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January 16, 1971 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-16

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Saturday, January 16, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BiYl i wk;

- - -

roge Seven

k.

I

R oving Bagnell leads

Swimmers tame

Icer turnabout,

5-1

By RICK CORNFELD
Little Karl Bagnell, at 5-6 and
150 pounds the smallest man on
the ice, turned away 38 North Da-
kota shots last night and cam
within one slap of recording a
shut out as the Wolverine icers
humbled North Dakota, 5-1.
Michigan's defense, which had
been faltering in the past few
weeks. kept the Sioux from seri-
ous'y threatening until the Wol-
yerines had opened a two goal
lead.
Coach Al Renfrew said. "When{
you get the wings coming back or
defense it helps. and we did. But
they did have a lot of open shots.
We just had the goal tending."
North Dakota paraded the high-
est scoring offense in the Western
Collegiate Hockey Association be-
fore the Coliseum crowd of 2400
but Bagnell stopped it cold.
The victory, combined with Min-
nesota's 6-2 loss to Michigan Tech,
gives the Wolverines a tie for
eighth in the Conference.
As an example of his goal tend-
ing acrobatics, Bagnell robbed{
Nopak hot shots Bob Duncan and
Greg Cameron twice apiece. Near
the start of the second period
Duncan took a pass five feet int
front of the Wolverine net and3
shot point blank, but Bagnell
cooly took the shot on his pads.
Just before the period ended,c
Bagnell stole a goal from Duncan
again. Jlust outside the crease,
Duncan took a turn-aroundback-
handed shot, but Bagnell wasn'tl
fooled.

dlaily
sports,
NIGHT EDITOR:
JERRY CLARKE
Twelve minutes earlier, Camer-
on, who along with Duncan is tied
for fourth in the league in scor-
ing, had let fly a hard slap shot
like a bullet from the blue line.
Bagnell got his stick up just in
time to deflect the puck into The
stands.
Then in the final period, Cam-
eron grabbed a loose puck sliding
to the right in front of the net
and tried to shove it in but Bag-
nell did what was now becoming
routine. Though on the right mde
of the goal, he flashed to his left
to meet what must have been a
surprised and disappointed Cam-
eron.
Only a 25-feet second period
slap shot by Brian DePiero on
which the goalie was screened by
teammate Mike Jarry, kept Bag-
nell from recording the second
shutout of his career.
Bagnell's brilliance oversha-
dowed all else, but the revised
Wolverine offense was hardly
asleep. Captain Paul Gamsby's
line, which this week had Merle
Falk added to it, produced four
goals.
numbed

Brian Slack scored two of those
goals. One, a power play effort
near the end of the second period,
was unassisted. Slack took the
puck near the left point, and
skated around a couple of strug-
gling NoDaks until he was 10 feet
in front of the right goal post
where he shot it past the helpless
goalie.
His other goal was a result of
a two-on-one breakaway. Gams-
by took the puck when the second
period was just seconds old and
skated down the center of the ice.
Inside the NoDak zone he hit
Slack on his left with a perfect
pass.
Slack took the puck on the fly,
and a lightning fast wrist shot.'
from the top of the circle beat <j
goalie Jim Nelson.
Gamsby himself notched Michi-
gan's final tally four minutes into
the third stanza. Waiting by the
left post of the Sioux goal, Gams-
by took a pass from Slack and
easily shot it in.,
Though the Wolverines had
dominated the early minutes of
the game, they were unable to
score until seven minutes had
gone by. A Punch Cartier slap shot
deflected by Falk broke the ice for
Michigan. _--
Less than two minutes later,
Rick Mallette stole the puck at
center ice and skated all alone to
where goalie Nelson had come out
to meet him in front of the net. I
Although Nelson attempted to
cut down the angle on Mallett2's
shot, the sophomore winger shot it
past the goalie's right side.

Gophen
By RANDY PHILLIPS
The Wolverine Tankers knocked
off a weak Minnesota squad last
night 77-46 in a somtwhat lack-
luster performance.
Michigan spurted to a quick
lead by posting an extremely fast
3:32.41 in the 400 Medley Relay.
Chris Hansen opened up a large
lead in the backstroke leg while
butterflyer Byron MacDonald in-
creased that margin to nearly aI
pool length. The Wolverine four-
some's time was the best mark in
the nation so far this season,
Wolverine coach Gus Stager re-
marked that although the time
for the relay event was fast, "each
(swimmer) could go faster; andj
I'm satisfied that it is going well."
Although Stager was satisfied
with the relay event he voiced dis-
appointment with the overall per-
formance of his squad. He placed

the brunt of the1
trip last week"
Big Ten Relays

77-46

blame on "A bad
referring to the
where Michigan

-Daily-Denny Gainer
Karl Bagnall stops NoDak attack
SECOND ROUND
Patterson knocks out Forte

By The Associated Press

t'

' A ACTT TIT; w ![TT -- ___ i

NoDaksr

Near the end of that period, t
Sioux thought they had con

Score by periods: 5. ND - Miller (2, hooking) 3:31; within a point, but the refere
N. Dakota 0 1 0 - 1 6.' M - Desmarais (2, roughing) argued that a hard NoDak sh
Michigan 2 2 1 -- 5 8:22; 7. M -- Jarry (2, elbowing) did not make it into the goal.
FIRST PERIOD. SCORING: 1. M - 14:20; 8. ND - Henry (2, interfer-
Falk (Gamsby, Cartier) 7:00 (PP); 2. ence) 18:15. Though the Sioux argued v#
M - Mallette (Un.) 8:43 (SH). THIRD PERIOD. SCORING: 6. M - hemently, one referee said, "T]
PENALTIES: 1. M - Marra (2, high Gamsby (Slack, Jarry) 4:18. Penal- shot hit the top bar, bounce
sticking) :54; 2. ND - Henry (2, ties: 9. ND -- Miller (2, slashing) d
high sticking) :54; 3. ND - Henry 2:55; 10. M - Cartier (2, roughing) down and missed the line a
(2, hooking) 6:23; 4. M -- Jarry 1:01; 11. ND - Wilson (2, rough- then rolled out.
(2, interference) 7:58. ing) 4:01; 12. M - Gagnon (2, The Wolverines had been hu
SECOND PERIOD. SCORING: 3. M slashing) 14:20. in the past by penalties, but la
- Slack (Gamsby) 0:22; 4. ND - Saves: nithe yweealtid b
DePiero (Bragnalo) 13:32; 5. M - Michigan (Bagnell) 12 14 12-38 night they were able to avoid b
Slack (Un.) 18:51 (PP). Penalties: N. Dakota (Nelson) 14 5 18-37 ing called on needless infraction
Celtics smash Atlanta 134-123;
Philly holds off Bull charge

MIAMI BEACH - Former
me heavyweight champion Floyd Pat-
terson buried Levi Forte under a
es barrage of punches last n i g 4 t
ot twice sending him through t h e

rt
st
)e-
ns.

ropes before scoring a second
round knockout.
A Miami Beach Convention Hall
crowd of 6,000 cheered wildly as
the two-time world king decked
Forte twice before finally ending
the mismatch.
Forte was counted out at 2:20
of the round.
Patterson, now 36 years old and
claiming "I still hope for another
title shot," smashed Forte with a
left jab at the close of the first
round and the Miami unknown
staggered against a corner post at
Ethe bell.
Patterson, weighing 192, d e -
livered a strong left that sent
Forte down for a count of seven
early in the second round. Forte,
who said before the fight t h a t
"Patterson is my hero - a man
I would like to copy," remained
game but was solidly beaten when
he bounced up from both knock-
downs.
Patterson sent the 199-pounder
through the ropes for a count of
eight midway through the second
round before finally sprawling
Forte across the ropes for the full
count.
"I will fight Oscar -Bonavena in
New York next month," said thej
happy Patterson, "I have never

[
i
l
r
G
f
ff
# .
(.
t E

lost in Madison Square Garden
and don't plan to lose."
If Patterson gets by the tough
Argentine heavyweight, a 15th
round knockout victim of Mu-
hammad Ali last month, the aging
former king hopes to meet the
victor of the Ali-Frazer bout. I
"I will quit when I think I'm
not a championship calibre fight-
er," Patterson said. "And I'm not
ready to quit just yet. I feel
fine. -
In -other boxing action 1 a s t
night sports entrepeneur Jack
Kent Cooke - with Muhammad
Ali beaming in approval at h is
fBaby Blue bounced

side - estimated that A 1i 's
March 8 fight in New York with
Joe Frazier for the world heavy-
weight boxing title will gross in
the neighborhood of $35 million.
But Cooke hastened to a d d,
"There is a vast difference in the
gross and the net."
The same applies to the $2.5
million each he and his partner in
the worldwide closed circuit
screening of the fight, young Jerry
Perenchio, have guaranteed to All
and Frazier. He referred primar-
ily to taxes of the frighters' purs-
es.
At a news conference in the
spacious lounge at the Forum, the
entertainment palace Cooke built,
All was asked about complaints by
Roy Innes, national director of
the Congress of Racial Equality,
that no black groups are being giv-
en a chance to promote or benefit
from proceeds of the closed-cir-
cuit screening of the fight.
Ali's main reason for being here
was to attend a dinner Friday#
night sponsored by the' Los An-
geles Brotherhood Crusade at
which he was the guest of honor.'
Proceeds go to needy black causes.

failed to perform up to expecta-
tions. As a result of the poor
showing Stager rested some of his
top performers or used them in
only one event.
Only two other events impressed
the Michigan mentor. Rich Dorney
bettered his brother's best time
in the 200 yard backstroke with a
2:01.32 clocking - a time which
rates among the tops in the coun-
try this season. Rich's brother has
since transfered to Minnesota.
Dorney was swimming without
the aid of Wolverine ace back-
strokers Chris Hansen and Steve,
McCarthy.
The breaststroke, another strong
event for Michigan was swept by
Bill Mahoney and Mike Whitaker'
in one of four that went one-two
for the Wolverines. Stager held
out Freshman sensation Stu Isaac
who has one of the top times in
the country at this stage of the
season.
In the 200 yard Butterfly three
Wolverines easily outdistanced all
three Gophers as Bob Gavin took
an early lead and kept it. The fly
is Michigan's deepest event as
three swimmers rate times in the
top ten in the nation.
Michigan camne away with one
good performances and one aver-
iage one in the diving events. Div-
10% off
EVERYTHING
NOW at NOW
Student Book Service

ing coach Dick Kimball was very
pleased with the work of sopho-
more Joe Crawford on the o n e
meeter board as he outdid Miln-
nesota ace Craig Lincoln in a very
tight contest. Lincoln placed se-
cond last year in the Big Ten be-
hind only Indiana great J i m
Henry. Crawford's dives were not
spectacular but were consistent.
Kimball evaluated Dick Rydze's
second place showing on the high
board as fair "He had five good
dives. but missed one and you
can't do that." Michigan's ace an
Sthe boards would have had a dif-
ficult time nosing out Lincoln
with six good plunges as the 1970
Big Ten three meter champ had
two outstanding dives, racking up
totals of over 64 points in both.
Last night's diving performances
were a big improvement over
Michigan's poor display last week
in the Big Ten Relays, but Kim-
ball attributed much of this im-
provement to the home pool ad-
vantage.
Goosing
the Gophers
1000-YARD FREESTYLE: 1. Fish-
burn (M); 2. Bryk (M); 3. Tie be-
tween Murray (M) and KHronstedt
(Minn.). Time - 10:27.19.
ONE METER DIVING: 1. Craw-
ford (M); 2. Lincoln (Minn); 3.
Iamilton (M). Points - 280.00.
400 YARD MEDLEY RELAY: 1.
Michigan (HansenYIsaac, MacDon-
aid, McCullough); 2. Minnesota.
Time - 3:32.41.
200 YARD FREESTYLE: 1. Jordan
(Minn.); 2. R.. Peterson (Minn.); 3.
Fairman (M). Time - 1:52.1.
50 YARD FREESTYLE: 1. Sand-
hick (Minn.); 2. Katz (M); Zann
(31). Time - 22.47.
200 YARD INDIVIDUAL MED-
LEY: 1. Norlen (M); 2. Hodgson
(1inn); 3. Hiller (M). Time -
2:02.87.
THREE METER DIVING: 1. Lin-
coln (Minn); 2. Rydze (M); 3.
Schenthal (M). Points - 307.25.
200 YARD BUTTERFLY: 1. Gavin
(M); 2. D. Peterson (M); 3. Stone
(Minn). Time - 1:57.8.
100 YARD FREESTYLE: 1. Pet-
erson (Minn); Watts (M); 3. Miller
(Minn). Time - 50.6.
200 YARD BACKSTROKE: 1. Dor-
fney (M); 2. Goshorn (M); 3. Hodg-
son (Minn). Time - 2:01.32.
500 YARD FREESTYLE: 1. Norlen
(M); 2. Jordan (Minn); 3. Bryk (M).
Time - 5:02.66.
COME TO
TOWN and COUNTRY
RESTAURANT
Fine: Food
Chops, Steaks, &' Shrimp
Soul Food Home Cooked
Open Pit Barbeque
-Open-
6 a.m. till 9 p.m.-Mon.-Thurs.
6 a.m.'till 3 a.m:-Fri.-Sot.
8 a.m. till 7:30 p.m.-Sunday
730 NORTH MAIN
Delivery and Catering
769-2330

By The Associated Press five minutes before going on toI
BOSTON - John Havlicek, Jo defeat the Chicago Bulls 99-96
Jo White and rookie Dave Cow- last night in a National Basket-
ens combined for 78 points last| ball Association game.
night in leading the Boston Celtics The 76ers led 87-79 with 5:39
to a 134-123 National Basketball remaining in the fourth period
Association victory over the At- and appeared to have an easy vic-
lanta Hawks. tory. The Bulls however, rally-
Havlicek, chasing Milwaukee's ing behind the scoring of Tom
Lew Alcindor for the league scor- Boerwinkle and Chet Walker, cut
ing lead, hit for 27 points, 16 in the margin to 93-92 with 2:37 to
the third quarter. White hit for go.
26 and Cowens for 25 as the Cel- * *
tics defeated the Hawks for the Pistons escape
third time in four meetings.
Boston set up a tight defense NEW YORK-Jimmy Walker's
which forced Atlanta into 19 turn-
overs in the first three periods as
the Celtics took a 106-85 lead.
Rookie Pete Maravich scored 351
points for the Hawks and Lou
Hudson 25.
* * *
76'ers win
PHILADELPHIA - The Phila-
delphia 76ers blew all but one
point of a 13-point lead in the last

120-foot jump shot with 18 seconds
left, the only Detroit field goal of
the overtime period, lifted the1
Pistons to a 99-97 National Bas-
ketball Association victory over
the Buffalo Braves last night.
Walker had tied the nip-and-
tuck thriller at 95 with a foul shot
at the 1:37 mark of the extra
period. Then Cornell Warner put
Buffalo ahead by two with a pair
of free throws and Detroit's Bob
Lanier tied it again with two foul
shots, setting the stage for Walk-
er's game-winner.

wrestling team was defeated by
Grand Rapids Junior College
last night by a score of 19-14.
The match was tied going into
the heavyweight class, where
Grand Rapids' P e t e r Lee
pinned Gary Ernst in the first
period.
The high point of the meet
for the Wolverines was at 150
pounds, where Jeff Bousley
easily defeated Howard Hobson,
winning by a score of 19-6.
Hobson, a two time state cham-
pion in high school, had been
a highly sought after prospect
before enrolling at G r a n d
Rapids.

N \, * N.0.N
a ~NA~i*Z>,
~ K' ' ' ~ .' K KN
«w-'"' ,
:.. N. : ..

WORSHIP

K Pro Standings

f5 .::

I

NBA
Eastern Conference
Atlantic Division
W L Pct.
New York 32 15 .681
Boston 27 19 .587
Philadelphia 28 21 .571
Buffalo 13 35 .265
Central Division
Baltimore 26 18 .591
Cincinnati 19 25 .432
Atlanta 14 33 .298
Cleveland 6 45 .118
Western Conference
Midwest Division
Milwaukee 36 7 .865
Detroit 32 16 .667
~.Chicago 27 19 .587
Phoenix 27 21 .563
Pacific Division
Los Angeles 25 19 .568
San Francisco 25 23 .521
San Diego 23 24 .489
Seattle 22 25 .468
Portland 16 32 .333
Yesterday's Results
Philadelphia 99, Chicago 96
Boston 134, Atlanta 123
Detroit 99, Buffalo 97
Milwaukee 135, Cincinnati 116

GB
4j
5
20! 4
7
13#>4
231 1
6E
11
2
334
4%
11

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washington
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Dr Hoover Rupert Minister
Bartlett Beavin. Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 a.m,--Mission Panel.
I1:00 a.m.-Sermon by Rev. Fred B. Mait-
land: "What Are YOU Doing Here?"
Broadcast WNRZ 103 fm, WNRS 1290 am,
I1:00 and 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, Jan. 17:
5:30 p.m.-Celebration, Wesley Lounge.
6:15 p m.-Supper, Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.-Program: Consumer education,
re: ecology, Wesley Lounge.
j Thursday. Jan. 21:
12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.-Luncheon Discus-
sion: "Different Strokes for Churchy Folks"
with Ed McCracken, Pine Room.
Friday, Jan, 22:
12:00 noon to 1:00 p.m.-Luncheon Discus-
sion: "Historic Church" with Bart Beavin,
Pine Room.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema
10:00 a.m.-Morning Worship: "Pictures of
Christians."
6:00 p.m.-Evening celebration.
7:15 p.m.-"Reflections on Monastic Life."
Discussion led by Mr. Frank Culley, from
the Ecumenical Campus Center.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Camous-
Corner State and William Sts.
Rev. Terry N. Smith, Senior Minister
Rev. Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Worship Services at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-
"A Sigh Is Not an Empty Thing," Rev.
Terry N. Smith.

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a m-Worship Services, Sunday
(2-20 years).

School

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr.,
Worship Services at 9:00 and
Church School at 9:00 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN+
1432 Washtenaw Ave.

R. E. Simonson
S11:00 a.m.
CHURCH

WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.--Testimony Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon, 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You," Radio WAAM,
1600, Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc., phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.--Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.

For the student body:
Genuine
Authentic
Navy
PEA COATS

1

Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m. Sermon by
Mr. Sanders.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
1 1 :00 a.m. - Communion. Bring your lunch
afterwards to talk about BEDL-WRO.

Just as a progression of shape transforms itself from the common to the
different so does the MICHIGANENSIAN. Buy the 1971 Yearbook and
discover how it has surpassed the ordinary to be completely unique.
. NOW is the time to buy your
MICHIGANENSIAN
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Just return this.coupon with $7.00 (check or money order payable to the
' MICHIGANENSIAN) to the Student Publications Building, 420 May-
nard. A receipt will be sent within 3 weeks after your order is received.
* NAMFL

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
110 a fO ,m .-Su nrnav Servie wbi ngar he, kld

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Worship
Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran

LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL

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