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April 08, 1971 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-08

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Page Six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, April 8, 1971.

Page Six THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, April 8, 1971

Daily Classifieds

CALLEY TRIAL AFTERMATH

(Continued from Page 5)

PERSONAL

PERSONAL
TRAVELLING THIS SUMMER? - Try
double-knit flare slax from Marty's.
One rinse and they're ready to wear.
Marty's Men's Fashion Clothing, 31Q
.S. State. CFtc
WEDDING INVITATIONS you can dig.
Custom designs. Do your thing and
call 761-0942 anytime. 96F80
FILM ON "CEYLON." Rive Gauche,
9:30 p.m. CF73
WOMEN interested in women's studies
come to a meeting tonight (Thurs.),
8:00 p.m. in the Women's Liberation
Office. 80F73
THERE WILL be a membership meet-
ing Thursday, April 15 at 8:00 to elect
3 members to the Ozone House Board
of Directors. 218 N. Division. 88F73
BOARD EXAMS - Kaplan tutoring
classes now being formed for June
and July. ATGSB EXAMS and July
LSAT EXAM. For information, call
851-6077. 55F80
"Waterbeds can get you through
times of no money better than
money can get you through
times of no waterbeds."
,Love,
Tom and Harry
cFtc
TURN ON TO YOUR MIND.. Biofeed-
back (alpha wave) equipment avail-
able. Explore meditation states and
other altered states of consciousness.
Call John Evans, 769-0868, for more
information. CF80
FLYING TO NEW YORK AFTER
EXAMS?-For schedules, reservations,
youth cards or reduced rate informa-
tion, call Peter Graham, 761-4014.
22F8C
EUROPE $159.00

SUMMER: Detroit Departures
3.15/2 -6/6 Det/Ams/Det.
4. 5/5 -6/25 Det/Ams/Det
5. 5/16-8/16 Det/Ams/Det
6. 6/25-8/29 Det/Ams/Det
6A. 6/26-8/27 Det/Lon/Det
7.7/1 -8/15 Det/Ams/Det
8. S/1 -9/2 Det/Amss/Det

$159
$169
$189
$209
$209
$209
$219

SUMMER: New York Departures
9. 5/28-6/27 NY/Lon/NY $199
10. 7/12-8/1 NY/Ams/NY $209
Also, a Complete Range of Travel
Services: Rail Passes; Car Leases &
Purchases; Motorcycles; Intra-Eu-
ropean 'Charters & Many More.
PLEASE PHONE OR STOP BY AT
EITHER OF OUR TWO OFFICES:
WORLD-WI DE CHARTER
211 South State Street
or
611 Church Street
Ann Arbor, Michigan
Dial: "ON-A-TRIP"
66-2-8747
Open only to U of M students, facul-
try, staff, and immediate families.
MAGIC IS FUN!
You should have a magician at your
next party. Call Bill 764-0731. CFtc
PEOPLE NEEDED for five week Alaskan
summer backpack expedition with ex-
perienced guides. Call John, 663-6036,
or Otis, 663-9283. FD
WHY BUY mass-produced wedding
bands? Have yours personally design-
ed. Order now for summer. Reason-
able prices. Call Jhan, 769-7550 after
4:00. P79
HUNGRY? 3% minute walk from
the Bagel Factory
CARRIAGE HOUSE

Red is a rose,
green is the grass,
you'll feel much better,
with a waterbed under your mass.
Love,
Tom and Harry;
cFtc
WATER BEDS - don't consider this a
fad. Proven to aid the back and aid
the couple. 50 yr. guarantee. All sizes.
Lowest price anywhere. Willing to
make deals on 5 or more. Four Rivers
Co. 769-8235. cFtc
WATERBEDROOMS have lots ofpoten-
tial. Consider, the possibilities at
Wave of the Future Waterbeds. Tom
and Harry discount everything. 214
E. Washington. 769-9020. cFtc
ADVENTURESS
Send $12.95 in' cash silver or gold
buillion to the Wagon Werke along
with your VW and get a spring tune-
up for "cheep." 1245 Rosewood, Ann
.Arbor. 662-2576. 61F78
CAN'T GET IT UP? Maybe you need a
Wave of the Future Waterbed. Re-
sults not guaranteed but lots of fun
trying. See Tom, Harry, and Cathy at
-214 E. Washington for further con-
sultation. 769-9020. cFtc
EXPERI-ENCED SECRETARY desires
work in her home. Thesis, technical
typing, stuffing etc. IBM selectric
Call Jeanette, 971-2463. 12Jtc
SALES CONSULTANT
"PLACING SALESMEN IS OUR
ONLY BUSINESS"
2155 Jackson Rd., Suite 101. 769-8270
Ftc
LIVING on or near campus? Tired of
your old furniture or just can't find
a furnished apt.? Let GLOBE IN-
TERIOR RENTALS help you. Rent
one room of furniture or a houseful!
Coordinate your own ensembles or
rent an entire suite. All rentals with
option to buy, or rent fortwo years
and it's yours! We also rent office
furniture.
Contact Claudia Schaper, our Ann
Arbortrepresentative, anytime at
769-7667 or call collect 313-682-0078,
from 10-6 p.m., Monday-Saturday.
cCtc
CAN YOU BELIEVE IT?
Tom and Harry have sold enough
waterbeds so that they can offer
Kingsize waterbeds for $29. Special
finals sale to brighten those bleak
days. Wave of the Future. 214 E.
Washington, 769-9020. cFtc
REALLY FINE WEDDING PHOTOG-
RAPHY done by a Daily photographer.
Call Jim Judkis, 769-5814. dF76
Richard Lee, Inc.
For simple passports-go to ANY studio.
For photography that 'requires a
Photographer, call 761-9452. CFtc
WRITING A PAPER? Need ideas? See
an UGLI librarian today. Library Re-
source Instruction, 213 Undergraduate
Library. CF79
OVERLAND EXPEDITIONS TO INDIA.
Leave London mid-June. $490. Also
charters to London, approx. $190.
Encounter Overland, International
House, 1414 E. 59th St., Chicago, Ill.
60637. 35F
SITUATIONS WANTED: Parttime or
full-time babysitting. 769-4170. 98F74
IF YOU ARE considering an abortion,
take some time to communicate with
your heavenly father through fasting
and prayer for inspiration to make
the right decision. Phone 764-2004 if
you want to talk things over or need
assistance in prayer. 36F76
BLOW UP YOUR GRANDPA, boyfriend
or pet canary. Giant 2 ft. posters -
anyone or anything. Send any photo
(returned) any size, 2.85 plus .25
postage to Personal Posters, P.O Box
42972, L.A. Calif. 90050. 1074
FRESH LIME, lemon, orange, and palm
trees. Miniatures. Grows live indoors.
761-1932. 761-7764. 93F73
IT'S A WONDER anything this good is
legal. The Four Rivers Company, 769-
8235, dist. for Waterbed Company.
Prices start at $30cn. 9
LEARN THE FACTS before you buy-
there is more to a diamond than
meets the eye. Austin Diamond, 1209
S. University. 663-7151. F
SIERRA CLUB RECOMMENDS
Shacklee products as best for the en-
vironment. Line of organic non-pol-
-luting cleansers includes Basic H
(household cleaner-good for taking
camping too). Laundry stuff, sham-
poo, elec. dishwasher stuff, etc. 769-
4289, 769-7761. DF76
BLOOD DONORS
URGENTLY NEEDED
$7.50 Rh positive, $10 & $12 Rh neg-
ative. Mon., Tues., Tirs., Fri. 9-4.
Wed., 1-7. 18-21 years old need par-
ent's permission.
Michigan Community Blood Center
404 W. Michigan, Ypsilanti
483-!894

By JOHN WHEELER
Associated Press Writer
In the public furor after Lt.
William Calley's murder con-
viction, an often heard cry has
been: "If Calley was guilty at
My Lai, then what of the gen-
erals and colonels above him?"
The question is not new in
warfare or in the tragic story
of My Lai. Charges of attempt-
ed coverup were leveled at sen-
ior officers, not only directly
above Calley but in other units,
soon after news of the massa-
cre broke more than a year ago.
After an exhaustive Army in-
vestigation 14 officers w e r e
charged with dereliction of duty
and other offenses in connec-
tion with alleged failure to re-
port or adequately investigate
the mass murder.
The list was topped by Maj.
Gen. Samuel Koster, Calley's
division commander who return-
ed from Vietnam to become sup-
erintendent at West Point, a
prestigious job the Army often
gives tomen destined for big-
ger things.
The prospect was for public
courts-martial, But then charg-
es of coverup against all t h e
officers except Col. Oran Hen-
derson, Calley's brigade com-
mander, were dismissed "for
lack of evidence." However se-
cret "administrative actions"
were begun and these may cause
Gen. Koster and his deputy,
-Brig. Gen. George Young, to
lose a star each and may ef-'
fectively ruin their military ca-
reers. Other officers, too, a r e
under consideration for similar
action, decided on in secret, for
their acts after the killings at
My Lai.
The Army has shut the door
onpossible public trials or hear-
ings on charges of coverup and
it is not certain whether t h e
voluminous report of the Army
investigation into the matter
will be made public.
A House Armed Services sub-
committee held hearings f o r
seven months on the events at
My Lai and while nearly all-the
evidence still is secret, the
group did publish its conclus-
ions.
Among them: Beginning the
day of the shootings and run-
ning a short time beyond, word
of the slayings was reported, "at
least in part," to numerous sen-
ior officers. These included Cal-
ley's battalion and brigade com-
manders, helicopter unit com-
manders, the division chaplain,
Koster, Young and other divi-
sion staff officers.
Other reports of the massacre
went through the separate U.S.

/l.L G

COi!

intelligence pipe1in e and
through the equally separate
Army advisory network to the
State Department officer who
was provincial senior advisor.
Repeated testimony s h o w e d
Koster had information on the
day it happened that from 20
to 28 civilians had been killed
in My Lai. And when Capt. Ern-
est Medina, Calley's immediate
superior, was ordered back into
the village to investigate t h e
deaths, as U.S. command regu-
lations required, the order was
countermanded by Saber Six.
This was the radio name for
Koster, who was flying by heli-
copter over the operational area.
Later it was said there might
have been tactical reasons for
not returning to My Lai that
day, but the House unit's evi-
dence was that no one return-
ed at all until Washington or-
dered an investigation a year
later based on hearsay reports
from an ex-GI, Ronald Riden-
hour of Phoenix, Ariz.
"The most damning evidence
that there was a conscious ef-
fort to suppress evidence was
the disappearance of documents
from the files of U.S. organiza-
tions between early 1968 and
mid-1969," the House panel's re-
port said.
Of six documents the c o n-
gressman said related to the in-
vestigation, only one copy of
one of the least important sur-
vived. This was a report by the
brigade commander, Henderson,
to Koster giving the. number of
civilian casualties at about 20
and saying these were due to ar-
tillary, gunships and cross-fire
on the ground. Henderson is be-
ing court-martialled on charges
of dereliction of duty, failure to
obey lawful regulations, making
false official statements a n d
false swearing.
Officers called to testify quot-
ed Gen. Young and another divi-
sion staff officer as saying,
"That's murder," when told of
the My Lai details shortly after
the killings. Koster was quoted
by one witness as saying an oral
report blaming all known deaths
on artillery and helicopter fire
was "unacceptable."
As further proof that sen-
ior officers knew possible war
crimes had been committed, the
congressmen said, officers and
enlisted men in the division

er up4
were 'i'nformed directly or in-
directly that the My Lai opera-
tion was being investigated and
therefore were instructed t h a t
they should not speculate on or
discuss the matter pending com-
pletion of the investigation."
In a slap at top Army brass,
the subcommittee also said:
"From its inception the subcom-
mittee's investigation has been
hampered by a generally unco-
operative attitude of the De-
partment of the Army."
Commenting on the Army's
switch from the courts-martial
to secret administrative actions,
Rep. Samuel Stratton, a hawkish
member of the staunchly p r o-
military House Armed Services
Committee, said, "The A r m y
now is involved in a coverup of
the coverup." Stratton, a New
York Democrat, was one of four
members of the subcommittee
that investigated My Lai.
Robert MacCrate, a Wall
Street lawyer who was special
counsel on the select panel
which investigated My Lai for
the Army, said he was "shock-
ed" that charges against Koster
were dropped. He added that
the action "effectively cut off
the orderly progress of inquiry
tip the chain of command."
A senior aide to Army Chief
of Staff Gen. William West-
moreland said the Army report
establishes that senior offi-
cers had lied. He said the troub-
le was establishing who lied
about what since there was so
much conflicting testimony.
Stratton called for a rein-
statement of charges. But a sen-
ior Army legal expert said in
nearly all cases this was impos-
sible since the statute of limi-
tations on suchi charges had run
out.
Stratton says while the origi-
nal "suppression" of My L a i
events may have involved only
officers in that region of Viet-
SALE ON
SHERWOOD
PRODUCTS
at
HI FI STUDIO
121 W. WASHINGTON
Downtown across from
Old German Rest.
NO 8-7942

nam, the decisions to prevent
embarrassing courts-martial of
senior officers can be traced to
top brass in the Pentagon.
A spokesman for the West-
moreland denied that West-
moreland had ordered or influ-
enced Army officials who decide
to drop courts-martial charges.
Westmoreland did, however, re-
commend the still-pending ad-
ministrative actions a g a i n s t
Koster and Young, according to
reliable Department of Defense
sources.
Koster so far has declined all
comment on either action.
Young said he feels "like a poli-
tical scapegoat" since the ad-
ministrative action came about
six months after the original
charges were dropped.
Capt. Medina is facing murder
charges. In all the ranks above
his the charges involved the al-
leged coverup and not respon-
sibility for the killings at My
Lai. Another Captain, Eugene
Kotouc, faces court-martian on
charges of maiming and assault-
ing an unidentified Vietnamese.
He was assigned to interrogate
suspected enemy during the My
Lai assault.I
With the nation's entire de-
fense establishment under heavy
pressure due to the Vietnam war
and other issues, the My Lai is-
sue could not have come at a
worse time for the Army. One
of Westmoreland's aides said,
"I think it is a tribute to the
Army that it has followed
through aggressively on the
murder charges no matter what
it does to our public image."
Westmoreland, in person and
by regulation, had tried from
the onset of U.S. participation
in the war to make it clear that
unnecessary civilian casualties
were intolerable.
Stratton and some others, in-

Who s

at

cluding a few in the military,
view the handling of Koster's
case as the clearest evidence
that the Army has changed its
mind on how best to deal with
the aftermath of My Lai.
When Lt. Gen. Jonathan Sea-
man, as immediate commander of
the accused at Ft. Meade, Md.,
dismissed court-martial charg-
es against Koster Seaman said
he "did not know any inten-
tional abrogation of responsibil-
ities" in the My Lai affair. The
charges against Koster involved
regulations which required
prompt reporting of even su-
spected war crimes and civilian
deaths to higher headquarters
and then launching an investi-
gation of his own.
After Stratton charged that
the dismissal amounted to a
whitewash, the Army said Kos-
ter had been censured by Sea-
man and would, together with
other officers, face possible fur-
ther administrative action. The
Army says the months-long de--
lay in announcing the kFensure
was due to a "public relations
blunder."
In announcing the action, a
spokesman said, "The general
tenor of the censure letter was
to censure Gen. Koster for his
failure to report civilian casual-
ties and to insure that the cirr
cumstances of those casualties
were investigated promptly and
thoroughly." The letter of cen-
sure was, followed by an an-
nouncement that the -Army has

TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION
as taught by
Maharishi
Mahesh
Yogi

rauIt?
recommended to the secretary
of the Army that Koster and his
deputy, Young, be demoted one
rank and officially reprimanded.
Stratton said of the admin-
istrative actions, "If they (the
Army) had all the evidence for
that, then why didn't the
courts-martial go forward?" He
added the latest actions w e r e
taken only "because the Army
now knows that it made a hor-
rible mistake in court-martialing
enlisted men and lieutenants in
the My Lai case and letting old
generals go free."
Westmoreland said last week,
"No, I feel no guilt, not in the
least," about My Lai. He added,
"You cannot compare my role
and conduct ... in Vietnam with
that of Gen. Yamashita." Tomo-
yuki Yamashita was hanged for
atrocities Japanese troops com-
mitted in the Phillipines during
World War II even though he
had not ordered them and was
said to have no personal knowl-
edge they had occurred.
On the alleged coverup, West-
moreland earlier told congress-
men, "Well, this is absolutely
unexplainable to me."
Stratton believes it must be
explained, publicly' "I support
the Army," he said in an inter-
view. "If I am a hawk, I am an
honest hawk. The Army has to
have the public confidence that
the truth about My Lai, all the
truth, has come out.
"It has not."
;% <:'o',: }' y'.r:ti-i;vr r:?":"io,..'.vii v Q

ITT

A professional
ABORTION
that is safe,
legal &
inexpensive
can be set up on an
outpatient basis by calling
The Problem Pregnancy
Referral Service
215-722-5360
24 HOURS-7 DAYS
for professional, confidential
and caring help

eous tech-
mind and
E
Aud. B
Apr il8

Transcendental meditation is a natural spontan
nique which allows each individual to expand his
improve his life.
INTRODUCTORY LECT URi

III

I

An gell Hall
8:00 P.M.

Thursday,,

1224 Washtenaw
665-8825

F

INTERESTED IN WORK OR STUDY
ABROAD? CALL EVE, 769-4925. 41F74
CUSTOM SANDALS
We Mak'e and Guarantee for 2 Yrs.
Fine Handmade Sandals in 20 Styles
CALL 662-6845
HIDE-OUT, 343 Maynard St.
Come On In
86F90
ATTENTION - Pinball freaks, the Wiz-
ard has come to Mark's Coffee House
(605 E. William) bringing a room
full of pinballs. DF70
DEAR MILDRED
Go to the Wagon Werke at once. I just
traded 75 lb. of brown rice for a
spring tune-up worth $12.95. It's just
off Industrial Hwy. in Ann Arbor,
1245 Rosewood, phone 662-2576. 59F78
GOING TO EUROPE? Girl needs tra-
vel companion May-June. Call 764-
7618. 79F73
FREE Computer Dating information.
Send name, address to Data-Mate,
1324 CD Commerce Center, Lansing.
99F80
RIDE NEEDED to Washington, D.C.
anytime after 6 p.m. on Tuesday,
April 27. Will share driving, expenses.
Please call Harry at 764-9833. DF76

For the student body:
LEVI'S
CORDUROY
Slim Fits ......$6.98
(All Colors)

Up Against the Wall Street Journal
FORUM
for political discussion on
Organizing the University

DAILY CLASSIFIEDS BRING RESULTS--USETHEM

1.!

I

Bells

$8.50

DENIM
Bush Jeans
Bells..-.+
Pre-Shrunk
Super Slims.

$10.00
$8.00
$7.50
$7.00

Thurs., April 8

37:30 p.m.

State Street at Liberty

East Quad, Room 126
TON IGHT

Ftc :

I

1
MMMMMMMomn

I

Come experience
THE CRUCIFIXION OF CHRIST
through
CONTEMPORARY LITURGY
and modern media
on GOOD FRIDAY EVENING
April 9, 1971-7:30 to 8:30 P.M.
at
FIRST UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
STATE ST. AT HURON
A special event to which the public is cordially invited

SBICCA
Summer's grand opening

LETS YOU WIGGLE YOUR TOES ... WITH CLASS
... at the Shack. Our stocks are complete with the

area's largest sandal selection. Try us first, or try us last . .. but try us!

f I - ---s^-

_.___. :_r._'

make your move in
polyester knit
flares. . .the pants
that give you the
ultimate in freedom,
comfort, ease of
care and shape
retention. Blue or
camel. 29 to 36
waist sizes. $11.

I

r

Exploring Theological Education:
A Conference for Students Considering Seminary
SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 9:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m.
AT
The Center for United Ministries in Higher Education
MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY
1118 S. Harrison, East Lansing, Michigan

. ,--
"A llI

M...i..........y

11

I

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