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March 31, 1971 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-31

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J

Wednesday & Thursday March 31st & April 1st
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
NEXT
by Terrance McNally
and
A TRAGICOMEDY IN ONE ACT
by Nikos Kazantzakis
ARENA THEATRE, Frieze Building
Promptly at 4:10 P.M. or earlier if theatre is filled
ADMISSION FREE

ii

piage three

Sfr1i i an

a it

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, March 31, 1971

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

presents
LEN CHANDLER
Columbia Recording Artist-Four Nights
THURS.-SUN. Night 330 MAYNARD ST.
April 1-4 8 P.M. Doors Open

iU
news briefs
By The Associated Press
BRITAIN'S CONSERVATIVE GOVERNMENT, faced w it h
inflation and unemployment, yesterday announced sweeping
tax cuts for industry and higher welfare benefits for the elderly.
Anthony Barber, chancellor of the exchequer, announced the
government's national taxation budget to a packed House of Com-
mons.
In addition to the higher pensions for the old, Barber also
increased war pensions and unemployment benefits.
These increases will have to be paid for -in higher social welfare
contributions by workers.
* * *
FORMER SEN. GEORGE SMATHERS, an official of the
Association of American Railroads, urged Congress yesterday to
rescue the nation's ailing railroads with a $36 billion program.
This would include federal loan guarantees, grants, tax breaks
and regulatory reform over a period of 11 years.
Smathers testified on a report by America's Sound Transporta-
tion Review Organization (ASTRO), an industry study group for
which he is general counsel.
A railroad union official, Stephen Ailes, who appeared with
Smathers, said the government's share would be less than one-
fifth of the $36 billion.
Other specialists, however, have estimated that the total federalr
and local government contributions could run to $1.5 billion a year
if various tax breaks sought by the industry were included.
* * *

Soviets

agree

on

biological

weapons

ban

GENEVA L) - The Soviet Union, in a surprise move yes-
terday, broke nearly two years of deadlock in the Geneva dis-
armament talks by agreeing to the Western idea of a separate
ban on biological weapons of war.
The Soviet policy shift coincided with Soviet party chief
Leonid Brezhnev's call for a five-power conference on nuclear
disarmament, made yesterday at the opening of the 24th So-
viet Communist party congress in Moscow. The conference
would include the United States, France, Britain and the Peo-
ple's Republic of China.
In a six-hour report to 4,943 delegates from 80 countries,
he also held out the prospect?

AAFC

APRIL 1

75c

Marx's Brothers
Night at the Opera

-Associated Press
Thumbs up, Jacks
Red-bearded Digby Jacks, a Communist, makes a thumbs up sign
yesterday after he was elected new president of Britain's National
Union of Students at the union's annual conference in Lancaster.

Aud. A-Angell Hall

7:00-9:30

'i

a

THE U.S. PAROLE BOARD will rule today whether to free VOLUNTEER FORCE:
Teamsters President James Hoffa, who has been serving an
eight-year jury-tampering sentence in Lewisburg, Pa. since 1967.
Most Teamsters sources report that Hoffa, whose five-year termt Hu elk s
as president expires in July, would be easily re-elected if freed from OAspi a v be r
prison and available to run. -
Hoffa was approached in prison by persons who offered to seek'
the aid of Sen. John McClellan (D-Ark.), in Hoffa's parole bid fora
$1 million, the Justice Department has acknowledged.v
McClellan, who conducted extensive Senate investigations into
the activities of Hoffa and the Teamsters in the 1950s, said Monday WASHINGTON (iP) - Debate on The
he opposes a parole for Hoffa. The abortive effort to enlist his aid a two-year draft extension open- Comm
never reached him, officials said. ed in the House yesterday w it h billion,
opinions conflicting about its bud- jection
a * * * gfnfin o, - inrno+ivPC fr. n a

on army
'es, draft
House Armed Services
ittee boosted that to $2.7
, tying in Pentagon p r 0-
s for the second-year in-
The White House has tak-
public stand against that
1.
bill before the House would
rize the President to abol-
udent draft deferments, in-
g those for divinity s t u -
and would add a third year
present two-year nonmili-
ervice requirement for con-
ous objectors.

of better relations with the
United States and the People's
Republic of China.
Meanwhile in Geneva, Soviet
delegate Alexei Reshchin pre-
sented a draft convention prohibit-
ing development, production and
stockpiling of biological weapons
and toxins.
The draft provides for destruction
of all these arms within three
months after the treaty enters into
force.
Cosponsored by Bulgaria, Czech-
oslovakia, Hungary, Poland, Ro-
mania and Mongolia, the Soviet
draft was virtually the same as a
British draft convention introduced
at the 25-nation talks in July 1969.
Until now, the British proposal
had been stiffly opposed by the So-
viet block who had insisted on a
package ban on both biological and
chemical weapons.
The Soviet draft provides for a
ban on, all biological agents and
toxins that are not specifically de-
signed for the prevention of dis-
ease or other peaceful purposes.
It also calls for a ban on all mili-
tary equipment or means of deliv-
ery employed in the warlike use of
biological w e a p o n s. Signatories
would be pledged not to assist or
encourage any other country to vio-
late the treaty.
Introducting the draft Roshchin
told the conference his government
had agreed to a separate treaty on
biological weapons to help the ne-
gotiations out of their deadlock.
But he stressed Moscow still
insists negotiations must start soon
on a similar ban of all ^nemical
weapons, including defoliants, her-
bicides and tear gases used by U.S.
forces in Vietnam.

U.S.. war
actions hit
byMuski~e
WASHINGTON (P) - Sen. Ed-
mund Muskie of Maine has ex-
pressed regret that he didn't speak
out earlier against American mili-
tary involvement in South Viet-
nam - perhaps as much as six
years ago.
"I've often wished that I'd ex-
pressed my doubts publicly at that
time," said Muskie in a television
interview.
In the Senate yesterday, Muskie
said "obsession with the body
count" has led to indiscriminate
U.S. bombing in Southeast Asia.
Senate Republican L e a d e r
Hugh Scott of Pennsylvania called
that "a dreadful charge" and
said current critics might better
have spoken out six, seven or eight
years ago.
Muskie, now the top prospect for
the 1972 Democratic presidential
nomination, advocates a Con-
gressional deadline for American
withdrawal by the end o fthis
year.
Describing the evolution of his
view about the war in a record-
ed television interview on the
David Frost show produced by
Westinghouse Broadcasting Co.,
Muskie said, "I had doubts about
about it that I expressed."

get

L-uustlilg pay illcel141V

President Nixon's "zero dra
THE U.S. POSTAL SERVICE, confident of an increase in unee Army.
postal rates by mid-May, is sending out 5 billion eight-cent Nixon asked $987 millio
stamps to post offices across the nation. first-year pay boost tow
The proposed rate increases have not yet been approved by tracting enough volunteer
the five-member Postal Rate Commission, created last year when the need of the draft byJ
legislation revamping the old Post Office Department was passed. 1973.
2:45 The rate commission has been asked to act on a proposal that --_~~
5, 7, 9 would raise a regular stamp by two cents, an air mail stamp by . .
S DAY one cent and second and third-class postage rates by 142 per cent and H 7c 11,I e ,

ves for crease.
aft" vol- en no
action
r as the The
ard at- author
-s to and ish stu
June 30, cluding
dents,
_ . to th e
. tary se
e / scienti

4

Doors Open 1
Shows at 1, 3,
DIAL 8-6416 TODAY IS LADIE

L#32 per cent, respectively.

A host of amendments, including
at least three to tie the draft to
C.im es back the Indochina war, are expected
com es back to require three days of debating
and voting with a final vote plan-
HONG KONG RP - Communist ned for tomorrow. No major
China released a hijacked Philip- amendment is expected to pass.
pine Airlines jetliner yesterday House draft opponents p 1 a n
and the plane landed at Hong first to try to abolish the Selec-
Kong with all aboard except the tive Service System, then block
five young Filipino hijackers. any draft extension beyond its
The hijackers diverted the plane June 30 expiration. If this fails
yesterday morning from a domes- they will try to extend it one year
tic flight in the Philippines, re- instead of two.
fueled at Hong Kong and flew to House Republican Leader Ger-
Canton. ald Ford of Michigan said he per-
The passengers, including four sonally favors the bill's tripling
Americans. landed in the southern the President's $987-million p a y
request to $2.7 billion as a "ma-
Chinese city shortly after noon jor incentive Lo move to an all-

U.S., Russia attempt
to end Pakistan fight

yesterday.

volunteer force.',

I -

3020 Washtenow, Ph. 434-1782
4th
BIG
WEEK

NEW DELHI (AP) - The United
States, the Soviet Union and In-
dia are seeking a common ap-
proach to bring an end to t h e
fighting in East Pakistan, Indian
official sources reported yester-
day.
Sources close to the Indian For-
eign Ministry said discussions were
under way in Washington, Moscow
and N e w Delhi, in addition to
parallel talks at the United Na-
tions.
The sources, however, did not

I

New From Levi !
For the Student Body:
Boot Jeans
$1.50

disclose what action w a s being
considered.
A U.S. Embassy spokesman con-
firmed that diplomatic discus-
sions were taking place between
India and the United States about
East Pakistan but said he could
not disclose any details.
The diplomatic offensive was re-
ported as there was mounting evi-
dence that the Pakistan army had
tightened its control o v e r the
Eastern province w h e r e a civil
war between the armed forces and
the followers of Sheik Mujibur
Rahman's Awami League broke
out last Thursday.
A plane load of 60 Yugoslav
evacuees arrived in New Delhi
from Dacca en route to Belgrade
with accounts of the situation in
the provincial capital since Sun-
day. Foreign newsmen have been
expelled from East Pakistan and
the government h a a imposed
heavy censorship throughout the
nation.
T h e Yugoslavs, representing
families of engineers and techni-
cians working in Dacca, said the
army was in full control of that
city and that there did not appear
to be any resistance.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $5 by carrier, $5 by mail.

SHOW TIMES
WEEKDAYS
7 and 9 only
SAT. and SUN.
1-3-5-7-4

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