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March 30, 1971 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-30

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Pjge Ten

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 30, 19?'

P~ige Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March 30, 1971

U
3

i

eeds

our

ote

01

t

,onda

He

Deserves

it

,I

Over the

last two years, Ann Arbor has enjoyed more active and effec-

tive city government than ever before.

The Harris Administration has

offered new programs and, equally important, new attitudes toward all
of Ann Arbor's citizens.

Just

Take

a

Look

at

the

Record:

* DRUGS AND DRUG ABUSE
The Harris administration is committed to implementing the Ad Hoc Drug Com-
mittee's excellent report. It stresses education, treatment, recreational facilities
and law enforcement policies that distinguish between hard and soft drugs and
between pushers and users. Mobile crisis clinics and treatment centers staffed by
street people are also part of the plan. The administration has furnished $6,000
to Ozone House so far and has obtained a $64,000 grant for the local methadone
treatment clinic. Mayor Harris has publicly said he favors legalizing marijuana to
the same extent that alcohol is now legalized, pending the results of current
studies.
" HOUSING
For the first time ever landlords are learning that they have to objey the laws -
and good laws-too. The housing code was given teeth for the first time; more
inspectors, deadlines for compliance, an end to nominal fines and a host of new
remedies for the tenant and the City-rent withholding, injunctions, and receiver-
ship. The City built public housing for the first time-100 units up and 160 more
under construction. The Harris administration has fought a dozen zoning and an-
nexation battles to increase the rental housing supply.
" DISCRIMINATION
The Harris administration has extended the City's anti-discrimination I a w s on
housing to include employment, public accommodations and apprenticeship
training, and now covers sex as well as race. There are more effective remedies
-cease and desist orders, fixed fines, injunctions and compensatory damages.
Affirmative action to hire more black employees is required of the c i t y and its
contractors. 'Testing' is authorized to find discrimination. And the city has add-
ed a last crucial ingredient: new, vigorous leadership in its own Human Rights
Department.

" POLICE-COMMUNITY RELATIONS
Progress has been made, even in this most difficult of areas. The city hasalpoint-
ed an ombudsman, banned the use of mace and published a booklet on citizen's
rights when arrested. Uniformed policemen are now required to wear I.D. badges
whenever on duty and now must issue information slips to any citizen stopped but
not ticketed or arrested. Most important,,the Harris Administration has handled
confrontations sensibly, maintaining the peace with resort to the absolute mini-
mal use of force.
" ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING
Ann Arbor is an attractive city and the Harris Administration is trying to keep it
that way. It passed a $3 million bond i s s u e to restore Geddes Pond and repair
Huron River dams, obtained grants for phosphate removal and other sewage treat-
ment improvements, passed four major city ordinances on soil erosion, air pollu-
tion, shopping center landscaping and abandoned houses. And zoning, for once,
has been used to protect trees, streams and ponds rather than to promote narrow
real estate and developer interests.
" PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
For the first time Ann Arbor has a city-owned regular bus system, with a dial-a-
bus plan prepared and awaiting state approval. Equally important, the city has
declared a moratorium on parking structure construction until its first compre-
hensive transportation plan is completed. The plan will cover city and university
parking and movement; cars, buses, cabs, bikes and pedestrians.

p

~iI

4.

Make

Your

Vote

Count

I

A

Lot

Depends

on

It

0

0

'0

oc

I

Ic,

0

01F

Pr

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