100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CREATION
WE ARE ESTABLISHING A
TOTALLY NEW KIBBUTZ IN ISRAEL
WE NEED OTHERS TO COMMIT THEMSELVES TO THIS
Venture in Pioneering and Communal Living

page three

aloe

Sici'titn

ttiiy

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINE HSS PHONE: 764-005-t

Friday, January 15, 1971 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

1

I

We Are Looking For
YOUNG ZIONISTS
Who Are Ready To
Immigrate to ISRAEL,
in SEPT. '71 or SEPT. '72

IF INTERESTED CONTACT
GARIN KIBBUTZ
HASHACHAR
c/o LESLIE FRIED
116 W. 14th ST.
NEW YORK, N.Y. 10011
TEL: 212-ORS-1164

news briefs
By The Associated Press

an ILS project
CHINA WEEK JAN. 10-16
-Friday, Jan. 15-
mixed media/panel/workshops
"CULTURAL REVOLUTION"
mixed media event-around CBS
News color documentoar
-PANEL- -WORKSHOPS-
Robert Williams Education for Liberation
William Hinton Art, Media and Culture
Orville Schell Communes and
Leni Sinclair Collectives
7:30 P.M. ADMISSION $1
NATURAL SCIENCE AUDITORIUM off Diag
IN CASE OF STRIKE:
University Reformed Church, 1001 E. Huron near Fletcher
H U RRY
HONEDON'T MISS IT!
482-3300
Spend a marvelous evening with eight ofdthe boys.
Mart Crowley's
/N Tilt
...is ot a musical.
ACmamCiCRfatIi.AN AGnvReeese CobyDoe[ 1~i

rI;
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION yesterday halted new ap-
plications for the government's $140 million subsidized housing
program.
Housing Seeretary George Romney said the program has been
Mfound riddled with abuse.
Romney said a portion of the so-called 235 Program for low
and moderate income families dealing with the purchase of existing
homes, rather than new ones, will be shut down until reforms can be
made.
Romney's action contradicts the administration's previous state-
ments refuting the program's critics.
SOUTH VIETNAMESE rangers yesterday battled to a key
mountain pass in Cambodia.
The forces, led by an armored column and aided by bombers
and artillery, killed 41 North Vietnamese troops in a clash aboutj
95 miles north of Pnom Penh.
THE DEFENSE DEPARTMENT has not ruled out additional
U.S. aircraft aid to South Vietnamese troops operating in Cam-
bodia.
Pentagon sources said yesterday Secretary of Defense Melvin
Laird believes such operations would not violate the congressional
prohibition on the use of American advisors or ground troops in Cam-
bodia.
The aircraft would airlift and resupply the South Vietnamese.
troops.
SCOTLAND YARD yesterday began an intensive search of
London hoping to curb a terrorist gang called the Angry Brigade.
The terrorist group is suspected of and has claimed responsibility'
for the bombing of a Cabinet Minister's home and a kidnap threat
against another minister.
London police have been alerted to keep a close protectiveI
watch on the homes of cabinet ministers and some members of parlia-
ment.
* * *

High court
Ibars Govt.'
mail hunts
WASHINGTON (Y - T h e
Supreme Court yesterday bar-
red the Post Office from inter-
cepting mail to publishers of
obscene books and magazines.
In a unanimous decision,
Justice William Brennan Jr.
said two federal laws used by
the Post Office were not "sen-
sitive" enough tothe right of
free speech.
The laws were declared uncon-
stitutional.
In a second ruling, the c o u r t
required hundreds of Southern
cities to obtain federal Approval
before expanding their boundaries
to take in more white voters or
changing the locations of polling
places.
Since annexations and polling
location changes may discriminate
against black voters, said Bren-
nan, approval of the U.S. attorney
general or a U.S. district court in
Washington is required.
The ruling applies to the areas
covered by the 1965 federal voting
right law.
The Nixon administration had
appealed to the court to uphold
the obscenity laws. Otherwise, the
government argued, the Post Of -
fice's "power to shield the public
from fraudulent advertising"
would be weakened.
The court's decision, however,
does not affect the government's
power to prosecute dealers. Also,
the court specifically bypassed the
issue of whether people have a
constitutional right to receive ob-
scene books and devices by mail.
Brennan held the invalidated
laws unconstitutional on two
counts.
First they put the burden on the
publisher to prove he has a right
to receive his mail.
Then, the justice cited a 1965
court decision which struck down
movie censorship procedures in
Maryland.

-Associated Press
PRESIDENT NIXON'S FAMILY watches him throw snowballs yesterday in Lincoln, Nebraska,
where he addressed a University of Nebraska convocation.
Nixon challenges youth to work
in system' with 18-year-old vote

LINCOLN; Neb. OP)-Declaring
that "there can be no generation

Mon.-Thurs. at

11

7 & 9-Fri.: 7, 9, 1 1
482-3300 I F PAEREH

A U.S.-CANADIAN commission yesterday reported that ser-
ious pollution is harming health and property around the lower
Great Lakes.
The commission made 22 recommendations, ranging f r o m a'
Eclampdown on phosphorous discharges from detergents to tighter
curbs against underwater oil drilling and waste disposal from ships.
The joint governmental commission was set up in 1911 to handle
cross-boundary matters.
SLAIN BLACK LEAD

gap in America," President Nixon
yesterday challenged a campus
audience to try out "the system"
through the newly extended right
to vote for 18-year-olds.
Only once did Nixon mention
any new administration aims-he
detailed a proposal to consolidate
the Peace Corps, Vista and related
ER

1

Tributes mark King's birthdays

"No one should miss it!

"A tender love of two youngsters that surges and
explodes. A stunningly beautiful drama.
The'picture is fascinating in magnificent natural colors.
The director has guided the action like a master
choreographer, staging a stately pavane of unyielding
tempo and doom. The exceptionally appealing young
players, their nude scene together and one candid
glimpse of a male sauna bath, are entirely within
the content of this extraordinary picture,
joining beauty and horror in a rich, scaldingI
eyeful and a haunting love story."-N.Y. Timesj
"It is on every level an amazing film.
Definitely the most incredible,
beautiful and impressive
romance of our time."
--Bernard Drew,
Hartford Times
OFFCIAL SWEDISH ENTRY
AT XXth INTERNATIONAL
FILM FESTIVAL IN CANNESa
Prentoulis Films presents
H mNAGBARD & SIGNE
A LOVE AS ETERNAL AS THE MIDNIGHT SUN
with Eva Dohlbeck * Gunnar Bonskrond *Oleg Vidov * Gite Henning. An ASA Film.AS-Movie Art Europe A.
Edd fiet; Co-Production, Photography enning 8endtsen; Directed By Gobiel Axel. A PrantoulisFfilms Releose.
TONIGHT -IN EASTMAN COLOR
AT -U U~EE &DIAL
7-4 P.M. ~hi~LB~ -6416

By The Associated Press
The nation observes the 42nd
birthday of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr. today with tributes to
the murdered civil rights leader
and renewed efforts to get the
date declared a national holi-
day.
Memorial and religious serv-
ices, rallies and demonstrations
are scheduled across the coun-
try, from small Southern towns
where his crusade was launched
to the larger cities where it later
focused.
Schools, businesses and gov-
ernment offices will close in
some cities, but numerous others
have no plans for special ob-
servances.
In Atlanta, where King was
born in 1929, his widow Coretta
will attend a memorial service

at the family's Ebenezer Bap-
tist church.
In Memphis, Tenn., where
King died at the hands of an
assassin on April 4, 1968, ex-
cerpts of his speeches and writ-
ings will be read to a gathering
at a ,Baptist church.
The Rev. Ralph David Aber-
nathy, who succeeded King as
head of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, w 11 1
lead a march to the Capitol to
present petitions asking Con-
gress to designate King's birth-
day a national holiday.
The date is now recognized as
a holiday by nine states, but at-
tempts are underway to have
other states to follow suit.
In Washington Wednesday.
the U.S. Commission on Civil
Rights paid tribute to King,
calling him "an American hero

who gave his life -hat others
might live in freedom, and,
above all, in peace."
In New York, Mayor John V.
Lindsay. proclaiming "Martin
Luther King Day," urged resi-
dents to "draw strength from
King'stmemoryrjust asrwe
drew strength from his pres-
ence.",
A former aide of King, Dr.
Wyatt Tee Walker, will lead a
demonstration in his memory
outside the New York headquar-
ters of the Great Atlantic & Pa-
cific Tea Co. The retail food
chain has been the target of
past demonstrations for alleged
job discrimination.
King was shot deadfrom am-
bush as he stood on the balcony
of a Memphis motel. He was in
the city leading a strike of city
sanitation workers.

federal efforts to tap volunteer
service into one new agency.
Nixon said the as yet unnamed
new agency would "give young
Americans an expanded opportun-
ity for the services they want to
give-and that will give them
what is not now offered, a chance
to transfer between service abroad
and at home."
In his prepared address at a
faculty-student convocation at the
University of Nebraska, Nixon
claimed his administration "has
no higher priority than to end the
war" in Indochina.
But Nixon emphasized the role
of youth in achieving "great
goals" to deal with environmental
problems, urban blight, over-pop-
ulation, rural ills and "poverty in
a land of plenty."
In a television-radio interview
last week with four broadcast
Journalists, Nixon cited a Life
magazine poll that, he conceded,
would indicate the younger voters
at this time would not vote the
way he might prefer.
But he expressed the view that
the youth vote will be up for
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
agec by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
glass postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mai,
summer Session published Tuesday
thrrugh Saturday morning. Subscrip-
'don rates: $5. by carrier, $5 by mal

State, U.S. grants to aid
heroin treatment center

grabs in 1972 and indicated he
would be making a pitch for it.
His appearance here apparently
marked the beginning of his per-
sonal effort to solicit the allegi-
ance of the newly enfranchised
young voters.
According to the White House,
Nixon made his Lincoln appear-
ance largely because the Univer-
sity of Nebraska football team was
designated national champions in
a recent Associated Press poll.
This was the President's fourth
address to a campus crowd since
taking office. -_

Gov. William Milliken yester-
day announced a $65,700 grant
for a Washtenaw County heroin
treatment center, which will al-
so receive about $45,000 in local
matching funds.
The grant, from federal funds;
distributed by the Michigan
Commission on L a w Enforce-
ment and Criminal Justice, will
allow the continuation and ex-
pansion of a clinic presently
run at the Summit St. Medical
Center.
About 210 addicts will be able
to receive treatment from the
center, according to official es-
timates. T h e y will be treated
with methadone, a less danger-
ous drug than heroin.

The program will be sponsor-
ed by the Community Mental
Health Center, which Gov. Mil-
liken named last year as the lo-
cal anti-drug coordinator.
Authorities hope this pro-
gram w ill serve to spearhead
other similar programs in an
attack on all kinds of d r u g s
throughout the county.
Mental Health officials plan
to submit a series of grant ap-
plications to the state in March
in an effort to involve many lo-
cal groups and agencies in the
drug fight.
They have asked all local
agencies which could contribute
to d r u g treatment to submit
grants to the state.

BENEFIT FOR WHITE PANTHER PARTY
DEFENSE FUND
ALLEN GINSBERG
at
FRI. NITE 8 & 10 P.M. $2.00

375N. AE R0.
MON.-FRI. 7:05-9:15

Barbra
Streisand
Panavsion Color

SAT.-SUN.
2:00-3:45-6:30
7:15-9:15
Ile sf

"AS DAZZLING A CALVACADE AS HAS
EVER BEEN PUT ON A SCREEN!"
-Newsweek Magazine

I

SHOWS AT
1:00
3:30
6:05
8:40

in

the

university

cellar

FRIENDS OF THE WHITE PANTHERS PRESENTS
ROCK & ROLL MUSIC

Is

still
with

coming

through

I

at the

UNION BALLROOM

thousands

of

with

I

'CH

RYDER

new

and

used

books

up

R

T

1

i

US

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan