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September 10, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-09-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thurs., Fri.-Sept. 10, 11
LAST YEAR AT
MARIENBAD
dir. ALAIN RESNAIS (1961)
An early master piece of the New Wave
,by the director of La Guerre est Finie.
SHORT: Battle of the Century,
with LAUREL AND HARDY
7 & 9:05 Architecture
662-8711 75c Auditorium
fU

page three

afire

Sfrttn

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Thursday, September 10, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

By The Associated Press
SECRET FILES show two ship lines gave illegal campaign
contributions to key members of Senate and House committees.
Justice Department records indicate that nearly $6,000 was given
to congressmen who cdntrol a rich flow of federal subsidies for the
shipping firms.
\v}
THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY met criticism yes-
terday when presentingth th Hdadouse Waysalnd.Means Commit- I -
Committee members of both parties qubstioned President Nixon's ~
proposal and chided David Kennedy for not giving them an updated
estimate of the obviously growing, budget deficit for fiscal 1971. D -aly
Chairman Wilbur Mills (D-Ark) did not comment on the proposed A FATHER guides his son to the first day of class
lead levy, but some other members of the tax-writing committee told OdnEeetr coli hcg.Shost
Kennedy they dislike the use of a tax bill to discourage the addition Ogdnr Elementarlby olwniago aSchoos tsh
of air-polluting lead to high-octane gasolines, cutywrmakdbwiepadbsnesm s
Kennedy said that the proposal is both a revenue and an anti- nrcur-rredsgrgtnpas-
polution measure. DE SEGREGATION RESULT?
I6Ind hrc I $10.50 per month
- E EWE WE W MC~N DEPOSIT H i h a s n e t

'.Railroad

strike

i
4
V

postpon ed five
days, for talks
WASHINGTON (P) - A nationwide railroad strike scheduled for
midnight last night was postponed for five days after the govern-
ment asked four unions to keep talking in hopes of reaching a peace-
ful'wage settlement.
"The unions stated td us very firmly that this is the only ex-
tension they plan to give," Assistant Secretary of Labor W. J. Usery
said of the agreement to move the strike deadline to one minute past
midnight Monday.
Usery added that there was some progress in the four-hour ne-
gotiating' session that led to yesterday's strike postponement; but
"it is a long way from a settlement."
Chief industry negotiator John Hiltz said that granting the de-
mands for three-year wage boosts of 40 per cent or more plus cost-
of-living increases and other ben-'
efits for some 500,000 workers now
averaging $3.50 per hour would
bankrupt the nation's railroads.s t s
The strike delay was requested
after consultation among top fed-
eral agencies, including the White
House. I, new
At the White House, tsery call-

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hisMoiescol
MOBILE, Ala. UP) - Mobile County's public school system, the
state's largest, opened under a new desegregation plan yesterday with
indications that many parents were holding their children out of
school or takings them to schools of their choice.
A newsman estimated that only about 150 white pupils showed
up at formerly all-black Blount High in nearby Prichard. School of-
ficials had said about 1,000 white pupils and 1,679 blacks had been
assigned to the school under federalcourt orders.
Fewer than 20 white pupils were seen reporting for enrollment
at formerly all-black Central High School, now a middle grade school.

ed for. "hard bargaining" during
the postponement to avoid inter-
vention by President Nixon or
Congress in the dispute involving
railroad clerks, trainmen, track
maintenances workers and dining
car employes.
Nixon still has authority to de-
lay any strike in the dispute for
60 days by appointing an emer-
gency board under the Railway
Labor Act, but Usery said, "The
government ,f e e 1s- an emergency
board is not the answer to good,
hard collective bargaining."
In the two previous nationwide
rail strike threats, Nixon named
emergency boards in both cases.
Congress ,finally imposed a wage
settlement for shop men in one
dispute and negotiations are still
continuing in the other dispute
over elimination of firemen's jobs.

I

The last time
Virgil Tibbs
had aday
like this
was
f °"In The
Heat
Of The
Night"

O
THE MIKE S o
Vx;awb St.
"-,sad'. 11-6
J

I

II _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____.. __ _ -----___ _.__. a

About 340 white pupils and 1,238 b
Fewer than 100 whites of the7
High School, formgerly all-black, s
.enrollment. The school has aboutO
800 black pupils.
Reporters counted between 250
and 300 parents and pupils in the
Vigor High School auditorium,
where nonconformers were sent
when they attempted to register
their children despite assignment
elsewhere.
Although no official figures
were available, widespread absen-
teeism was reported.
However, many parents normal-,
ly do not register their children
on the first d a y, preferring to
bring them in after the opening-
day jam.
The school situation here was
further complicated last weekend
when the Congress of Racial
Equality (CORE) endorsed a de-
segregation plan that would cre-
ate two separate school districts,
one black and one white, and that
would, in - effect, resegregate the
school system.
CORE plans to offer its plan
to the U.S. Supreme Court when
it hears a final appeal of the Mo-
bile case next month, along with
five other significant desegrega-
tion appeals.
KFT/NA
4 " AD

Poiee, Indians clash
over fishing dispute

AUDITION NQW!

TACOMA, Wash. 'OP)-Gunshot'
fire b r o k e out yesterday as a
group of Tacoma policemen and
other law enforcement personnel
closed in on Indians along the
Puyallup River h e r e in. an at-
tempt to clear it of fishing nets -
the legality of which is in dispute.
Police said 60 persons, five of
them juveniles, were arrested.
About 15 policemen on foot.
moved toward the Indian group-
which an Indian spokesman ear-
lier said totaled about 100 per-
sons - after using a bullhorn to
tell the Indians to lay down their
arms.

blacks were assigned there.
725 assigned to Washington Junior
howed up during the first hour of

vote lw*
WASHINGTON (A') - Seven
states yesterday.told the Supreme
Court that Congress acted ,uncon-
stitutionally in deciding that 18-
year-olds may vote.
The states argued, through In-
diana' Atty. Gen. Theodore Sen-
dak, that their power to set the
minimum voting age at 21 can be
overridden only by an amendment
to the Constitution.
Thus, th e states - Indiana,
Idaho, Louisiana, Ohio, Utah,
West Virginia, and Wyoming -
joined a suit brought in the high
court by Oregon and Texas, to ov-
erturn the 18-year-old provision
of the 1970 Federal Voting R ights
law.
The court is scheduled to hear
arguments on the suit Oct. 19. A
separate suit brought by a group
of New Yorkers attacking the law
will be argued today in U.S. Dis-
trict Court here.
Sendak's brief' f o r the seven
states contended that three pro-
visions of the Constitution give
the states the authority to set vot-
ing qualifications. The Indiana of-
ficial quoted James Madison's
Federalist Papers tQ support his
yersion of the framers' intention.
Backers of the 1970 law base
Congress' authority primarily on
Section 5 of the 14th Amendment.
Sendal4 argued they are wrong.
The amendment, ratified in
1868, was designed to protect the
rights of former slaves against
violations by 1 the states. Section
5 gives Congress power to enact
"appropriate legislation."
Sendak contended that' states
do not violate anyone's rights by
establishing a minimum voting
age. Consequently, lhe said, Sec-
tion 5 does not giye Congress the
power to set the voting age at 18.
Forty-six of the 50 states re-
quire voters to be at least 21 years
old. The exceptions are Hawaii,
which gives the vote tp 20-year-
olds; Alaska and Kentucky, with
a 19-year minimum; and Georgia
which set 18 as the-minimum.
Sendak said the 46 states hav-
ing a 21-year old minimum are not
acting unreasopably. The general
common law rule, is that an in-
dividual does not have mature
judgment until that age.

who gathered some distance from
'the railway bridge.
The fisheries personnel were in-
volved in an "enforcement ac-
tion," Assistant -Fisheries Director
J. E. Lasater s a i d in Olympia.
They were to seize any unlawful
fish nets or gear at the river and
to arrest anyone fishing.
The dispute, a long-ranging
controversy, centers on Indian
claims that they are entitled to
commercial fishing rights on the-
Puyallup. Yesterday's i n c i d e n t
stemmed from the, Indians insist-
ing they still were due 32 hours of
fishing under a special permit is-
sued ,by the fisheries department.
The department said the permit
expired Tuesday evening.

HE MIRISCH PROOUCTION COMPANY presents
SIDNEY POITIER MARTIN LANDAU)
A WALTER MIRISCH PRODUCTION
"THEY CLLME MISTER TIDES!
U Ste
BARBARA McNAIRe .atee'ANTHONY ZERBE
Screenplayby ALAN R.TRUSTMANand JAMES R. WEBB Stmt' by ALAN R.TRUSTMAN
/asedm the characreatedbyJOHN BALL Music-QUINCY JONES EecutxePrducerWALTER MIRISCH
PreducedbyHERBERT HIRSCHMAN Directed byGORDON DOUGLAS COLORbyDetue ' GP
NIC1NAL MOON ICTSCOerOUINo WES AAMLUDONnl ns UITEDOCMS ruAts

V of MH ARTS CHORALE
Tues. and Thurs.-3:00-4:30 P.M.
Angell Hall-Auditorium C

MAYNARD KLEI N-Director

I

FRIDAY at the MICHIGAN

S _

;!III
a
_,
',I.

j

Observers said four shots ap-
parently came from the area oc- Earlier yesterday,
cupied by the Indians, a Burling- Bridges, speaking for
ton Northern Railroad bridge be- group, said: "We are
tween Interstate 5 and old U.S. are armed and prepg
99. Indians had armed guards at fend our rights witho
each end of their encampment be- As a fisheries b
tween that bridge and another on across the river tos
U.S. 99. Police responded with tear with which Indians w
gas. Indians on the bridg
A police-, spokesnan said h iss p
men were brought in to provide shots, police said, and
protection for Washington De- men released tear gas
partment of Fisheries personnel for the Indians.

Maiselle
the Indian
fishing. We
ared to de-
our lives."
oat moved
seize a net
were fishing,
e fired four
the police-
and headed

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