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April 17, 1971 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-17

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SatudayApri 17,197

Saturday. Aoril 17.1971

Contemporary Directions'
closes with local composers

HELP YOUR BROTHERI
Draft

I

Killer Sale

mmmmwit

I

SWhite $4ne4ca
presented by Ann Arbor Civic Theater

0

By JOE PEHRSON
The final concert of the Con-
temporary Directions Series,
presented last night in H ill
Auditorium, was a program of
generally good quality, with a
variety of works presented.
This is the same program
which will be presented in New
York city under the direction of
Sidney Hodkinson who conduct-
ed this performance.
The first work on the pro-
gram was a piece by George
*Cacioppo, "Time on Time in
Miracles." Cacioppo has a re-
cording of this piece, but this,
recorded during one of the
Once group festivals in Ann
Arbor, makes it difficult to dis-
tinguish between the verytsubtle
sounds and almost inaudible
combinations of Cacioppo's style.
Cacioppo has not w r i t t e n
much, and the attention is ap-
but on the extremely cautious
propriately not on- quantity
but on the extremely cautious
selection of each element used.
There is a general impression
that Cacioppo has placed as
much -attention of each parti-
cular as on combinations so
that the result is a piece which
may be heard in many different
ways, each producing the same

possibilities for attention a n d
quiet pleasure.
Cacioppo's use of some of the
lower register piano sounds
(clusteral) in combination with
higher sounds of les amplitude
(and a soprano solo) lends an
immediate depth that keeps
extending and extending as ele-
ments of the same character are
added.
The second piece on the pro-
gram was a work by Roberto
Gerhard. "Hymnody". Gerhard's
music is interesting, but it seems
this interest is not as immed-
iate as it might be. Gerhard
must bring back elementsin re-
petition again and again until
something that makes sense is
created. In other words, t h e
sounds produced in an immed-
iate context are not enough and
it is only when Gerhard brings
each one of these insufficient
combinations back again and
again that a sensible part of
speech is made.
Peter Griffith, a young com-
poser from Ann Arbor, has an
orchestral piece that seems to
work fairly well. At the begin-
ning, there is a sense.. that
sounds are present which are
not heard as well as they might
be. It seems, then, that some

of these are too theoretical and
not musical enough, - but a
greater familiarity with t h e
orchestra will provide Griffith
with the amount of sound ex-
perience that he needs. Near
the conclusion there is a fan-
tastic tremolo, begining in the
violin section and leading, by
its inherent nature, to a cre-
scendo. There should be more
music using eiements similar
to this one, and I was rather

disappointed that Griffith did
not use this further.
The final piece on the pro-
gram was by another young
composer from this area, and
was another orchestral piece.
This was Kurt Carpenter's "Ab-
raxas". Carpenter seems to
have a greater sense of unity
and sequence than Griffith but
the individual sounds are some-
times not as interesting.

lydia mendelssohn
8 p.m., aprilr 21-24
668-6300
box opens mon. 19th

Interview': Filming
five, men who served

I

V

By L. A. FRISCO
The Academy Award winner
in the documentary class, Inter-
view with My Lai Veterans, will
be shown tonight in Aud. A at
7 and 9. The film, one of the
most moving tales of the war in
Southeast Asia, is an inter-
view with five men who served
with Lt. William Calley. It un-
veils their rationalizations for
what happened at My Lai, and
reveals their lack of questioning
of the results.
The story it tells is of men
who do not question orders, even
if it means killing women and
children. As one of the veter-
ans explains it, "It was a search
and destroy mission. That means
search and destroy everything in
the area."
At a time when veterans and

soldiers are becoming m o r e
and more outspoken on their
criticism of the war, Inter-
view with My Lai ' Veterans
shows those who believe Calley
alone responsible for what hap-
pened at My Lai that there are
others serving in Viet Nam
who could have done the same
thing. The comment of one of
the interviewees was "it's gone
on before and it will happen
again."
Interview with My Lai Veter-
ans is a must for those who are
considering going to Washington
for the April 24 march. It is a
clarification of what has gone
wrong in Vietnam.
Each of the interviewees is
asked the best way to stop in-
cidents like the massacre at
My Lai, and every reply is
essentially "get out."

___..

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Starts

0
'cinem

"AVERY FUNNY,
VERY INTELLIGENT
VERY AFFECTING MOVIE!"'
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. TIMES
"A MAD, MAD MOVIE. DEVASTATINGLY
FUNNY. AND COMICALLY DEVASTATING"
-JUDITH CRIST.NBC-TV

7

Cody, Pork at Hill

1-

By FRED ROBINSON
Tonight marks the return to
Ann Arbor of one of its favorite
groups as Commander Cody and
the Lbst Planet Airmen return
to Hill Auditorium.
On the program with Cody is
Pork, a multi-media electronic
music group which has been giv-
ing concerts m Ann Arbor and
the Midwest. The group was
founded in 1970 by three com-
posers, Robert fBoury, Kurt Car-
penter and Russel Peck.
PORK's program will consist
of five new pieces combining a
variety of media. The first piece,
Florescent Wax Lips, by the West
Coast composer Lloyd Rodgers, is
a monolithic electronic extrava-
ganza featuring the Ann Arbor
Mime Troupe, directed by Greg
Jarboe. Through a series of en-
gagements in Detroit and Ann
Arbor, the Troupe has perfected
a unique integration of music and
theatre.
The Cats Meow, by Russell
Peck, is the Detroit Sound at
supersonic speed. Overwhelming-
ly amplified, the'work challenges
the blistering four-hand finger

technique of pianists Peck and
Carpenter.
Bo Bo Bolinski, R. Crumb's No.
1 Human Zero, makes his trans-
figured silver screen debut in
David Andrew's Crosscountry.
At the climax of the piece, the
Ann Arbor Mime Troupe ex-
plodes into a game of unmusical
chairs.
HONK, by Robert Boury, was
composed in memory of Jimi
Hendrix. Boury's manic pop
piano phantasy provides the ba-
sis for the color kinescope pro-
duced in collaboration with Rob-
ert Whitney and Reynold Lowe.
Kurt Carpenter's Lone Wolf
transforms the auditorium ipto an
electric chamber of gothic hor-
rors. The work employs a full
range of electronic techniques
a n d manipulation, including
Moog equipment and sonic mod-
ulation inspired by the sound of
the full moon.
PORK's presentation marks the
initial thrust of a unique experi-
ment in offering rock audiences
unusual, sophisticated multi-
media productions.

A-

20th Century-Fmx presents
AcmEL~nIT O l AN mMARN J.U'LLSFEFFER'S L E
w~rcU MRQA ROOD ft w,", W$CNT GARDENIA EUZO&TH N Jlt 0KOKES
bw~s M ALAN ARKt rIN 'M JNKBROOSKY csw~qs,1ULES FEIFFER MUnECOOB esernxodiouoacn

K

WITH MAX SHULMAN
(Br Woa Sxor of Rally Round the Flag, Boys... Do*Gilis...et-.)

CREST

PRELTRAL
CONCENTRATE

The Preening of America

X-Ige 5

oz.

Fi

An Original Musical by Jerry Bilik
THE BRASS & GRASS,
FORE VER
AT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE!
MAY 5-8 and 12-15
TICKET PRICES: Wed. and Thurs.-$2 and $3
Fri. and Sat.-$2.50 and $3.50

l

Recent polls taken on American campuses by Time and News-
week have revealed unexpected, and most welcome, results. Both mag-
azines found that today's undergraduates, far from boiling with revo-
lutionary fervor, are just as torpid as everyone else.
Joyous tidings, of course, but I must say that I was never worried.
Sure, life-styles are a little different on campus these days; neverthe-
less, I've always felt that down deep this generation clings to the same
solid values that sustained all their predecessors.
In my own college days, for example, the most popular aid to socia-
bility on campus was precisely what it is today: Miller High Life Beer.
And, mind you, my college days were a good long time ago. I got my
B.A. way back in 1908. (My alma mater, incidentally, was a school
I'm sure you all know-the Wyoming College of Belles Lettres and
Commercial Baking, from whence, as you are undoubtedly aware,
came a veritable host of graduates who later achieved stardom in the
breadstuffs game-men like Darrell J. Inskip who invented rye bread
with caraway seeds; Irving T. Whitsun who invented the toothpick,
thus making it possible to eat rye bread with caraway seeds; Sol Bagel
who invented the permanent doughnut which bears his name; and
many, many others. Indeed, the list would be far longer if the college
had stayed in business but, alas, it was killed by mold in 1921.)
But I digress. Even in 1908, I say, Miller High Life was a campus
favorite. In fact, it was popular even before 1908, for Miller has been
delivering flavor to discriminating Americans for over 115 years! And
today it is more widely appreciated than ever! And why wouldn't it
be? In 115 years no other brewer has ever duplicated Miller's flavor.
Oh, they've tried to copy Miller, you can bet, but a fat lot of good it
did them. Since the very beginning Miller's superb brewing formula
has been one of the best kept secrets on earth. It has never been known
to more than one man-Miller's chief brewmaster-and he has always
been kept inside a hollow mountain in downtown Milwaukee.
But I digress. The polls, I say, have proved that today's college
student, though he dresses in a homespun robe and wears chicken
bones in his ears, cherishes the same dreams and drives that students
have always held dear.

NOW

NOW

reg.
69c

Lge. 3 oz.
Reg. 89c

C

IC

ammmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmwwwwmwwwmwmmmwmwwmwwwwmwwwmwwmwmmwwmmmwwmwmwsmwmw

I

I

LIQUID
PRELL*

V

SCOPE

I

NOW

NOW

Send checks and self-addressed envelope to Ann
Arbor Civic Theater, P.O. Box 1993, Ann Arbor
48106. Or call 662-7282.
HEY KIDS!
COMMANDER CODY
AND HIS LOST PLANET AIRMEN
ARE READY TO DO IT AGAIN.
(with cactus props and dump trucks)
Saturday night-8:30 P.M.-HiII Aud.
-PLUS-
PORK
a new multi-media classic
-A N D-
SUMMER-ANN ARBOR 1970
a 20 min. documentary on the
Blues Festival and Sunday Concerts

7 oz.
reg. 99c

9c

17 oz.
family size
reg. $1.19

IC,

"mu-m--mmmmmmm m---m--mm--mm---m-mm--- mmmmmmm-mmmmmmmmmmm m-mmmmm mmmmmm m-m. -m

4
*

Carters Yellow
Hi liters
29c

Bic Pens
loc

. Xerox copies
(we do offset too)
4c

Canvas
6 ydsx53"
unprimed
Cotton Duck

$5.95

mm- - -- --- - - - -- - - - - - - - ---- - -- - --mm m. mmmum mm m- -.-m- -"-m-r.:r- --m- -"-- - - ---"mmmmm.mummmmmmmmmmI

To illustrate, I recently visited a student commune at a prominent
Southern university (Michigan State). Now, I'll admit it didn't look
much like one of your old-fashioned fraternity or sorority houses. First
of all, there was no house. Everyone slept in trees, except for one girl
who made a hammock out of a discarded bra. In the second place,
meals were not served; they were trapped. And in the third place, the
kids didn't talk about the usual things like life, sex, truth and beauty.
In fact, they didn't talk. They just sang "Om," holding the note till
they hyperventilated and toppled over in a faint.
But appearances are only appearances, as I discovered when I
started to interview these people.
"What are you studying?" I asked one young man.
"My navel," he said, and I was vastly reassured, for we all know
the crying need for new doctors.
"What do you want to be when you finish school?" I asked
another young man.
"A druid," he said, and again I was reassured, for as anyone on
Wall Street can tell you, forest ecology is the coming thing.
"Do you believe in women's liberation?" I asked a girl.
"No," was the answer.
"Why not?" I asked.

I

Waterbed s
KING-SIZE
$25.00

U
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Summer rentals
TV, stereo,
refrigerator
starting
May1

POSTERS
15% off
list price

Eatons Bond
Corrasable
99c

mm mm. mm mm mmu mm mm ................................... ...................................

CHEAP
RECORD
SALE

i
YARN SALE
(We have knitting, cro-;
u cheting, macrame books
: too)1

BOOK SALE
(all paper, some
hardcover)

E
I
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i
s

KITES and
FRISBEES
all sizes and
styles

m-m--m-m-------------m-mmm----..mm--m-mmmmm------m-mm-m---------m-mm--------.-----------

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