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April 01, 1971 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-04-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Twelve

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, April 1,1971

i i t

U.S. high schools face disturbances

By The Associated Press
Recent disturbances at a num-
ber of Detroit high schools are
indicative of the widespread un-
rest that is gripping high schools
across the country.
The pupil turmoil in many of
the nation's public high schools
-brawling, stabbings, assaults
and arson-in most cases is laced
with racial overtones.
Many, schoolradministrators,
teachers and parents als. i di.
cate there are numerous ist aes
which, along with racism, contri-
bute to the unrest, a survey by
The Associated Press shows.
Among factors they cited:
-Deteriorating p u p i l disci-
pline;-
-Poor communications among
pupils, parents, teachers and ad-
ministrators; and
-School curricula which ne-
glect the pupil.
"It's just authority they re-
sent," said Dorothy L. Burress of
some pupils at Washington High
School in Milwaukee, Wis., where
there has been sporadic brawl
ing and vandalism. The situation
at that school is similar to that
at many of the nation's high
schools.
"It's not a racial thing," added
Burress, a black gym teacher.
She said white teachers were
afraid to apply the same stand-
ards to black and white alike.
"So the blacks get away with it,"
she claimed.
On April 5, 1969, the first anji-
versary of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.'s assassination, 150
black pupils staged a silent
m a r c h through Washington's
halls. This was followed by a per-
iod of almost daily fires in lockers
and waste paper baskets and fre-
quent fighting between blacks
and whites. I
The big blow-up came in No-
vember 1969 and was marked by
three days of fist fighting and a
black pupil raid on the cafeteria.
There were three more days of
trouble in February of this year.
It was triggered when a scuffle
broke out between a black girl
pupil and a white teacher in a
hall.
From this emerged the Parent
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from page 9)
General Notices
Application for Grad Student Disser-
tation Grants: may be made through
closing date of Apr. 9; late applies, not
accepted; students expected to have
Sclear statement of research prob. to-
gether with estimated cost of ea. major
expenditure connected with it; pro-
ject should have been reviewed by
members of doctoral comm.; format for
submission can be obtained in Fel-
lowship Ofc., Rackham Bldg., Rm. 1014;
info at 4-2218.
Placement
SUMMER PLACEMENT
Announcements: for details call 764-
7460.
Maria Mitchell Assoc., R.I., assistant
to teach adult botany classes, and a

Teacher - Student Organization
headed by the Rev. Paul W. Lar-
son, a Congregational minister
who advocates "parent power."
Larson said the administration
needs to deal directly with the
cause of all unresteatthe school.
"I mean the youngsters who have
socially obvious emotional con-
flicts manifest in aggressive or
explosive behavior," he ex-
plained.
pa ncipal Walter Brauer said,
r. urn, "If we were to carry out
c.scipline any further we'd have
to start manhandling the kids.
"And it isn't just the school.
It's the society. It's parents. Peo-
ple in society are thumbing their
noses at rules and regulations
today and the kids are aping
that."
The school has made curricu-
lum changes in hopes that more
remedial and vocational courses
will help solve the problem.
Complains a parent of a pupil
at Vallejo, Calif. High School
which was closed March 13 due
to racial fighting: "There is no
one in the schools to advise black
students what courses to take to
get into college. They say you're
going to take home economics or
woodwork."
The school has 2,700 pupils and
31 per cent are black.
The hardest hit school in New
York City has been George
Washington High. Since last
spring it has been periodically
closed. Pupils have taken over
the cafeteria and held noisy
demonstrations in the halls. Po-
lice once found fire bombs and
there was an incident when pu-
pils set fires in lockers and ran
through the halls beatng other
pupils.
"We have found conditions at
our school to be inhuman and un-
bearable and therefore we are
proud to be known as disrup-
ters," said Ellen Lurie, a moth-
er of five children in public
schools including a 15-year old
daughter at George Washington.
Out of a class of 1,000 pupils
who entered the school three
years ago, Lurie said, only 273
received academic diplomas
which qualify them for admis-
teacher to teach nature classes to
children.
National Inns, Ltd., N.J., room ste-
wardesses and mgt. trainees on N. J.
Broadwalk.
Penn. Dept. of Transportation, Har
risburg, Pr., civil engr. trainee rog.
open to students who have completed
their soph. year.
Santa Fe Railway, Chicago, follow-
ing openings available in various parts
of the country - res. asst. in cost
analysis, clerical, switchmen/brakemen,
waiters, cooks, repair and locomotive
maintenance, technician type positions.
Cedar Point, Sandusky, Ohio, f o o d
dept. and operations. Join the courtesy
corps.
Waverly schools, Lansing, announces
summer rec. program; instructors need-
ed in tennis, golf, archery and gym-
nastics.
PLACEMENT SERVICES
3200 S.A.B.
Michigan Civil Service Comm. still
has openings on schedule, Apr. 8; if
you want to interview, call 764-7460.
Call for an appointment with I.B.M.
for Apr. 7; they will talk with any
major.

sion to college. Most of the 273
were white. More than half the
original class dropped out.
School Chancellor Harvey B.
Scribner recently ordered that
additional security measures be
taken in New York City schools.
.He noted there were 287 reported
attacks on school employes last
year. Scribner said his action
was hastened by two rape attacks
on teachers in their classrooms.
Scribner added that a "more
healthy and honest involvement
of student in the total operation
of the school" might help ease
the situation and help build bet-

ter relations between pupils and
staff.
Still, there is no doubt that a
racial issue is involved in school
tensions.
One hotspot in the California
school system is at Pomona
where in January of this year
blacks led a boycott of classes,
police were called to patrol 11t
schools and dozens of fires were
set.
Pomona city officials have en-
couraged open housing and the
city's black population grew in
10 years from one per, cent to
nearly 10 per cent of. the city's

89,000 residents. Of 24,000 pupils,
18 per cent are black.
"Black students came in who
never before experienced being
in class with whites and were
mixed inhwith vhites who never
before had had the opportunity
to grow up with blacks," said
Pomona Mayor Benjamin Law-
ing.
In some cases, said John Beck-
er, the assistant school superin-
tendent, parents encouraged their
children to fight.
'"A white father came right
on one campus and goaded his
son into beating up a black.".

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CAN ONLY BE FULLY
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CALL (215) 878-5800
24 hours 7 days
FOR TOTALLY
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MONDAY

APRIL,

5

ELECT THE DEMOCRATIC TEAM - First Ward: NORRIS THOMAS;t
FABER; Third Ward: NELSON MEADE; Fourth Ward: GILBERT LEE;

Second Ward: COUNCILMAN ROBERT
Fifth Ward: DON WARBEN

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