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April 13, 1971 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Tuesday, April 1, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

' Page Seven

Tuesday, April 13, 1971 THE MICHIGAN DAiLY Page Seven
a U

RC: Juggling education

for four years

I

ILOFN4

(Continued from Page 1)
value the RC because it has taught
me to think, something I probably
wouldn't have gotten from LSA."
Since most RC students take
about 50 per cent of their classes
in the literary college, they are
inclined to compare the two col-
leges.
In contrasting their LSA and
RC experiences, most students say
that RC professors prod them to
take more of an active role in their
own learning processes, allowing
them to find and develop their
interests.
In praising this method of
learning, the RC student com-
plains about the methods used in
literary college courses, saying
that many LSA professors ask
students to study a syllabus which;

may not interest them. Thus, the
student is not motivated to take
an active role in the classroom and
his studies, they add.
Yet the Residential College stu-
dent will also readily admit that
because of the pass-fail system, he
can, if he chooses, slide through
his RC courses with a minimum of4
work and still get a grade of
"pass." At the present time, only
about two to three per cent of the
college's students fail their RC
courses.
As a senior who is majoring in
Creative Writing says, "You can
pursue your curiousities without
end here and you'll never run out
of resources or faculty encourage-
ment. But you can also slide
through this place on your ass and

.
'6i

GIRLS!
Going to be needing a job?
If you find things are kind
of tough, call TAYLOR
CAREER COLLEGE at 769-
4507 and ask for JACK.
He'll tell you how to pre-
pare yourself for a well
paying job.

zml

TAYLOR CAREER COLLEGE

621 East William, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48101
phone: 769-4507
An Educational Service of
International Telephone and Telegraph Corporation

ITT

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graduate just the same. The
choice is yours."
When asked to answer honestly,
most RC seniors say they have
floated through two or three of
their courses, significantly bene-
fitting from the rest.
But the seniors'stress that aca-
demics are only a part of their
experience in the RC. They be-
lieve the small enrollment in the
RC college enhanced the college's
ns of community.
But the seniors feel that this
"community spirit" has lessened
with the addition of the last two
freshman classes.
With nearly 700 students now,
in the Residential College as op-
posed to the 217 who first entered,
the seniors explain that the close-
ness of the college has necessarily
changed,
"We were special because we
were first. Together, like a family,
we built the college from nothing.
I guess when the next classes came
and things were already running,
WELCOME
STUDENTS:
Let us style your hair to fit
your personality . . .
0 8 BARBERS, no waiting
0 OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
ArborIand-Campus
Maple Village

well, they didn't feel so needed
and involved," says one senior.
While the alterations in the
core curriculum and the diffusion
of community spirit of the RC
represent basic changes in the or-
iginal concept of the college, the
RC community continues to make
other, somewhat lesser changes in
an effort to improve the college's
academic programs.
The college's art program, for
instance, was built from scratch
by a group of students who last
year recruited a teacher from the
architecture and design school to
teach a non-credit course on
drawing.
Since that time, the arts pro-
gram at the college has blossomed
into one of the most popular de-
partments, with a lottery held each
semester to determine who may
join its classes.
The program now includes class-
es on silkscreening, sculpture, ce-
ramics, and drawing and is hoping
to expand once funds are avail-
able.
As one freshman explained this
sort of involvement in the en-
hancing the RC program, "Each
kid feels its his responsibility to
make things better around here,
and it's been proved that he can
do it."I
But as critics of the RC point
out, the financing of special pro-
jects, such as art programs, cost
the University far more money
per RC student than what is us-
ually allotted for an undergradute
in the literary college.
separate administration and staffz
Maintaining small class size, a
and the multitude of other RC
programs not found in the parent
college have boosted the college's
monetary needs.
Although originally designed as
an _$11.8 million classroom and
dormitory unit to be located on'
North Campus, sufficient funding
was unavailable for the North
Campus project. During the first
year of the college, the RC com-
munity unanimously decided to
stay in the quad because of its
central location and started lay-
ing plans for the building's re-
novation.
This year with the completion

-Daily-Terry McCarthy

RC a+t show

it s not too late for our spring term
CALL NOW FOR TYPING, SPEED WRITING,
OFFICE MACHINE AND DICTAPHONE
TAYLOR CAREER COLLEGE
769-4507'

of $2.3 million repairs and re-i
modelling, East Quad is one of thet
University's most comfortable res-1
idence halls. However, critical#
budgetary problems have arisen1
for the college, which now threat-l
en its continued existence.
The teaching staff is hit most
hard by the funding problem. 1
Most all of the teaching staffaf
Residential College are h i r e d1
through the literary school's de-1
partments and teach at the college
for a limited duration. Because of1
the University's current budget
crisis, departments are frequently4
unwilling to loan out faculty
members to RC.,
Citing long work hours, growing
class sizes, and' little contact with1
their home departments, teachers
at the RC feel the college should"
be granted money and sufficient
autonomy to hire, promote, and1
pay its own faculty.
Marcia Viteillo, a lecturer in ro-

Why pay for dry cleaning
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So, store your clothes free and in addition get
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mance languages and literature,
emphasizes that regardless of the
faculty members' commitment -to
the college, they can't continue
their present pace "and hope to live
past 30."
"In trying to bring this program
(RC) to fruition, some people have
been totally drained," says Vit-
teillo. Agreeing with Viteillo, Betsy
Feifer-a drama and literature lec-
turer-says, "I really feel I'm
learning a lot from teaching here,
but my lord, it's such a teaching
commitment. I'm working witl
each student outside of class as
much as in."
Despite their "taxing" teaching
commitment, most teachers at
Residential College expressed en-
thusiasm for the college and their
students.
"It's very, very fulfilling to find
kids so responsive to your teach-
ing," Feifer says. "Friendships
here extend beyond class and are
not structured along class lines.
And friendships are not just lim-
ited to teachers and students, for
just down the hall from the class-
rooms is the Dean's office.
James Robertson, director of the
college, runs an informal adminis-
tration where students are wel-
come, and encouraged to stop by
and talk.
As one student says, "Where else
can you see a dean the same dcy
you want him?"
TOMORROW: THE RC STUDENT
STUDENTS:
DON'T LEAVE
the country without
the offical AUS
Identity Card
As a member of the American
Union of Students you can en-
joy travel as a student with
world wide )service center to
assist you.
For information write:
AUS
400 S. Division
Ann Arbor, Mi. 48104
OR CALL: (313) 663-3152

662-4241

662-4251

3

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_ a
Laceint a bllyboo. Ruged comortble
grea tolookat.In rownsadle lathr.
Or drtybuc sude.Far ettr tan areoot
Ar" .Li t. .,.f

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There's also the Youth Passport* Card. It lets \(u
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It has the Independent Getaway Brochure. For
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And it has applications Ior both the Youth
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Mail in the (coupon for [WAs tree Getaway
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And find out how\ easy getting away really is.
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