100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 03, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight
NEW GOVERNMEN'T APPROVED:
Power struggle devel
continues to claim. le

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, April 3, 1971

(Continued from page 1) 1
has no jurisdiction over Graduate
Assembly.
John Berg, vice president of As-
sembly, says GA will continue to
function despite CSJ's ruling. "Es-
sentially, we're going to act as if
the ruling doesn't exist," Berg
says.
"CSJ has no control over us
and no legal power to enforce
their decision," he further claims.
CSJ also ruled that money cur-
rently in GA's possession cannot
be spent without the approval of
Larry Klein, chairman of CSJ.
According to Klein, the money
is currently being withheld from
Assembly. "I spoke to Maurice
Rinkel (auditor for student organ-
izations) and he won't let any
money out until he hears from
Stephen Spurr, dean of the grad-
uate school."
Klein expressed confidence that
Spurr will comply with CSJ's rul-
ing.
Graduate Assembly's main ob-
jection to the new Rackham gov-
ernment, according to Berg, is the
council's constitution. Assembly
charges the constitution with pro-:

viding a "cumbersome and power-
centered government," giving the
executive body of' the three-body
government too powerful a role.
Berg also contends that because
"so few graduate students voted
for the government," the new
council lacks credibility with the
graduate students and the Uni-
versity administration.
"Any government hoping to ef-
fectively deal with the adminis-
tration would have to have more
support," Berg says. "I don't see
they're going to pull a whole lot
of weight with that turnout."
Berg stresses that GA's objec-
tion to the Rackham government
"is not the people," but the for-
mat of the constitution.
While Graduate Assembly claims
to be the legitimate voice of grad-
uate students, Fox asserts that in
the recent election, "GA has been
largely discredited."
"The graduate students were
asked to either support the con-
tinuation of Graduate Assembly
or vote in a new government," Fox
says. "They voted for us and we
have to abide by the decision they
made."

Budget crisi1s drawsca dat s ate io
candidate aento

[ops as GA
In an effort to resolve the con-
flict between the two graduate
governments, officers of both
groups plan to meet next Tuesday
to discuss settling their disagree-
ments.
Although Fox hopes Graduate
Assembly will agree to merge in-
to the Rackham government, Berg
says the Assembly "is not pre-
pared to become a part of the
Rackham government."
The Rackham government of-
ficers have already started moving
t o w a r d s legitimizing the new
council "in the eyes of the faculty
and administration," Fox says.'
Rackham officers are currently
making appointments with the
University's vice presidents to
discuss appointing graduate stu-
dents to sit on administrative
committees.'
"One importantcommittee we
hope to gain representation on,"
says Fox, "is the search committee
for the new dean of the graduate
school."
Another area in which t h e
Rackham government is involv-
ed, focuses around the economic
status of graduate students. Many
of the Rackham government can-
didates actively participated in an
ad hoc group formed last month
to protect economic interests of
graduate students.
The ad-hoc group - the Grad-
uate Assistants' Coordinating
Committee (GACC) organized
against a proposal by Vice Presi-
dent for Academic Affairs Allan
Smith to standardize the defin-
ition of a graduate assistant.
Members of GACC and the Rack-
ham government contend that
Smith's proposal impairs the eco-
nomic status of graduate stu-
dents by cutting needed insurance
benefits and restricting the length
of graduate student appoint-
mentss.
According to Fox, the commit-
tee was able to get Smith to agree
to extend health Insurance cov-
erage.
I s 0llLVI.
New From Levi !
For the Student Body:
Boot Jeans
$7.50
PR E-SH RUN K

(Continued from page 1)
crimination, did not see the goals
until after they were sumitted to
HEW.
However, the commission is now
planning a review of the goals.
As part of the initial investiga-
tion, commission Chairwoman Bar-
bara Newell, also an assistant to
President Fleming, corresponded
with Bernice Sandler of the Wom-
en's . Equity Action L e a g u e
(WEAL), a national organization
which has been working with HEW
on contract compliance cases.
Sandler sent the commission
WEAL's portion of the analysis of
the University's plan. Figures in
the analysis compare the Univer-
sity's 1973-74 goal of having 6.6 per
cent female professors to the cur-
rent national percentage of 8.7 per
cent.
It also shows that the Univer-
sity's 13.9 per cent goal for female
associate professors in 1973-74 is
below the current national figure
of 15.1 per cent.
Even if the University does attain
its goals for instructional staff, ac-
cording to WEAL analysis, its 1973-
74 percentage of women will be
only 16 per cent as opposed to a
19 per cent current national figure.
A footnote to the analysis states
"after four years, the percentage
of women at the University" at the
professor and associate professor
level "would still be below that of
the current national figures."
Noting the WEAL analysis, New-
ell says she expects the Univer-
Even bathing every day
can't stop it.
Feminine odor starts inter-
nally, and no amount of bath-
ing can remove it. Soap and
water simply can't reach the
area where the odor starts.
That's the reason you need
Norforms'. the second deodor-
ant These tiny internal sup-
positories kill germs-stop odor
effectively yet safely. In fact, gen-
tle, dodtor-tested Norforms are
so safe and easy to use, you can
use them as often as necessary.
No bath or shower can give
you Norforms' protection. Get
Norforms, and you'll feel se-
cure and odorfree for hours.
The second deodorant.
r FREE NORFORMS MINI-PACK 1
i pus informative booklet Write:
' Norwich Pharmacal C., Dept. CN,'
Norwich, N.Y., 13815. (Enclose 25
for mailing, handling.)
IName I
I Street
City
SSate, y ip
Don forcer ur :in code.
-27

sity's plan to be unacceptable to
HEW.
Assuming that HEW does reject
the plan, the commission would
have a major role in forming new
recommendations, according to
Newell, "both in terms of format
and of the review process itself."
Fedele Fauri, vice-president for
state relations, designated to work
with the commission, agrees, say-
ing "we would welcome the com-
mission's recommendations," and
adding that "a great deal" of such
a .review "would be up to them."
He adds that it was "merely a
question of time" that prevented
the commission from reviewing the
original goals.
Commission members plan to di-
vide into small sub-committees to
review data from different "em-
ploying units" of the University.
Each sub-committee will probably
include non-commission members
from that particular group of em-
ploying units.
In answer to charges that the
goals are "totally inadequate,"
Fauri points out that the goals
"had to be set at a time when we
were decreasing rather than in-
creasing employment."

HEW studies 'U' plan

Close city
(Continued from page 1)
in four of the five races as well as
the mayoral race to merely main-
tain their present tenuous hold on
the city.
To maintain any semblance of
power, the Democrats would have
to win the mayoral race along
with at least two of the council
races in order to prevent the may-
or's veto power from being over-
ridden.
A Republican gain of only one
seat could tip the balance to a
Republican m a j o r i t y while a
strong showing such as they had
in last year's council elections
would give them the votes neces-
sary to override the mayor's veto
-negating the effect of a possible
Harris victory.
Ann A r b o r Republican Party
Chairman Harry Aquinto refused
comment on the council races
other than to say he felt the Re-
publicans would win all five races.
Leading Democrats are general-
ly pessimistic concerning the
party's chances to retain control
of the council and view their main
goal as electing Harris and keep-
ing the necessary votes to sustain
the mayor's veto.

election anticipated

In one traditionally Democratic
stronghold'- the Second Ward -'
which includes most of the Uni-
;versity student community, party
leaders are expressing concern
over the campaign of Democratic
incumbent Robert Faber.
They fear the write-in campaign
of Radical Independent Party can-'
didate Jerry DeGrieck will take1
student votes away from Faber
and could have the result of
bringing about the election of the
Republican candidate Donald Rob-
inson.1
The Radical Independent Party
on the other hand claims DeGrieck
has a good chance of actually win-
ning the race and is encouraging
voters to support him rather than
casting their vote for Faber to
prevent Robinson's election.
When questioned about the ef-
fect he felt DeGrieck's campaign
had on the chances of Robinson,
Aquinto claimed he had never
heard of either DeGrieck or the1
Radical Independent Party. 1
Democrats view the Secondz
Ward as pivotal because maintain-i
ing the mayor's power to veto re-t
quires winning this seat as well asc

the First Ward seat of long time
Democrat H. C. Curry - which
most experts feel is likely.
The rest of the council outlook
is dim for the Democrats.
Little hope is held out for gain-
ing the seat of retiring Republican
councilman Roy Weber in the
Fourth Ward or of maintaining
the seat of retiring Democrat
Henry Stadler in the fifth. Both
wards are generally considered to
be Republican strongholds.
The Third Ward election be-
tween Democrat Nelson Meade
and Republican Peter Wright is
seen as some what more hopeful
for the Democrats; however, the
odds still favor the Republicans.
Despite rifts with the party's
moderate wing headed by Robert
Weaver (R-Second Ward), party
leaders are, confident of consoli-
dating conservative dissatisfaction
with the Harris administration in-
to a victory atthe polls.
The Democrats on the other
hand are hoping to hold on to at
least a veto in the government if
not their control over council, pin-
ning their hopes on strong efforts
to effect a large turnout of the
city's Democratic voters.

i ,

IONDAY BALLOTING:

I

When
thisS

I

you

leavye

A2

(Continued from page 1)
Although it is not yet clear
whether the cut will be made (ne-
gotiations are underway), the city
budget must contain contingen-
cy plans to deal with the cut.
Altogether, the two represent a
total of around $2 million that the
city will not have next year -
about 20 per cent of the city's $10
million budget.
Since services were cut back in
last year's budget to a lower level
than the city has been accustom-
ed to, another budget paring will
plunge services to a still lower
level.
Department expenditures were
sliced' last year too. The public
Safety Department, which includ-
es the police and fire department,
had their requests chopped in
half.
The Human Rights Department
had funds slashed, as did t h e
Housing Commission and . t h e
Parks and Recreation Depart-
ment. Subsidy payments to the
Ann Arbor Transportation Au-
thority were reduced.
In addition, the city had to use
the last of a $1.5 million surplus
left over from 1960 to balance
the budget this year. Even if serv-
Ices stay at the same level next
year, there will be a $1 million
deficit and no surplus to bail out
the budget.
Thus, the city must either cut
services and slice department ex-
penditures further pr find a source
of additional revenue.
Since passage of an income tax
would require abolishing the 7.5
mill property tax (a requirement
which city voters approved in Nov.
'69), the income tax would re-
place the revenue raised by the
property tax and generate $1 mil-
ion extra.
Harris, advocating passage of a
city income tax, says a flat one
per cent tax would generate some
$1 million.
SALE ON
CONCORD
PRODUCTS
atI
HI FI STUDIO
121 W. WASHINGTON

Cornell supports a city income
tax too, but opposes the flat-rate
type.
"RIP is against the present tax
structure in which the burden is
placed on the small property own-
er," Cornell says, "We favor a
highly progressive, graduated in-
come tax."
Such a tax, which Cornell main-
tains would divert the tax burden
to the wealthy instead of the poor,
would require a change in state
law.
Cornell would have the c i t y
lobby to change the state 1 a w
and push for tax changes thatf
would "shift the burden to cor-
porations and businesses."
Garris favors a flat-rate city
income tax, but emphasizes an ac-
companying "fiscal responsibility
and credibility."
"A income tax is a fair way of
raising revenue for city opera-'
tions," Garris says. "Ultimately we
hope to arrive at a level of city
income tax that can pay for city
operations and the property tax
could then be eliminated."
M-PIN BOWLING
1 P.M.-Mid.
SU NDAY

ummer

'EN

CHECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

9

- STRATA PRESENTS -

THE CECIL TAYLOR UNIT

.........._..

CECIL TAYLOR-Piano
SAM RIVERS-Sax
ANDREW LYRILLE-Drums
ALAN SILVA-(Bass
APRIL 2-4
Fri., Sat.-9:30-2 a.m.
Sunday - 6-10 p.m.
NO AGE LIMIT
Admission $3.75
Strata Concert-Gallery
2554 MICHIGAN AVENUE
(near 17th in Detroit)

WRITE IN

Jerry DE GRIECK
2nd Ward
Doug CORNELL
Mayor
MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT
Vote R1IP - Monday, April 5

C

I

r

s"L'S+: Pir:":"::"::4":fi::":+; {Ct }:":"i:.>?y. .". .;{r:{.};,;."{:.::".v: ".:::::.: ::. .{ .^ :".v:::. :x:: ^::::.":::::.v .".

PA

SSOVER IS COMING!

s r' ,a_.. ,_..

The First Seder--Friday night, April 9
Reservations for seders, luncheon and dinner meals may be
made at the Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill St. thru Tuesday
afternoon, April 6. No reservations thereafter.
HAPPY PASSOVER!

(55 ,
II
I/

A

Don't leave I~tfrii4ibehind!

+?}f:i-::r}. :.1vri{:= ':'~it .:: :4 .'a

Writer-In-Residence
presents
GARY SNYDER
March 29 thru April 4

SUBSCRIBE TO:

ONLY

(Summer)

am ................m -mm CLIP AND MAIL .....-....m......mmy
r r
f Order your SUIMMER subscription now!
* $3.00 Spring (I Ila) OR Summer (111b) Half Termr
r $5.00 Spring-Summer (111) Term
r r
r r
j(Please Print) Last Name First Name Middle Initial
r r
Phone _________
r r

mtrbt - 019 tn

During the week Snyder will read his poetry and

i

II

HaS iel Envi HorowitzI* t.E n Cr lEi U 11 *k - lUy Aniew C k -thd,' 1 V.I

I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan