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April 16, 1971 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-16

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Friday, April 16,1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

-w . flfler. o r ...r .1tt m e

YOUR
TEXT
BOOKS
FOR
CASH
Folletts

Dropping out

of the

RC

By CARLA RAPOPORT
Students may come and students may go,
but students at the Residential College seem
to come and go a lot more than usual.
According to studies made of University
drop-out, those who leave the RC tend more
to transfer to other units or take a leave
of absence, rather than dropping out alto-
gether. LSA students, however, tend to drop
out and stay out.
One researcher attributed this tendency to
the RC teachers and staff who she says, en-
courage students to pursue their own inter-
ests and to experience new situations.
Yet a good number of those who leave RC
are happy with the switch, saying they felt
incompatible to the RC's program.
"I think the RC is a really good idea for
some people, but I just couldn't stand the
intensity of the place. Anyway, I am inter-
ested more in a thorough education," says
one student now in LSA.

It seems that most students who drop-out
of the college do so for two reasons:
-Most RC dropouts say they strongly dis-
liked their RC classes because they felt un-
comfortable with the RC system of no reg-
ular grades and few tests. Many of these
same students say they also disliked the
dorm life, finding it crowded, noisy, and
offering no place to be alone. These students
usually transfer to the literary college.
-Other students who left the college say
school itself was confining to them, and they
feel the need to move-to experience some-
thing new. Many of these people say they
wanted "to know themselves better" before
attending college.
In addition to these two groups of RC
dropouts, a few students leave the program
each term because they have science majors
and can't devote many credit hours to their
RC courses, which are mainly oriented to-
wards social sciences, and humanities.

RC's attrition rate is
than LSA's rate, with 50
original freshman class
spring.

somewhat lower
per cent of RCs
graduating this

According to RC staff, some of these stu-
dents later return to the college and say
they didn't understand the RC's educational
goals before, and now regret their earlier
decision to leave.
Of those students who leave the RC to
"get their head straight," as one student
puts it, many will do something like hitch-
hike west or motorcycle through the South.
According to Paul Wagner, assistant to
the director, a lot of these students seek
re-admittance to the program after a year
or so of another environment.
But then, some don't. As one former RC
student explained it, "I don't need the RC
or any school because now I've got the
equipment to keep on learning for as long
as I want."

I

, v

Vanguard F
COUNTRY J
MCDONALD

This new car is the best reason
not to buy a Volkswagen Beetle.
In a year when every car maker seems to be
giving you one reason or another not to buy a
Volkswagen Beetle, it might be a good idea to
listen to the best reason.
Volkswagen's Super Beetle.
It has almost twice the luggage space as the
Beetle of yesteryear.
It has a longer-lasting, more powerful engine.
It has a new suspension system for a smoother
ride.
It has a flow-through. ventilation system to bring
in fresh air when the windows are closed.
The interior is, to be honest, much nicer.
The floor, for example, is fully carpeted.
In all, it has 89 things you could never find on a
Beetle.
So of all the claims you'll hear this year by car
makers that their cars are "better than a Beetle,"
there's only one car maker with 25 years experi-
ence in small cars to back it up.
Volkswagen.

lecorft presents
DoE mold On
Its Coma
4
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v4v Sp¢ ;vq,;.; {:":ir ..,?"r "'" L",",+.,"L"+'S.; y: d;RYA....,b::Sii"::,r:,';r,:.;ti"}:
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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
375},rr, } { v.L Y : iY.;'.. L"<";" "e"" t,"y}p;r," """ b?}L:4::::Lt;.".}v:.": rx.;n }{:
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f or m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices are not accepted for
publication. For more information,
phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY, APRIL 10

j . Directions Ensemble, Univ.
Orchestra, Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
University Activities Center: L i v e eg
band, Diag, noon. . S1
Baseball: Mich. vs. Iowa, F i s h e r
Stadium, 2 p.m. The following individua
Tennis: Mich. vs. wisconsin, Ferry reached through the Fore
Field, 3 p.m. Div., rms. 22-24, lMchUin
Astronomy Colloquium: L. Bautz, M. Yassin, Univ. of Malas
Northwestern U., "Classification of Lumpus; April 17-19.
Clusters of alGax
Clusters of Galaxies," P&A Colloq. " "" ::: :{.:'::::::=":::'..x
Rm., 4 p.m. ORGANIZTA
English xtEandinse on
English and Extension Service: M.
amberger,poetry reading, Multi-pur-NOTICE
pusoe Rm, UGLI, 4:10 p.m.
Gilbert & Sullivan: "Ruddygore," I " #k%.t :i ,.*es sm##.
Lydia Mendelssohn, 7, 10 p.m.
International Folk Dance: Barbour ahai Student GrouGI
Gym, ~.ing, April 16, 8 p.m., UGLI
School of Music: New Music for Or- pose room; speaker; Joy an
chestra and Ensemble, Contemporary Earl.
wUM Graduate Outing

i
Syhmphons
itors

y]

}
xal can be
reign Visitot
pion~ 4-2148: 11
eyya;" I uala;
i
I
TION
public meet
A Multipur-
end/or David
Club, every
t p.m., Meet
;kharn where
Oternoon . of
%I after the !

f
Gradtlit 9q
l
courses
RC
+Cont.intied fYom Page 1)
i However, cr ites of the , Res-
; idential College contend that.pa;ss-
fail grading encourages stude its
to breeze througli courses with, a
minimum amount of effort.'
To back up their charges; _, tlyey
point to the factthat only two lo
three her cent of RC stttdenU
fail their .,courses.
Countering these argumerits,
Michael Springler, a drama lec-
turer at the college, says, "Letter
I grades tend to standardize the
individual. The evaluation al-
lows for a very thorough anoY.Y,
sis of the students' strong . and
weak points in the class."
Recently, the Residential Col-
lege set up a new method of eval-
uating students, where -- if de-
sired by the student -- evaluations
_will:,be written by a joint efofrt
of the instructor and student, and
signed by both.
The new system will go into ef-
feet next year.
R+C faculty also say that grades
create a barrier between teachers
and students, and make students
'wan£ to "psyche out" teachers to
! get a good grade.
"Teachers often hold grades
'over 'a students head, saying, you
do this work or I'll flunk you,'"
i says one RC student.
Without that sort of pressure
here, students can feel more re-
laxed: and be more creative."
In , addition to grades, many
teachers at the college view finals
as a poor indicator of what a
student has learned, and few re-
quire their class to , take final
exams.
} "Your participation all through
the semester should play a larger
role in determining what you've
gotten from the course rather
than a one-hour final at the
end," says one RC student.
For those courses in which per-
odic testing can show a student
how he's progressing -- such as
language classes teachers often
give ungraded proficiency Nests..
"Tests in RC are set up large-
ly as a measure to allow people to
judge for themselves how they
have mastered the material ,up to
that point," says Charles Maur-
er, ar professor in the G e r m a n
department.

I! I

__ ._
I-
_ .

Sun, Rain or Shine, 1:30
at Huron St. side of Rack
cars will leave for an al
hiking. Dinner is optional
hike.

H ,F"'
" 1

ON ITIRROR GIB If IUNI... 90 MY
MCAN IUD IRI p

Howard Cooper Volkswagen Inc.
2575 So. State St., Ann Arbor Phone 761-3200
Open Mon. & Thurs. till 9 P.M. Overseas Delivery Available

au? hO RIZq
VEALC*

r 'r*
_J
' VANGUARD
r
ti

Avoilohle alyuur record store

Available in all tape configurations from Ampex.

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$476
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So Step Inside HIFI BUYS and take in our BOSE COM-
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the BOSE can make!
$476
HI-Ft BUYS
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UM Falk Dance Club, every Friday,
7:30-11 p.m., Barbour Gym. Teaching
7:30 - 9:00 p.m. Open to everyone.
For further information call N a n c y
j Johnston, 769-3164 after 5.

WE STYLE HAIR.
We Don't Just Cat It,
Let us style your hair to fit
your personality < .
8 BARBERS, no waiting
OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola ,Barbers
Arborland-Campus

BABY CLINIC

'

Maple Village-East U. cat So, U.

"'

SATURDAY, APRIL 17
1 P.M.-4 P.M.
at Free People's Clinic
302 E. Liberty

Subfser be to

The Hichigan Daily

'JIG
13
CRIBARI '
y V // YIMO OlW 6A ti1 HS0 e
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It s so convenient-and., cheaper
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Greene I s Cleaners
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