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April 04, 1971 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, April 4, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Sundav.ADriI4. 1971

.. I,. ..~ + .r

I

A struggle
By BETH FITTS not rE
Art today has grown and de- riety
veloped strength since its unity all ar
in Greek culture. Today art has The
diversified so that no one per. arate
son or group can embrace it all is beg
despite the efforts at "multi- today
h media" approach. that
To many people in -our cul- mover
ture, Dance is a mystic stranger, physi
remote a n d unapproachable. press
There are those that are dance moves
enthusiasts, that religiously at- them
tend the openings yet the ma- notg
> { --I jority of Americans lack even concu
such an esoteric connection. We growt
view dance in the artificial set- ly in
ting of the theatre rather than as pa
through the natural participa- come
tion of ethnic dance and the in- corpo
tegration of dance with art and has s
daily life. tion.
The arts have become divorc- The
ed from the natural routine of a visa
our lives. The aims and spirit of in ou:
artistic creation seem to us to ulatio
be extraordinary rather t h a n tente
the basic human reaction to life tiona
around us. The artist is conceiv- unres
ed as the abnormal child of our the ii
society we do not know quite of a v
Daily-Terry McCarthy what to do with him. We have being
Contepmporary

for

recogn ition

LIFE AND DEATH
a contemporary Lenten morality ploy
by DONALD H. POSTEMA
an original multi-media production
SUNDAY, APRIL 4, 6:30 p.m.

ealized that despite the va-
of our occupations, we are
rtists.
e myth that dance is sep-
from the individual's life,
ginning to dissolve as youth
is critically viewing all
influences life. There- are
;ments for peace, ecology
cal fitness, and self-ex-
ion. These are not n e w
;ments but the force behind
is new and vital. What is
generally realized is that
urrently there is a surging
th in the arts and especial-
dance. While other arts
inting and music have be-
generally accepted and in-
rated in our society, dance
truggled for open recogni-
e University community is
able example of new trends
r society. The student pop-
on is infected with discon-
and confusion. The educa-
l framework is considered
ponsive to the demands of
ndividual, immediate view
world in crisis. Changes are
made, there are fewer re-

strictions, more room for self-
determination, new courses, and
a breaking down of the arbi-
trary distinctions between fields.
But one aspect remains unchang-
ed. University education is sch-
olarly and remote from the rel-
evance of the total student -
mind, body and environment..
Dance is filling a gap at The
University as more and more
students turn toward it as an
approach to life. They are find-
ing a reality and enjoyment in
dance that enhances other dis-
ciplines. The University of Mich-
igan has a small but growing
dance division under the de-
partment of Physical Educa-
tion. The University offers a
dance major, as well as courses
in Ballet, Modern, and Ethnic
dance in the elective program.
Attendance in these programs
has grown to overflowing. Sev-
eral students have switched
their majors from other fields
to either a dance major or a
combined program concentrat-
ing in dance. It is students such
as these who indicate a general
trend toward participation in

dance and its approach to life.
Students a n d faculty of
Dance at T h e University of
Michigan are actively involved
in creating dance. This spring
they are working on the Twenty-
first Annual Spring Dance Con-
cert. The Concert is primarily a
student production with dance
providing guidance and s o m e
choreography. The dances in-
cluded are varied and each is a
unique presentation. Treat, a
student choreographed duet, is
a combination of modern dance
and modern jazz. In contrast to
this duet is Vera Embree's rous-
ing Ritual One. This faculty
work is an American choreogra-
pher's version or an African
ritual. Based on African dance
tradition, this is a prayer to the
Supreme Being for fecundity. It
involves a priest and priestess
with male and female attend-
ants, and a large group of danc-
ers representing villagers.
The Concert is sponsored
through the Concert Dance Or-
ganization and the Department
of Physical Education of the
University of Michigan.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Washtenaw at Forest
662-2402

i
r

_____ _. __ _ ._ .. _.._ . m._. _ ..____

.q

I.

PRESENTS
LEN CHANDLER
COLUMBIA RECORDING ARTIST
TONIGHT
IT $2.00 Doors Open 8 p.m.
DOT$330 Maynard St.
E

II

xl

originality

By JOE PEHRSON
Despite an enthusiastic audi-
ence, and one of the largest audi-
:ences thatvhas recently appear-
ed for a concert of contempor-
ary music, the presentation by
the . composers Robert Boury,
-Kurt Carpenter and Russell Peck
(Pork) seemed generally marked
by a lack of enthusiasm.
Material from other corinpos-
ers who have little university out-
let, was presented (George Caci-
..oppo and Terry Kincaid fall into
this category) but most of the
-material on this program con-
sisted of compositions by the
three composers themselves.
The first piece on the program,
"Kelp" by Terry Kincaid was
marred by the inclusion of too
many repetitive materials. In
particular, one tone that Terry
undoubtedly considers a center
of organization for the piece
seems somewhat annoying. Near
the conclusion, voice is added,
subject to. a degree of electronic
modulation. I don't believe this
is as subtle as it could be.
One of . the more interesting
pieces on the program was the
presentation of "Excerpts from
Apteryx .,Papers" by George
Cacioppo. Cacioppo's piece con-
sisted essentially of an oral lec-
ture. .on contemporary music,
.reminiscent of some of the lec-
tures that Cage has been co nsist-
ently givingin this country. The
,background was formed of wide-
ly-spaced, electronic sounds ap-
parently composed by aleatoric
means and T must admit ITcon-
sider the sound of Cacioppo's
voice as beautiful as any of these
gentle sounds.. This was really
pleasant listening.
Kurt Carpenter's "First Coine"
premiered at the, Strata gallery
in Detroit was played again by
the composer at this perform-
ance. .For some reason (I hose
not second hearing) I did tot cen-
sider this, piece as congruent as
tle performance at the Strata.
Perhaps this was due to prob-
lems in performance. Carpenter's
piano -work was not equal to his
general quality. The piece seem-
Ed somewhatdistended and some
parts near the beginning seem
to have been changed and not
for the better (this again may be
only performance).,
"Time Being' by Russell Peck
is a piece for violin and pre-re-
corded violin. Some parts of this
piece are interesting but I tire

quickly of the constant use .A
glissando at the beginning and
the inclusion of popular elements
"Turkey and the Straw etc."
near the center section. To this
piece was placed a dance per-
formance by Linda Ellis. Linda's
work is very good and often the
combination of her live dance
patterns with patterns that had
been previously filmed was in-
teresting to watch. I believe some
of the elements are toa familiar
(the placement of Linda's body
over the previously filmed body
form and subsequent shift of the.
live form to another area leav-
ing a shadow serves as example
of this).
"Suspended Sentence", first
performed at the recent Com-
poser's Forum, was performed
again last night. Peck's piece
must be performed spectacul.arly
-I believe there is some connec-
tion between this piece and the
theatrical works of Robert Ash-
leyalthough this is Ashley ex-
trapollated, taken to a cifferant
intellectual level. Caipenter's
performance did not display this
piece this time and some of the
more spectacular elements (in-
cluding the final keyboard clus-
ter)sdid not make the theatrical
sense that they must'. I realize
that my evaluation of this piece
has rested somewhat of my dis-
agreement with the clusters
which I believe make a too fre-
qu~ent and too unsubtle appeal -
ance. Attempting to forget these
during this performance made
some of Peck's phrases much
clearer.
"Wall to Wall" a descriptive
title for a piece by Carpenter
that places two performers at
opposite ends cf the stage (flute
and violin) with organizational
center consisting of the vibra-
phone placed center stage, is very
pleasant. Althougn the piece :s
seemingly simple, the sonor-
VWriter-In-,
pre
GARY
March 29t

ties are well chosen and the gen-
eral impression is one of solidi-
ty. This rivals "Heart of Dark-
ness" in continuity of language
and I personally believe the use
of these sounds creates a lan-
guage that is more mature.
"Honk" by Robert Boury was
presented for the hundredth time.
Boury has certainly mnade much
mileage from this material. The
performance was much better
than anything I have seen him
do (far surpassing 'he unsure
bulkiness of the "Varsity Rags"
performance) and it as nice to
hear this piece finally with the
tape balance correct. "Honk"
seems to be much less sophisti-
cated near the conclusion ar.d
seems to sacrifice refinement for
display.
TONIGHT ONLY!

"Informed Sources" by Caci-
oppo formed the basis for a
dance by Linda Ellis and John
Cwiakala. Carpenter and Peck
interpreted the Cacioppo work on
piano-the performance is some-
what indeterminate of perform-
ance-and sometimes the' styl-
istics, while sensible, seem to be
much different from the music
Cacioppo (from examination of
the score) seems to suggest by
the visual composition.
I cannot understand why Linda

ever decided to dance with Cwia-
kala. Unfortunately, much of my
attention was directed to the
differences in quality of inter-
pretation by the two dancers.
This was hardly to be helped. At
almost every instant The motions
of one of the two dancers was
identical to the motions of the
other. It was not possible, in
this situation to avoid a com-
parison. Linda's motions were
extremely subtle and her attitude
is delightful to watch.

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DOUB LE F E ATUR E-L AS T 3 D AY S

FOR LAUGHING OUT LOUD!
Georges Feydeau
The Girl from ,Maxims
at 8 P.M.-Wednesday-Saturday-April 7-10
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE-Box Office Opens 12:30-668-6300
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN PLAYERS
$2.50 TOP!--OPENS WEDN ESDAY-TICKETS NOW!

,1.

Jack Lemmon and
Catherine Deneuve
are
The April Fools"
Technicolor'
A Cinema Center Films Presentation.
A National General Pictures Release.
Aud. A, Angell Hall
Shown at 7, 8:45
and 10:30 P.M.

II

HOPWOOD LECTURE
TED SOLOTAROFF
Critic and editor. Former editor of COMMENTARY
BOOK WEEK. Presently editor of NEW AMERICAN,
VIEW. Author of THE RED HOT VACUUM.

and
RE-

V

The Practical Critic:
A Personal View

I

-Residence
.sents
SNYDER

Announcement of the Hopwood Awards for 1971
will follow the lecture
wednesday, april 7,8 p.m.
rackham lecture hail

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE
"Best Foreign Film"

"Without ever showing all -
there is to show, without
pandering to the prurient
and the obvious, 'First Love' S
becomes through artistry and
intelligent use of sensuality, FIRST LJJVE
ONE OF THE SEXIEST MOV-
IES IN YEARS!"
-Rex Reed (Cannes Film Festival)
"INCREDIBLY SENSUAL!"
--N.Y. Times
An extraordinarily
beautiful film!"
-Wolf, Cue Magazine
RESTRICTED
Sun.-'First Love'-3:20, 6:30, 9:40-'Quackser'-5:00, 8:10
Monday-'First Love'-6:30, 9:40-'Quackser'-8:10
"ONE OF THE MOST DELIGHTFUL
COMIC DRAMS OF

Open to the public

N

. !

I

SOME NEWS THE DAILY DIDN'T SEE FIT TO PRINT:
Last Sunday night, March 28, University of Michigan Film Society (ARM) had
scheduled a screening of Marcel Camus' romantic classic CHILDREN OF PARADISE
in Natural Science Auditorium.
When we arrived to set up, we found the auditorium's permanent screen blocked
by one of the moveable blackboards. It had been raised to midscreen and jammed there,
both mechanically and electrically. Writtn across the blackboard in red, white and blue
chalk was the legend: "Sorry, compliments of DisARM." We ended by projecting on
one of the' slanting side walls of the auditorium, and the audience seemed sympathetic
and patient with us.
We called the DAILY for coverage of the incident, and spoke with Tammy
Jacobs. She couldn't "promise a thing," but after a couple of hours, a photographer
showed up to take a picture of the jammed blackboard. FULL STOP. No photo, no
coverage appeared in the DAILY.
We weren't surprised. We had had a lot of trouble dealing with the DAILY's
pretenses at liberal "objectivity" before, when two weeks ago, DisARM placed a false
cancellation of another screening and the DAILY carried it.
At that time, the most the DAILY would do was carry a "guest editorial" explain-
ing our "side" of these Rightwing attacks, under the head "False Advertising: Weapon
Against ARM?" Yet, there was no "question" about the DAILY's accepting and carry-
ing false advertising. As there is no question that the DAILY has yet to carry a several-
times promised correction and explanation of its action.
Now, the DAILY has refused to cover a legitimate news story, involving the
destruction of University property. Probably for "lack of space."
For reasons we have never been able to understand, the DAILY is still respected

R

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