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March 30, 1971 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-30

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 30, 1971

Pae_ ihtTH.ICIGNDAL

.!! _- _r

-VOTE TODAY-
RESPONSIBLE
ALTERNATIVE PARTY
Bill Jacobs
Shirley Nickovich
Jack White
for
Student Government Council
MEMBERS-AT-LARGE

I

Defense aids stickmen Netters look impressive

a

By RICH STUCK
Ask any coach of a team sport
here at Michigan what a vital
part of the game is and he will
almost assuredly say defense.
And lacrosse coach Bob Kaman
is no exception.
Worried about the defense go-
ing into the game Sunday at Co-
lumbus against the Columbus La-
crosse Club, Kaman has no fears
now as his lacrossemen com-
bined a sterling defense swith
smart attack play to come away
victorious by an 8-2 count.
They broke open a 2-2 half-time
score with six unanswered goals
in the second half to provide the
winning margin.
It was a convincing and satisfy-
ing win for Michigan, as they
evened their overall record at
1-1 for the season, and more im-
portantly, boosted them into first
place in the Midwest Lacrosse
Club Association standings with
a 1-0 mark.
About the game, Kaman said.
"We stopped them completely by
playing defensively as a team".
He singled out three defensemen
for special mention, frontliners
Tim Cotter, Dave Fischer, and
Pete Lodwick.
In the loss to Oberlin two
weeks ago, this defensive trio
was very porous, due mainly to a
shoulder injury to Fischer in-
curred in the game. But Sunday,
with Fischer back in the lineup,
they played as any coach would
love to have his defensemen
play.
According to Kaman, "It was
just great, the number of shots
that did not get through to the
goal. Our defense blocked so
many shots that goalie Jay John-

son had to make only e-ght
saves."
But Kaman is quick to point
out, that while Johnson was not
called on to make a significant
number of saves, he nevertheless
_played "a good clear game. Jay
cleared the ball cleanly out of
our end numerous times tb start
offensive thrusts".
"The defense played so well",
said Kaman, "that the only goals
scored against us were on scram-
bles, in which a player went in
alone on our goalie after picking
up a loose ball. Other than that,
we smothered their offense com-
pletely. Columbus was supposed
to have an All-American attack-
man on the field and if he was
there I sure didn't notice him."
While obviously pleased with
the defensive play-of his club,
Kaman was also very proud of
the fine play and the improve-
ment shown by the attackmen
and midfielders.
The three attackmen used by
coach Kaman as regulars all
turned in impressive perform-
ances. Don Holman, a freshman
from New York, figured in three
of Michigan's eight goals, scor-
ing twice and assisting on an-
other. Rogers Mills also tallied
twice, while the third attackman
Steve Hart had two assists.
Kaman added that the score
"would have been much higher
if we had been able to shoot with
greater accuracy." He chuckled,
"We kept hitting their goalie. As
it was we still literally peppered
him w i t h numerous shots
throughout as we dominated
them, both offensively and de-
fensively."
The people who play an un-
portant role in each of these as-
pects of the game are the mid-
fielders. And Sunday, they too,
played an excellent game. Be-
cause they do most of the run-
ning in the game, Kaman uses
three lines of middies, whic he

substitutes freely during the
game.
"All three lines played well
against Columbus," was Kaman's
comment.
Leading the way was the line
of Don Dworsky, Skip Flana-
gan, and Dick Dean. Dworsky
scored two goals and Dead one
as they, like the attackmen, ham-
mered away at the helpless Co-
lumbus goalie.
Flanagan was very instrumen-
tal in the scoring as he set up
three Michigan counters. Round-
ing out the scoring for Michigan
was middie Sandy Ervin.
"I am very pleased at the way
the guys played Sunday," Kamen
stated emphatically. "During the
last two weeks of practice we
worked hard to overcome the
technicalhproblems. Along with
eliminating the mistakes, they
showed me an awful lot of spirit,
hustle, and true team play."
With one day of practice re-
maining before the real tougbie
on the schedule, Bowling Green,
Kaman appears optimistic.
"They were ranked fourth in
the country last year and they
only beat us 9-6. Of course,
they're the toughest team we'll
play this year, but we'll be ready
for them. The defense is back
and the offensive players are be-
ginning to work cohesively;
these are great signs which
makes it look like we'll be pre-
pared to play a good game
Wednesday."
Although commenting, "It's
good to win an away game,"
Kaman emphasized that he would
like to start the home season off
on the right track here Wednes-
day with a victory over the rug-
ged Bowling Green squad.
The 34 players on Michigan's
team who have been practicing
outdoors since February 1, would
gladly welcome any interest-d
spectators. Game time is 3:30 on
the Tartan Turf of Ferry Field.

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By RANDY PHILLIPS
Despitesan injury and a case
of illness, Michigan's netters
managed to nip h o s t Notre
Dame for top honors in t h e
Irish Invitational Tennis Tourn-
ament concluded Sunday.
The Wolverines breezed by
their first three opponents,
Florida, Notre Dame, and Illi-
nois but were stopped short by
main Big Ten challenger In-
diana, 5-4.
Michigan compiled 24 points
to nose out Notre Dame with
23 and Indiana 22.
Illinois followed up with 16
while the visitors from Florida
managed only a meager 6 points.
The tournament began on the
right foot for the Wolverines
Friday as they polished off Flor-
ida easily, 8-1. The only Michi-
gan setback came when Sopho-
more Mike Ware had to be pull-
ed from the six singles match
when he came down with stom-
ach cramps. Other than that
loss all five other singles match-
es were decided in straight sets.
Saturday s a w the Michigan
netters compete in two match-
es, t h e first against a tough
Notre Dame squad.
Wolverine Coach Brian Eis-
ner called the contest against
the Irish "a key match" since
Notre Dame had just come off
a narrow victory over the team
thought to be Michigan's main
competition in the tournament,
Indiana. Notre Dame had also
just returned from a trip to Cal-
ifornia where they finished 4-4.
But Michigan came through
with an inspired performance
to down the Irish 6-3. In that
match the top t w o Michigan
doubles team broke the Irish's
back with wins.
Both Irish pairs were consid-
ered extremely tough. Eisner
had especially high praise for.
the team of Mike Ware and Tim
Ott who downed the second No-
tre Dame doubles combination.
Kevin Senich, Wolverine num-
ber four man, did not compete
against the Irish when he turn-
ed an ankle.
In the afternoon match on
Saturday, the Wolverines tack-
led Big Ten challenger Illinois
and came away with only an
unimpressive 6-3 victory. Eisner
remarked that his squad was
not up for the match for var-
ious reasons.
The Michigan mentor con-
cluded that the Michigan net-
ters had won the first five sin-
gles matches, and seemed con-
tent to win the match with as
little effort as possible. But Il-
linois was super-charged since
the Michigan contest w a s its
first of the tournament.
Another reason that the Wol-
verine netmen may have been
down is that in the rules of scor-
ing for the tournament any
team that wins all of its match-
es automnatically wvins the com-
petition, even if that team fails
to win in total amount of points.
Michigan was confident it
could down the Hoosiers t h e
next morning to claim the
championship.
But the Hoosiers were not to
give up without a fight, a n d
they turned in a sparkling per-
formance to clip Michigan 5-4.
Joel Ross, number one, a n d

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-Daily-Jim Judkis
TIM OTT, the Wolverines number two singles ace, awaits the
serve. Ott, along with doubles partner Mike Ware, drew high
praise from tennis coach Brian Eisner for his fine performances
in the Irish Invitational Tournament this past weekend.

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Coleman's condition better;
Twins trade Zepp to Tigers
By The Associated Press
* LAKELAND - Detroit Tiger pitcher Joe Coleman, who suffered
a skull fracture when he was hit by a line drive Saturday, has im-
proved enough so he can be transferred to Lakeland General Hospital
today.
Doctors said they discovered no internal bleeding and virtually no
depression of the skull. Coleman was fed intravenously for half a day.
He resumed eating Saturday.
* ORLANDO - The Minnesota Twins traded pitcher Bill Zepp to
the Detroit Tigers yesterday for two minor league players.
Zepp, 23, had refused to sign a 1971 contract with the Twins, and
said he wanted to be traded to the Tigers.
He had a 9-4 won-lost record with Minnesota last year and a 3.22
earned run average.
The Twins got infielder Mike Adams, 22, who reports to the Twins'
Melbourne, Fla., minor league training camp, and another player to be
named later.
* TORONTO - Mayor William Dennison officially proclaimed
Wednesday as Gordie Howe Day in honor of the National Hockey League
veteran who celebrates his 43rd birthday that day.

Ott, number two, fell to the top
two Hoosiers, Mark Bishop and
Geoff Hodsdon.
Ott went through two tie
breakers 7-6, 7-6 b e f o r e suc-
cumbing to Hodsdon. R o s s"
strung out unorthodox Bishop
to three sets before falling 2-6,
6-4, 6-2.
One reason for the Wolver-
ines' inability to down the Hoos-
iers was the injury to Senich
incurred in the Notre D a m e
match. Doug McClaury, super-
sub, came in to replace Senich
and emerged with two wins -
against Illinois and Indiana.
But the injury to Senich
caused the Wolverines to move
number five Ramone Almonte
up to four and number six Mike
Ware up to fifth. As a result
both Ware and Almonte were
defeated in the Indiana match.
McClaury "did a fine job" ac-
cording to Eisner as he filled in
for Senich and Ware in t h e
Florida match. McClaury !tep-
ped right into the first doubles
slot against the Gators and
teamed up with Ott to finsh
off their opponents in straight
sets, 6-3, 6-2.
Eisner commented that "For

the most part we played very
well; as the tournament Srew
we played better and better.
Eisner was most pleased with
the performance against Notre
Dame. "We beat Notre Dame in
a real good performance."
Dick Ravreby, third seeded in
singles, impressed Eisner as he
compiled a perfect 4-0 singles
record. "He (Ravreby) played
awfully well."
The surface at Notre Dame
was very fast and Eisner said
this had a lot to do with the
close scores. The surface was a
rubberized substance, but it was
glazed with a sealer which made
it even faster.
Eisner remarked that with the
new surface, "the difference be-
tween players is minimized; it
minimizes the number and types
of shots." This advantage would
go to a serve and volley game
type of player, but would hamp-
er a player with a good ground
game.
Eisner had planned to rotate
his three doubles teams since
they were all playing about
equally well, but after Senich
got injured that plan was scrap-
ped.

1i

FRAZIER LAST:
Ali faces final bout

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DETROIT () - Muhammad
Ali said yesterday his expected
rematch against Joe Frazier will
be his last fight and then he
will retire "to spread the Mus-
lim faith."
The controversial Ali, who
lost a 15-round decision March
8 to defending heavyweight
champ Frazier in New York, still
stressed the "I was robbed" ap-
proach on the fight' but said
"next time I'll do better."

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LauriElli*as, Barbara Goldman,
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members of the PEOPLE'S COALITION have been en-
dorsed by the following individuals and organizations:
TENANTS UNION,
Mrs. Barbara Fuller, Director, Interfaith Council
for peace
Gaye F. Crouch, Carol Tomke, Rosalind Daly,
members of PROBE into the Status of Women at
the University of Michigan
Dorothy Herberg and Sasah Siano, members of

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|

He spoke at an informal press
conference in a Detroit hotel
suite. He was in t o w n for a
charity variety show to raise
money for city youths.
A rematch with Frazier is con-
sidered a virtual certainty and
Ali, also known as Cassius Clay,
said it'll probably be held in
California. Normally a rematch
clause is automatically in title
fight contracts in case the chal-
lenger happens to beat the
champion.
Asked how he could possibly
retire if he beats Frazier when
he undoubtedly would be requir-
ed to face hin again, Ali said:
"If this fight ended in a way
where he wouldn't want a re-
match you can pass over those
things. If I beat him convinc-
ingly he won't want a re-
match." After he retires, Aii
said he could "do what I can
for the Muslim faith - to
spread it, to help it any way I
can."
His days of spouting poetry
haven't ended. Former light-
heavyweight champion Archie
Moore walked into the room and
Ali put- his right arm around
Moore's massive shoulders and
said:
"Next time you c o m e to my
fight.
"Don't block the aisles or door,
"Because you may have to leave,
"By round four."
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THE NEW DRAFT LAW:
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Proving medical, psychiatric dis-
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tion; sample forms; defending
criminal charges; denials of due

AI

4

"11

TONIGHT at 7:30 p.m.
The Future of Japanese Religions
PROFESSOR JOSEHPH M. KITAGAWA
* author of THE RELIGIONS OF THE EAST
0 professor of the History of Religions
and Dean of the Divinity School
at the University of Chicago

Advisory Committee of the Ann Arbor Community
Child Care League
Jerry De Grieck, Executive Vice-President of SGC
Charles Cell, Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars
STUDENTS FOR THE PEACE TREATY

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r~l At~ TL I. A A-_1a' ---. _-- - -

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