100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 13, 1971 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


1

Both pa
WASHINGTON (IP) - Much of the tra-
ditional hoopla may be missing from the
1972 political conventions; they won't
start the roll calls with Alabama and the
favorite sons won't be favored any more.
Plans being formulated by special
commissions of both parties indicate
Democratic changes will be far more
sweeping than those in the Republican
convention.
Two Democratic groups have been
working since early 1969 to revise the
delegate selection process and the con-
vention itself. Sweeping changes have
already been enacted and others are in
prospect.
The delegate-selection changes, ap-
proved at a Democratic National Com-
mittee meeting in February, are de-
page three
Tuesday, April 13, 1971

rties alter convention

procedures

signed to make the process more demo-
cratic and safeguard the rights of mi-
norities. They assure the next conven-
tion will have more women, blacks and
young people.
Changes in convention rules still are
under consideration by a group headed
by Rep. James O'Hara of Michigan.
Final decisions are scheduled this
spring.
The Republican National Committee
issued a report in January on conven-
tion revision and is now working on
delegate-selection procedures.
Republican rules, however, provide
that one convention sets the apportion-
ment and selection procedures for the
next so that most of the recommended
changes won't apply until 1976.

These changes appear in the proposals
from both parties:
-Candidates. Both recognize a differ-
ence between serious presidential candi-
dates and favorite sons, often put into
nomination either to hold a delegation
uncommitted or to give a state or poli-
tician extra publicity.
Democrats define a serious candidate
as one with substantial support in three
states, Republicans say five.
-Favorite sons. Both would limit to
five minutes the time for presentation
of nominating and seconding speeches
for favorite-son candidates. Democrats
allot 30 minutes for speeches for each
serious candidate, Republicans would
cut it to 14.
-Demonstrations. Democrats propose
Rir4iio 11

to ban demonstrations, as they di(
1968, and provide that time for any 's
taneous" demonstration by deleg
would come out of the time for ni
nating and seconding speeches. Re
licans propose to limit demonstratior
serious candidates and eliminate dei
strations for favorite son nominatior
-Roll call. Democrats propose tc
place the traditional Alabama-to-N
ming roll call for presidential non
tions and determine the order by
Republicans would pick the first s
by lot, then proceed alphabetically.
-Platform hearings. Both parties1
to hold hearings nationwide to get i
form suggestions.
Efforts also are under way to rec

minor speeches and presentations-_ to
make the conventions more interesting
for television viewers.
Democrats have adopted an elaborate
credentials challenge procedure, are
studying proposals to have the conven-
tion elect its own chairman, and are
adopting logistical arrangements to give
equal say to each of the presidential
hopefuls.
The Democratic National Committee
has approved a new apportionment in-
creasing the strength of large, industrial
states and reducing votes of smaller
states.
The Republican apportionment 'con-
tinues the old system giving bonus dele-
gates to states carried by the GOP iq the
last presidential-election.

J

DIAL 662-6264
at State & Liberty

ACADEMY AWARD
NOMINEE!
1 :10-3:45-6:15-9 P.M.

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

r

NOTE SPECIAL
SHOW
TIMES!

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

BOGFMAN
2navisDonTechnic WEor
* 2ND HIT WEEK*y

I

nimi

_... ..
lililis.n

moommow

NOMINATED FOR
ACADEMY if
BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR
BEST ACTRESS GP
BEST ACTOR
Thursday is
Academy Award Night
Attend the 7 P.M. show and then
watch Channel 4 at 10P.M.

news briefs
By The Associated Press
A WEST POINT GRADUATE who sought an Army dis-
charge as a conscientious objector against the Vietnam war is
going to be granted his wish, an Army official said yesterday.
Army Information Officer Joseph Hedley said First Lt. Louis
Font will be honorably discharged, but did not elaborate on the
reasons behind the decision.
Previously the military had opposed Font's honorable discharge
and had accused him of five counts of willful disobedience of orders
for which he could have been sentenced to 25 years in prison. Hedley
said these charges would be dropped.
I . BRITISH FORCES yesterday encircled Londonderry, North-
ern Ireland's second largest city, after ten soldiers were wounded
in Easter day rioting.
The troops fired rubber bullets to drive back the stone-throwing
demonstrators in the Roman Catholic enclave of Bogside.
Other troops were kept on alert as both Catholics and Protest-
ants planned more of the parades that are traditional during Easter
in the province.
* * k
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday announced a $1-million pro-
gram to attract disadvantaged veterans to expanded GI- bill
job and education benefits.
Nixon said the program is aimed at direct contact with 350,000
Vietnam-era unemployed veterans, and will start on an experimental
basis in low-income and blue-collar neighborhoods in ten cities.
"We owe these men a debt of gratitude for their service-but we
also owe them something more," the President said. "The dismaying
fact is that unemployment among Vietnam-era veterans still is
significantly greater than it is among non-veterans in the same
age bracket," he added.
:*

NEW DELHI, India (N - Premier Chou En-lai of the Peo-
ple's Republic of China has pledged his nation's support.to
Pakistan against attack by "Indian expansionists," Radio
Pakistan said yesterday.
Chou's message to President Agha Mohammed Yahya
Khan followed a strong Chinese note to New.. Delhi last Tues-
day claiming India was interfering in the civil war raging in
East Pakistan
Chou's message said China had noted the Indian govetn-
ment recently had been carrying out large-,scale interference
in Pakistan's internal affairs.

Chinese
aidto'I

pledge
'akistan

PARAMOU NTPICTURS PRESENS S,'"}.
Ali Mac~raws Ryan Whea
A HOWARD GMINSKY-ARTHUR HILER Production "
John Marley&Ray Milland
9TH
WEEK

603 E. Liberty
DIAL 5-6290
Doors Open 12:45
Shows at I, 3, 5, 7, 9
Free List Suspended

Co -Associated Press
W estPoint CO
First Lt. Louis Font displays the honorable discharge he received
yesterday at Ft. Meade. Font is the first West Point graduate to be
discharged on the grounds he was a conscientious objector. See
News Briefs.
'NOTHING NEW':
Egyptians reject
S .
Israeli peace offer
By The Associated Press

Lm=

02 ADULTS
0 NLY

ROUBLE

i
a;
.-

r

a garden
of sensuality
teenie
tulip
Adults Only
a CINEX film:
eastman color

.1

SeU
, .. sexualj
.r ," brutal ity
and
Smer
r I U
ci~emU

THE CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD (CAB) yesterday auth- Egyptian officials yesterday turned down an offer by Israeli Defense
orized a temporary six per cent increase in domestic airfares. Minister Moshe Dayan to withdraw Israel's troops from the Suez Canal
Airlines indicated they would put new fares into effect May 7. under a permanent cease-fire agreement with the stipulation that no
The board also moved to permit airlines to raise the increase Soviet or Egyptian troops cross the canal.
to nine per cent within 50 days. The Egyptians insisted their forces must occupy positions on the
Edward Carlson, president of United Airlines said: "The increase Israeli-held side of the canal.
will enable carriers to bridge part of the inflationary cost-price gap "Egypt will accept nothing less," officials in Cairo said.
that has continued to widen in the air transport industry, despite "We have nothing new to add. Our position has been clarified
stringent economy programs." by President Anwar Sadat's restatement of April 3."
Sadat, in his restatement, demanded the partial withdrawal of
OVER 1,000 JEWS were given permission to leave the Soviet Israel's forces from the Sinai Pe-;-
Union for Israel in March, a knowledgable source reported yester- ninsula as the first step toward
day, relinquishing all Egyptian tern - J\Tgi jjj tax
tory occupied since 1967. SadatE
The number of immigration permits, he said, exceeds the total said he would then reopen the
of about 1,000 issued in all of 1970. canal. WASHINGTON (IP)- form-
Soviet authorities were believed to have adopted a more liberal Sadat also said Egypt would
emigration policy to relieve pressure from the Jewish community promptly close the waterway to er chief of White House eco-
after a series of demonstrations last month by Jewish applicants "assume its national duties" as nomic advisers said yesterday
for visas. Israel withdrew. President Nixon's multibillion-
Dayan apparently envisaged a dollar tax break f o r business
type 'of demilitarization of the could be inflationary, would ac-
THE UNITED STATES table-tennis delegation got a look at western Sinai to be patrolled by in- tually hurt investment in the
the Great Wall of China yesterday as their friendly Chinese ternational forces. near future and should be with-
hosts accompanied them on their tour of the country. drawn,
The Great Wall was one of the things the Americans said they On April 3, Sadat agreed to an "This looks to me like t h e
wanted to see during their week of sightseeing and exhibition matches 'international arrangement" n wrong tax cut m the wrong way
. Sinai to keep the hostile forces at the wrong time," said Wal-
in the People's Republic of China. ter Heller, chairman of the
The players, accompanied by several American journalists, are apart. He accepted the notion of Council of Economic Advisers
the first Americans to visit China since the Communists came to demilitarization zones straddling under President John Kennedy.
power in 1949. the frontier on both sides. He joined a well-coordinated

Without specifying what kind of
support would be given, the radio
quoted Chou as saying: "Should
the Indian expansionists dare to
launch aggression against Pakis-
tan, the Chinese government and
people will as always support the
'Pakistanigovernment and people
in their just struggle to safeguard
the state's integrity and national
independence."
Chou said the civil war in East
Pakistan is an internal affair that
can only be settled by the Pakis-
tani people without outside inter-
ference.
In the Indian-Pakistani war of
September 1965 China issued a
similar warning, telling India not
to open a second front in East
Pakistan. The war was confined
to West Pakistan.
Earlier yesterday India vehe-
mently denied a Pakistani charge
that two companies of Indian
troops entered East Pakistan.
Official Indian sources said that
the East Pakistanis were using a
mass civil disobedience campaign,
as well as conventional warfare, to
try to win the civil conflict against
the heavily armed West Pakistan
army.
One high official said the East
Pakistanis were cutting telephone
lines and trying to take over tele-
graph centers, post offices and tax
collection offices.
proposal hit
chorus of opposition to Nixon's
proposal to speed up tax write-
offs for depreciating equipment
at a 20 per cent faster pace, a
system that could cost the
Treasury $36 billion over the
next 10 years.
The opposition is led by con-
sumer advocate Ralph Nader,
Democratic Sens. Edmund Mus-
kie of Maine and George Mc-
Govern of South Dakota, a pub-'
lic-interest tax lobby called Tax-
ation With Representation, sev-
eral private economists and:
some union leaders.

Ceylon steps
up attacks on
Guevarists
COLOMBO () - Government
forces heavily outnumbered on
the ground - have stepped up their
air war against the Che Guevarist
rebels who . are, still' reported in
control of Ceylon's outlying, jungle
and plantation region.
There was increased air activity
over Colombo yesterday and the
government announced aerial at-
tacks on the revolutionaries in
Kesgama and Waga, rubber plan-
tations near the city.
Occasional air raids by twin-
propeller craft with gunners lean-
ing out the side were reported by
travellers returning to Colombo.
Two large Soviet-built aircraft
were sighted, and are believed to
have been brought from India to
help the hard pressed government.
Government spokesmen reported
several clashes with the insurgetts
yesterday, claiming 20 terrorists
were killed in a battle at Balle, in
the north-central. region of the
country.
Both the United States and Bri-
tain are reported considering a re-
quest from Prime Minister Sin-
mave Bandaranaike for elicop-
ters. The United States has already
agreed to supply spare parts for
four American helicopters already
in the Ceylon air force.
The Michigan Daily, edited and mn-
aged by studenlts iat the. University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Meh-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arzr,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through' Sn'nday #iirning Univer-
sity year. Subscr ption rates: $10' by
carrier, $i6 by' mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.;

I

I .

.h

3 1 ashinton

I YPSIL..ANTI

'N PONE
442-3300FREE 1(116
- LI6HTED Nfl U

...fi ...r. ...t.. .. . .....:: . . .:.
The University of Michigan Programn in Comnparative Literature
an d
Center for Russian and East European Studies
invite everyone interested to 'meet
and his 'wife,
Constanta Buzea
who will read from their poetry, ini English translation
and in the original Romanian
DATE: Wednesday, April 14
TIME: 2:30 pm.
...r' . . r .. ......-. .... ., .. .}.t .. ... t.........- . .2 :oo: -::;:::::: ::. ":':. :r:+}>:.... . 3' :::

i .

EUROPE

JUNE
Sponsored by UAC

FLIGHTS

Flight No.

Routing

001
002
013

Det-Lon-Det
Det-Lon-Det
NY-Lon-NY

Depart
6/28
6/29
6/29

8/28
8/26
7/30

Return

Weeks

8
8
4

Price
219
219
209

UAC-SI HAS OTHER DEPARTURES FROM WHICH TO CHOOSE ON
CARRIES SUCH AS CALEDONIAN AIRWAYS, CAN-PAC AIRLINES, AND AIR CANADA
Open only to U of M students, faculty, staff, and immediate families

I

PHONE OR STOP IN:
UAC TRAVEL-2ND FLOOR MICHIGAN UNION
763-2147 9-5 DAILY

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES BY:
STUDENTS INTERNATIONAL I
510 MACK STREET
AWN ARBR .MICHIGIAN 48104

I

I II

.,i

I II Ii

' '

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan