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April 16, 1971 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, April 16, 1971

Anti-war groups prepare for
spring offensive in Washington

War tax resisters give Ecology units

1b.

(Continued from Page 1)
the anti-war movement there are
significant tactical differences.
Though the Peoples Coalition is
co-sponsoring the NPAC March on
Washington, NPAG is having lit-
tle to do with the Coalition's May
scenario. "We just don't think
you can effectively mobilize thous-
ands of people around sustained
civil disobedience," says an NPAC
spokesman.
NPAC sees its demonstration as
appealing to a broad cross-section
of the American people, from
those who are militantly opposed
to the war to those that have
never even protested it before.
Organizers of the April 24
March predict it will be at least
as large as the Nov. 15 March of
1969. "There has been talk of
attendance reaching one million,"
says one spokesman.
Current plans call for the march

to assemble on the Ellipse and
then proceed up Pennsylvania Ave-
nue to the Capitol, where a mass
rally is scheduled.
Vice President Spiro T. Agnew,
acting as president of the Senate,
granted permission yesterday to
the National Peace Action Coali-
tion for the Capitol-grounds anti-
war rally.
Agnew noted the group's assur-
ances it would provide over 2,0001
marshals trained to handle the ex-
pected crowd at the April 24 dem-
onstration.
The People's Lobby will begin on
Monday, April 26 with protesters
picketing Congress. On Tuesday
they will be at Selective Service,
on Wednesday the Internal Reve-
nue Service, on Thursday at the
Department of Health Education
and Welfare, (HEW) and on Fri-
day at the Department of Justice.
Lobbying consists of leafletting

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and talking to federal employes in
an attempt to convince them to sup-
port the May Day demonstrations
and sign the Peace Treaty.
On May 3 the People's Coalition
plans a massive disruptive demon-
stration at the Pentagon. On May
4 they plan a similar protest at the
Department of Justice,.
The May Day Tribe during May
3 and 4 aims to completely shut
down the Federal government. Va-
rious regional groups will concen-
trate on between 18 and 20 targets
which they have already chosen.
The targets include bridges, major
highways and government build-
ings.
Tactics will center around pre-
venting the movement of traffic
and preventing people from enter-
ing buildings by surrounding them.
There are about 25 regional groups
which May Day organizers char-
acterize as "very well organized."
On May 5 all the demonstrators
will surround the Capitol to de-
mand that Congress ratify the
peace treaty.
No one 'is really certain how
large a turnout to expect for the
May Day demonstrations, aowever
estimates range between 50,000 and
100,000.
Organizers are quick to point out
that May Day is not the typical
"mass march" type action, and
that there are many people who
are not prepared to engage in civil
disobedience. However, they are
certain they will have enough peo-'
ple to shut down significant por-
tions of the federal government.
Mass arrests are expected, but
the federal policy in the past has
been to charge demonstrators with
disorderly conduct and release
them after a night in jail and pay-
ment of a $10 fine.

cUI

state battle over

According to AATWC, $3676.00
withheld by local tax residents
had been donated to various
groups or placed in escrow be-
fore yesterday's demonstration.
In total, $266.00 was given by 19
individuals to 14 groups yesterday.
The community groups which re-
ceived the money, included the
Summit Street Medical Center, the
Interfaith Council for Peace, and
the Black Economic League-Wel-
fare Rights Organization (BEDL-
WRO). Some money was also given
to AAWTC to be sent to national
organizations such as the People's
Coalition for Peace and Justice, the
Harrisburg Six Defense Fund, and
the American Civil Liberties Union.
Barbara Fuller, director of In-
terfaith Peace Council, after ac-
cepting the contributions of the tax
resisters on behalf of the Council
said, "We feel this is a significant
way to let the government know
Fri. & Sun., Apr. 16 & 18
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money to local groups'
(Continued from Page 1) we won't buy the war anymore."
income tax in opposition to the Hank Bryant, vice president of
war in Indochina, others had tak- BEDL-WRO accepted a contribu-
en the more moderate step of tion for his organization and said
failing to pay the federal tax that "the destruction of racism, capital-
is part of their phone bills. ism and imperialism is necessary

- I

budget starts again

to bring peace to America."
An elderly man participating in
the demonstration explained that
he was too old to withhold his
taxes because of the possible con-
flict with the government. But he
said he came to the demonstra-
tion because he wanted to show his
opposition to the war. "The leaders
of the country are acting like
brutes," he said.

(Continued from Page 1)
from the list of member organiz-
ations the diversity of input we
already have," says Stapp.
The second objective is to pro-
vide a stronger base of support
for political action on environ-
┬░mental issues."We don't want to
undermine any individual or-
ganization studying a problem.
We just want to arrive at a point
of view and give it stronger rep-
resentation," says Stapp.
The council plans to have a num-
ber of committees studying specific
environmental problems. Primarily
concerned with local issues, espe-
cially the problem of city growth,
the organization also plans to in-
volve itself in state and national
issues.

(Continued from Page 1)
then almost inevitably participates
in several meetings with legislators
in an attempt to get more.
But this year the situation pro-
mises to be exceedingly complex in
light of the current budget crisis.
Not only are the state's proposed
budget increases for many divi-
sions especially meager, but tied to
these programs are controversial
tax changes which must first work
their way through joint House and
Senate taxation committees be-
fore allocations can be finalized.
250 attend
open forum
(Continued from Page i)
black employes when it first be-
gan operations in South Africa, but
now it has over 3,300 blacks em-
ployed, "making a good living."
Barry Bluestone, grad., a repre-
sentative of Brain Mistrust-a radi-
cal research group-countered that
GM pays its black workers a start-
ing wage of 52 cents an hour, or
$83 per month-one dollar below
the South African government's
poverty datum line for a family of
five.
Smith called the figures "mis-
leading".
Engineering Prof. Donald Cleve-
land, chairman of Senate Assem-
bly's advisory committee on fi-
nancial affairs, said the commit-
tee decided that "the use of stock-
holding voting mechanisms may
not be productive at this time." In-
stead, the committee suggested
that the University fulfill an "e'du-
cational role", by bringing together
divergent opinions on the subject,
"like we have here today."
STUDENTS:
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As a member of the American
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Besides a bill altering the meth-1
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tive next January. All proposed
state budget increases are depend-
ent on the Legislature approving
or increasing this one per cent hike.
Among a projected increase oft
$200 million in the state's budget is
a proposed $2.8 million increase fork
the University.
The State had suggested the Uni-t
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so tuition would be increased by
only seven per cent. However,
some of the suggestions, such as
decreasing enrollment by nearly
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administrators as being ineffec-
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utntil late July, say some legisla-
tors-the higher education bill con-
taining the University's appropr'ia-
tion will fall into place. After ap-
proval by the House then the Sen-
ate, the bill will go back to' the
governor for his signature-just
as the University begins formulat-
ing its budget request for the fol-
lowing year.
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