in the McNair barracks apparently
started when a white soldier called a black soldier
"nigger." A white GI was then hit with a piece of
wood.
The fight escalated as soldiers poured out of
nearby barracks and chose sides by color. Clubs,
rocks and pipes were used as weapons.
Five men were arrested. Eight were treated at a

hospital, including one military policeman. Some
25 men suffered injuries of some sort.
A group of angry blacks refused a direct order
to disperse. Soldier informants say the Berlin Bri-
gade's provost marshal was called a pig. They re-
ported use of the term "boys" by a high-ranking
officer, in an effort to calm things down, infuriated
the blacks.
The chance arrival of a unit from the field in
full battle dress saved the situation from getting
worse, an officer recalls.
"They marched in the gate just as all hell was
breaking loose and were immediately used as riot
control with bayonets fixed.
"If you could .figure out why this thing hap-
pened," the McNair-base officer declared, "then
you could do something about it. But when that
thing got going, it was not a case of unit pride or
even racial pride. All you! had was hate."
The Berlin Brigade has been remarkably free of
outbursts of racial unrest plaguing other Army un-
its based across Germany. That it now has hap-
pened in Berlin, too, underlines far-reaching racial
sensitivity.

Maj. Gen. George M. Seignious II, the Berlin
commander, says firmly, "This situation is endemic
to our whole society, not just the Army."
In an interview, however, Seignious emphasized
that regardless of the original cause, the Army's
leadership must bridge a racial gap wherever it
finds one.
Seignious says a big obstacle is the Army's turn-
over in Europe of almost 100 per cent each year.
The main cause: manpower for Vietnam.
Seignious finds it significant that those involv-
ed in the McNair fighting were for the most part
recent arrivals, men the brigade had not yet es-
tablished real contact with.
The Army in Europe - and the Army generally
- says it helped pioneer integration among Ameri-
cans. Seignious and others declare there is no dis-
crimination in housing, schooling, job assignments,
food or an'ything else that affects a soldier's daily
life.
Black soldiers say this is not always so.
They claim discrimination in such things as
promotions, "even if it is hard to prove." What

seems to gall them most, however, is a belief in a
hidden lack of acceptance that "bny a black nan
can feel because he is black." They see an Army
"power structure" that is mostly white.
Some whites say they felt the blacks over-
reacted at McNair and that a punch in the mouth
for the offending white soldier would have been
enough.
The blacks say that the "officers do not listen to
us," that the name-calling was just a public ex-
pression of what a lot of whites really think, and
that "a black man has to be better than a white
man if he wants to get a job or promotion for which
both are qualified."
It is estimated that one eighth of the 185,000
American soldiers in Europe is black.
The group may find that one of the underlying
points that leads to friction is that there is more
quiet than action in Army duty in Europe. 'The
U.S. Army has been here 25 years since World War
II. The soldiers in Europe have a lot more time to
occupy themselves with personal problems than the
men in action in Vietnam do.

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threeNEWS -PHONE: 764-0552
pagethree BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554
Saturday, September 12, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

Murphy named

NY police chief
NEW YORK {M - Detroit Police Commissioner Patrick
V. Murphy was named yesterday to head the 31,850-man
Police Department in New York City.
He began his law enforcement career as a foot patrolman
in Brooklyn 25 years ago.
"I'm glad to be coming home," said Murphy, 50, as he walk-
'ed into City Hall with Mayor John V. Lindsay. Murphy flew
here from Detroit where he resigned earlier in the day.
S"Pat Murphy's record is one of firm command,". Lindsay
said as he introduced Murphy to a news conference. "In three
cities during the past seven years, he has clearly shown that
he is a take-charge commander who gives his men and the
public strong and decisive leadership."
Murphy thanked Lindsay for -
"your pledge of support and f o r
the broad authority you h a v e
granted me." ouhv
Murphy succeeds Howard R.
Leary in the $41,000-a-year post
effective Oct. 1. -Leary resigned
last weekend to become vice presi- rop os
dent in charge of security for- the
Abraham & Strauss Department
Stores.o g
Murphy previously held high
police posts in Washington, D.C.
and Syracuse. N.Y. W A aixTTIr I13.-An.

it

-Associated Press
Ammunition and food bearer
A Cambodian soldier in his early teens marches to join a battalion
of Cambodian ke-inforcements expected to be sent in . against
communist troops in Srang, 30 miles southwest of Phnom Penh.
DEADLINE MONDAY:.
UA to strike ,m
if demands not met

DETROIT (")-General Motors
will be struck at midnight Mon-
day unless its, $1.9-billion wage
increase offer to the United Auto
Workers Union is boosted, a UAW
official said yesterday after re-
jecting GM's latest three-year
contract proposal.
"The total offer falls far short
of the' mark," said Irving Blue-
stone, codirector of the union's
GM Department. He said GM
would be struck if a better offer
was not made by the time the cur-

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rent three-year contract expires
at midnight Monday.
UAW President Leonard Wood-
cock, advised of the GM contract
offer by telephone, commented:
"God has spoken. It is up to the
subjects now to bow down to the
ground. We won't do it.",
GM's personnel vice president,
Earl Bramblett, said he believes
the new proposal is responsive to
priorities established by the UAW.
GM and Chrysler are the un-
ion's twin strike targets. UAW
leaders have said, either-or both
-willbe struck unlessa pattern-
setting agreement is written be-
fore the expiration of current
pacts.
Ford, which was struck for sev-
en weeks in 1967, was excluded as
a strike target this year.
The latest GM offer, included a
higher limit on a wage escalator,
tied to increases in the cost of
living. The limit is 16 cents in the
current contract. GM offered to
raise the top to 28 cents an hour
for the life of the proposed new
contract, with a guaranteed mini-
mum increase of 16 cents.
GM moved closer to the union's
demand for retirement after 30
years - regardless of age - at a
monthly pension of $500.

Announcing his resignation in
Detroit, Murphy said he could not
turn down the New York oppor-
tunity.
"Murphy has said in the past
that he would like to be director
of the FBI once J. Edgar Hoover
is through," said a high-ranking
Detroit police-- officer. "The New
York position is the quickest way
to get there."
Murphy's 'transfer from the
5,000-member Detroit police de-
partment to head one six times its
size brought an angry reaction
from Carl Parsell, president of the
Detroit Police Officers Association.
Parsell said: "He's trying to
hitch his star to Mayor John Lind-
say and putting all his eggs in one
basket. He's dumping us because
he figures if Lindsay is elected
President, he'll be named FBI di-
rector.
"I feel this is very unfortunate
for the city, that a guy can come
in here, spend all his time with
the national press and then take
off like a big bird."
Murphy takes 'over a police de-
partment in the throes of an out-
side investigation into reports of
corruption, under a mayor who
has been accused in the past of
putting a reign on police officials
for political purposes.,
Actually, Murphy is taking a
$612 a year cut in salary. He
drew only $31,800 in Detroit, but
received a $9,812 New York pen-
sion, which he loses upon his re-
turn to duty here.,

w. a .tvtrvtv~ '1tanamen
ment to eliminate the runoff pro-
vision from the proposal for elec-
tion of the president by direct
popular vote was called up in the
Senate yesterday.
Sen. Robert P. Griff in, R-Mich.,
offering the amendment with Sen.
Joseph D. Tydings, D-Md., as a
co-sponsor, said it would strength-
en the electoral reform plan and
make it more acceptable.
Griffin said he hopes for a
vote on it early next week, but
Sen. Birch Bayh, D-Ind., chief
sponsor of the popular vote mea-
sure, has served notice he will
resist it.
Griffin said he supports t he
direct election plan but is disturb-
ed by its provision for a ruloff
election if no candidate. gets as
much as 40 per cent of the vote.
In place of a runoff election,
the Griffin-Tydings proposal pro-
vides' that if none, of the candi-
dates received 40 per cent of the
vote, the front-runner would be
'elected. if he had a majority of
the electoral vote under the pre-
sent system.
ShouId no candidate be elected
under either of these alternatives,
the Senate and House would meet
in joint session and elect a presi-
dent.
Griffin said this would 'be "far
superior to and less hazardous
than the runoff prodision." He
said it would help tO discourage
splinter parties and also increase
the chances of making the first
election decisive.

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"THE BRASS AND GRASS FOREVER" May 5-9
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