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April 11, 1971 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-11

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 11, 1971

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Urdm \Vn- andI wen in frn (Alwhen he took a
defenn ew on the seventh.
ai nL u h itLPI th ninth, o ano
r. AI Uhree: the par-five 13L'h, putting hhn 10
was at 215 strokns Untdr par for the tourna-
r and m enta ndt four in z ront of the

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t F) 101 F
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The n NIi ka who had been
U ;I n i >of ti pace through-
I P a amm. i. bgan to
mI U, tIming hisL. enarge just as
n n te visIC n cameras be-

,ito I

Cody
gan the action on the sunsplashed
Augusta National.
SThe "Golden Bear" birdied five
of six holes starting at the 12th
and Coody began to feel the strain.
The 6-foot-2 Texan, who b le w
a chance to win this tournament
in 1969 when he bogeyed the final
three holes, took a three-putt bog-
ey on the 14th.
He managed to par the 520-yard
15th, then three-putted again on
the 16th, missing a three-footer
on his second.
And on ; the 17th, he was near
a tree trunk with his tee shot,
in a trap with his second and was
on the green, seven feet from the
pin with his third.
He missed it.
"It would be impossible not to
know that a man like Nicklaus is
gaining on you," Coody said.
"I had an impossible shot to get
to the green in two on 17. I made
a good trap shot and had all you
could ask for, a six or seven-footer
for a par.
"I knew it was slow and didn't
quite hit it solidly enough and it
died right at the cup."

Rick Cornfeld

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-Associated Press
JACK NICKLAUS watches his birdie putt fall on the 17th green in
yesterday's third-round action in the Masters tournament at Augus-
ta, Georgia. Nicklaus shares the lead at seven under with Charles
Coody.

AT EMU

RELAYS:

' e h e Michigan
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t~e U ;ae a tote uckeyeterioy

eutdoor thinclads open strong

The .Detroit Tigers
take a Chance
FUNLOVING DEAN CHANCE plays baseball because it's fun.
He also plays because he makes a lot of money. But the
most interesting reason he has for playing baseball is to get
an education.
"You're going to college to get an education," he said at the
Tiger Press Day early one morning last week, "but you also
get a tremendous education in baseball. There are tremendous
opportunities."
Those who remember Chance as a reported swinging
playboy might snicker at that remark, but Bo Belinsky's
old pal added, "There are occupational opportunities. What
will I do after my career is over? Me, I don't know yet.
Even if I could make twice as much money doing something
out of baseball, I would still play baseball as long as I
could."
Chance, the former boy wonder of the American League, is
now 29, not the age to be washed up, but he has a shoulder
that just doesn't work the way it used to. At the age of 23, he
put together one of the greatest years of any pitcher of the
past decade, with a record of 20-9, an earned run average of
1.65 and 11 shutouts. For those marks, he was given the Cy
Young Award, which in those days was bestowed on the best
pitcher in all of baseball, not just one league.
Chance never had another year quite so great, but even
still, by the time he was 27, he had thrown 32 shutouts. By con-
trast, Hall of Famer Bob Feller, voted the best right hander
ever, only threw 44, and he pitched for 18 years.
Then in1969, while with the divisional pennant-bound
Minnesota Twins, Chance's shoulder kicked the bucket. The
next year he was with the Cleveland Indians, until the last
month of the season when he was sent to the pennant
contending New York Mets. That was last summer, and
this spring he found his way back to Billy Martin on the
pitching-poor Tigers. Today he makes his first start of
the year against Baltimore.
Though he has bounced around a lot :lately, Chance is
philosophical about being traded. There's always a reason for
a trade. "Cleveland needed money," he said, "and I was sold
for $150,000 to the Mets. I went and had a good spring, but
the Mets have a lot of pitching and I guess they felt they could
get more for me than anyone else.
Chance has played for both contending clubs and sorry
also-rans, and, as he yawned and rubbed the sleep, out of
his eyes in the brisk mid-morning air, he recalled what it's
like on a loser. "It's tough. You know you haveto perform
perfectly because you're not going to get much help.
"We lost by one game in '67 (when the Red Sox beat out
the Twins, Tigers and White Sox in a free-for-all) and that
was tough, too. As far as I'm concerned the worst team won.
But I never played on a pennant winner."
He paused then, reflecting, as if trying to concentrate
over the fatigue. "What am I saying?" he said. "In '69 we
won the division with Billy."
Chance, who still looks like the awe-struck Rube he was
when he became famous as the starry-eyed playboy com-
panion of Belinsky on the Los Angeles Angels, claims his
reputation is undeserved. "People forget that that was my
roommate, Belinsky."
But he doesn't seem to care too much what people think
of him. "It don't matter what you do off the field. What your
future is depends on what you do on the mound."

A

By DALE ARBOUR
The Michigan track squad start-
ed off its outdoor season in fine
f o r m yesterday in the Eastern
Michigan University Relays. Al-
though only about half the team
competed, the ones who did par-
ticipate turned in many excellent
performances for this early in the
season.

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Heading
formance
who easily

up the Michigan per-
was Godfrey Murray
won the 120-yard high

New From_ Levi !
For the Student Body:
Bot Jeans
$7.50
PRE-SHRUNK
State Street at Liberty

hurdles with a respectable time of
:13.9.
Eastern Michigan's star hurd-
ler, Bill Tipton did not compete
1 because of a recurring leg injury.
If he had, he would have given
Murray plenty of competition and
some incentive to go faster. Mur-
ray also turned in a third place
performance in the 220-yard dash
where he finished in a time of
:22.3.
In other individual running
events, Bob Fortus turned on his
speed in the final straightaway
of the half mile, but was nipped
at the wire by Eastern Michigan's
Fred Laplante. Laplante was tim-
ed in 1:53.9 while Fortus recorded
a 1:54.0.
In the two mile, Dave Eddy fin-
ished a strong fifth place with a
time of 9:10.4, while Jerome Lie-
benberg of Western Michigan vas
winning that event with a quick
'time of 8:51.1.
In the field events, some Michi-
gan individuals showed great suc-
cess. Paul Toran acquired two sec-
t0 -iwe

and places, one in the shot put
and the other in the discus. His
second place toss in the shot was
49 feet, while he tossed the discus
139-10 for his second place in that
event.
IMichigan's Brian Block also
placed in the shot put and discus
throw. Block won the shot with a
heave of 49-3, while his discus
throw of 128-5/2 was good enough
for a fifth place. In the lo n g
jump, George Gilchrest captured
a third place with a jump of 22-
0%.3
Michigan placed high in both
relay races it entered. Since many
of the key Michigan runners did
not compete in this meet, due to
illness or injury, many of Michi-
gan's top relay teams could there-
fore not be entered.
In the distance medley, Eastern
Michigan out-kicked the Michigan
foursome in t h e final straight-
away to give a second place to
the Michigan squad. Eastern fin-
ished with a time of 10:06.7, while
Michigan recorded a 10:10.7.

I

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'I ~,7j' ,
'11

ATTENTION ICE CREAM LOVERS!
Our new shipment including your favorites: Carioca
and Rocky Road has just arrived.
COME GET YOUR SHARE
'pe4Ie,'4 33 FLAVORS
ICE CREAM SHOP
at
"THE CORNER"-PACKARD & STATE

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NOW 4 SHOPS
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f- lA PCILICYs
U, each If Vwh i- ecus o~ th~e law of supply and demand-has
caeF Fes for you r gu da'nce.

Society of Automotive Engineers
PROJECT
U-M Student 'Clean-Air' Vehicle
WHEN: Wednesday, 14 APRIL
PLACE: 311 WEST ENGINEERING

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SUNDAY, APRIL 18, 1971
7:30 P.M.
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(on Observatory)

TIME: 7:30 P.M.

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f ULRICH'S needs copies of this
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u nw d n When wea ' "get c aught' with an old edition, let's
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