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March 27, 1971 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SQtUrday, March 27, 1971

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, March 27, 1971

45,000 MONTAGNARDS

S.

Viets order forced relocation of tribe

-Daily-Denny Gainer
Two's company
The warmth of springtime comes late to some. For them, lives
desolate are compensated with nature's company. Her feeble at-
tempts grow stronger day by day as her strength makes for long
walks in solitude that end at benches. Nature's warmth replaces
that of previous company.
SGC CANDIDATE:
Panel penalizes Thee
for excess spending

(Continued from Page 1)
locating Montagnards had been1
solved.x
General Dzu ordered all pro-
vince chiefs in Region II 1 a t e
last summer to eliminate a 11
Montagnard hamlets rated C andt
D (contested and Viet Cong-con-E
trolled hamlets) by relocating1
them near lines of communica-E
tion. Senior U.S. officials in the
provinces defend the relocation onI
the grounds that it will deny the
population and resources of Mon-i
tagnard hamlets to the Viet Cong.-
In Washington a State Depart-
ment spokesman verified that the
Montagnards were "removed by
the Vietnamese military for secur-
ity reasons."
But officials whose primary con-
cern is the welfare of the Mon-
tagnards say their interests are1
not being taken into account. "The
people carrying out this move
talk about security as though it)
were only military security,' says
one official in social welfare work.
"The Montagnards are more con-1
cerned about economic security."
U.S. officials in Saigon and in
the provinces say that when Dzu;
ordered the move last summer, he
ignored established regulations re-
quiring the submission of detailed
plans both for the movement and
for the economic and social wel-
fare of the relocation population.
Without prior planning, these
sources say, Dzu began to m o v e
during the autumn harvest season,
leaving relocated hamlets without
their rice supply for the remainder
of the year. He stopped the relo-
cation until the end of the har-
vest only in October after De-
puty Director of CORDS for Re-
gion II Edward T. Long wrote a
personal letter to Dzu requesting
the postponement.
In Darlac Province, the lack of
planning resulted in heavy losses
~ of livestock, rice and other val-
uable possessions in the process
of moving to the relocation sites,
d according to one official who has
interviewed the relocated Mon-
dtagnards.
Only a fraction of the water
buffalo, cattle and other animals
t could be brought with the peo-
- ple, because of their hurried moves
s by truck and U.S. Chinook heli-
copters. Virtually all the hard-
a wood furniture found in Montag-
. nard longhouses had to be left be-
d hind. Cattle and ceremonial gongs
were stolen by ARVIN troopsmand
~later sold in a nearby Vietnamese
s market town.
e Since arriving at Buon Kli B
- relocation site, the Montagnards
have lost virtually all of the re-
o maining livestock. Only one cow
f was visible during a walking tour
t - -_

of Buon Wing A, one of the four1
hamlets at the site, and it ap-I
peared to be sick. When askedI
where their livestock was, people
answered that they had all died.
But the most urgent problem of
the Montagnard relocation cent-l
ers in Darlac is the shortage ofE
land. Montagnards find themselv-
es competing with Vietnamese as
well as with each other for the
limited supply of accessible land.
In several areas in the prov-4
ince recently relocated Montag-
nard hamlets have found t h a t
Vietnamese farmers have moved
in to cultivate much of the near-
by land.
At the same time, Vietnamese
are continuing to encroach on land
previously abandoned by relo-
cated Montagnards. U.S. officials
here point out that the same de-
velopments occurred after previous
Montagnard relocations in t h e
province.
At Buon Drai Si, near Route 14
north of Banmethuot, 3,200 Mon-
tagnards relocated in May, 1970,
were promised by the district chief
that they would be able to farm
all the land west of the Eo De
River. But Vietnamese immed-
iately began farming the land.
At Buon Nie Ea Sah, where 2800
people were relocated in Decem-
ber, 1969, and January, 1970,
farmers from the nearby Viet-
namese village of Halan have con-
tinued to push west of the relo-2
cation sites to occupy the 1 a n d
promised to the Montagnards.
People in Buon Nie Ea Sah say
that the province chief met with
the village chiefs of Halan and
Nie Ea Sah last September and
promised the Montagnards all the
land on their side of Route 14, but
the Vietnamese refused to leave
the land, and nothing has been
heard from the province chief
since then.
South of Banmethuot at Buon
M'bre, U.S. engineers cleared sub-
stantial land for Montagnards who
resettled last October. But when

they arrived at Buon M'bre, Viet-
namese had already begun to
move onto their land.
At Buon Kli B, with nearly 7,000
people the largest resettlement site,
in Larlac Province, population
pressure and advancing Vietnam-
ese farmers leave the Montagnards
with only a fraction of the land
required to sustain themselves.
Before the move, Vietnamese
province officials planned to allot
only two-tenths of a hectare to
each family. But U.S. social wel-
fare advisers estimate that a
minimum of two hectares is need-
ed to sustain a Montagnard fam-
ily.
One thousand hectares of clear-
ed land near the resettlement site
is already being farmed by 100
Vietnamese farmers with tractors.
The land squeeze is forcing re-
located Montagnards to c h o o s e
between cultivating parcels of land
too small to support them trying
to walk long distances to f i n d
more land, or looking for em-
ployment elsewhere.
At Buon Nie Ea Sah, a lo c al
resident-said that the people have
an average of one-half to one
hectare per family, and that most
families were not getting enough
to eat. At Buon Kli B, Montag-

nard farmers report having to walk
as far as 10 kilometers to find
land.
One educated Montagnard re-
marked bitterly that the relocation
centers in Darlac surrounded by
Vietnamese-occupied land "look'
like Indian reservations."
-He suspects that Vietnamese
policy is aimed at making r u r a 1
proletariat out of relocated Mon-
tagnards, noting that in Lam Dong
Province as well, Vietnamese re-
located Montagnards near a tea
plantation.
A dispute between Montagnards
and Mrs. Nguyen Cao Ky over
claims to 3,700 acres in another
Central Highland province w a s
reported in January. Mrs. Ky says
the land is "public domain" while
the Montagnards argue they should
regain the land after it is retaken
from the Viet Cong.
Asked about the possibility of
Montagnards reclaiming their
former lands in the future, Henry
Sandri, deputy director of the
office of development operations at
CORDS Regional Headquarters in
Nhatrang, replied, "They can file
a claim anytime, but security will
determine whether and when they
can go back."
But he said that he did not

understand why Vietnamese farm-
ers were farming in areas which
Montagnards had been forced to
leave for reasons of security.
Deputy Senior Advisor Bartley
says that relocated Montagnards
in Darlac "are reacting to the
move as though it is permanent.
The longer they stay there the
less they will want to go back to
the old buons."
But a Montagnard leader in
Banmethuot vehemently disagrees.
"All of them want to go back,"
he says. "There they had very
gdod land. Here they can't do any-
thing."
1971, Dispatch News Service
International

4

University Reformed
Church
1001 E. HURON

i*

9:30 a.m. Discussion Classes
10:30 a.m "On the Alert"
Calvin Malefyt speaking
6:00 p.m..Student and
Family Supper and
Film: "Act of Death-
Word of Life"

I

New Factory
CELEBRATION
20% off on all
JENSEN Speakers
III F1 STUDlIO
121 W. Washington
Summer Employment
Classic Crafts Corporation
is presently interviewing for
summer program
MUST BE ABLE TO TRAVEL
AND WORK 13 WEEKS
Starting April 30 thru July 31
Guaranteed Salary $2,000
Interviews
March 25, March 31, April 8
Phone 764-7460-Summer
Placement Office-212 SAB

Nod

4

(Continued from Page 1)
various pamphlets, leaflets, and
other posters, and decided not to
use the 470 unused silkscreen
posters.
Thee also admitted that he had
made a mistake in saying Thurs-
day night at the first hearing that
he had purchased only 200 silk-
screen posters.
"It would have been the honest
thing to go to Bob (SGC Elections
Director Bob Nelson) and explain
that I've had these things made. I
didn't and I was wrong," Thee
said.
Thee felt that the unused cam-
paign materials should not have
been included in his total cam-
paign expenses. "To count those as
campaign expenditures is really
ridiculous," Thee explained.
Board members responded, how-
ever, that the possession of large
quantities of materials over the
$100 market value limit, ga Thee
operating leverage in his came-
paign not available to other can-
didates.
After the ruling was announced,
Thee said, "The amount by which
I was alleged to have exceeded the
expense limit was for materials
in no way intended for campaign
use. The total expenses for cam-
paign materials that have been
or will be used is $101."
"I am sure that this kind of smaar
tactic will not a f f e c t the de-
cision of the students at this Uni-
versity who want to finally have
a representative and effective
Apathy in
LSA vote
(Continued from Page 1)
week's election. The plan would
tax each student $1.85, of which
one dollar would go to each stu-
dent's school government, with the
remaining 85 'cents going to Stu-
dent Government Council.
"The plan would help us in-
crease our legitimacy," s a y s
Bridges. Ratner says an advantage
in the plan is that it "gives the
school governments autonomy"
from the University power struc-
ture.
The ten candidates running for
the seven executive council seats
are: Jenny Allen, Russ Bikoff, Bob
Black, Brenda McGandy, Bill Ja-
cobs, Matalee Smokevitch, James
Steel, Marc Steinberg, Steve Weiss-
man, and David Young.
ERROR!
A good sublet but
the wrong phone number
was given n Daily
STiLL
Come see our house:
516 Walnut
1. Near the orb,
cemetery and women's

Student Government Council,"
Thee stated.
During both hearings Thee an
his running mate, Jim Kent, ex-
pressed doubt about the motiva
tions of Heyn and others "behin
the proceedings."
Kent remarked last night tha
"I see the whole thing as a poli
tical move against two candidate
who are running for office."
"I'll be damned if this isn'ta
witchhunt." Thee said last night
Gutman responded, "No, I would
not consider it a witchhunt. It wa
a fair complaint, filed properly,
"At the time the complaint wa
filed there was reason to believ
the complaint had some legiti
macy.
SGC President Marty Scott, who
is running for re-election, said o
the board proceedings last nigh
that "it's really a harassment, an
it's disgusting."
"I'm really unhappy about t hE
whole thing," he added.
Also at the hearing last night
SGC candidate Brad Taylor, g
behalf of the Student Caucus par
ty, filed a complaint against Th
Daily for stating SGC member
Jay Hack was "seeking re-elec
tion."
Hack was never elected to SGC
but was appointed to a vacan
seat.
Questioned about the complain
Taylor said, "In presenting th
real situation to the student Th
Daily is negligent. Our complain
concerns a distortion of the trut.
by The Daily and is a means o
fighting the political 'bossism' o
the small group of people wh
control the Michigan Machine
Daily."
At the hearing, Taylor com
mented about his complaint: "Let
face it. Sometimes we're not ser
ious. We're just trying to winE
political campaign."

ULRICH'S BOOKSTORE
to
Three Former Employees
ERNEST BUNDY HOWARD BAKER MILTON MOORE

d
e;
-,
n
e
-r
it
it
e
e
it
h
)f
if
A
LO
e'
i-
s
r-
a

COURSE MART
Deadline v
March 31
Proposals for fall courses
must be submitted to
Student Counseling Office
1018 Angell Hall

YACHTING
SUMMER
POSITIONS
The American Yachting Asso-
ciation with listings, on the
East Coast, West Coast, Gulf
Area, and the Great Lakes is
soliciting for summer crew
applicants.
Positions are available for
experienced as well as inex-
perienced male and female
college students and gradu-
ates. Experience in cooking
and child care may be par-
ticularly helpful.
Crewing affords one the
opportunity to earn reason-
able sums while engaged in
pleasant outdoor activity.
To apply type a 1 page
resume following as closely
as possible the form shown
below. In April your resume
will be edited, printed and
sent to approximately 1500-
2500 (depending on area)
large craft owners.
RESUME FORM - (1)
name, address (home and
school), phone number, age;
(2) relevant work or recrea-
tional experience; (3) dates
available and area(s); (4) 2
or more students wishing to
work together, state name of
other parties; (5) other infor-
mation.
Send your resume with $6

DON'T MISS THE NEW OWNERS'
HUGE SALE AD IN SUNDAYS

qd~

PAPER, MARCH 28TH

I

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M-Pin Bowling
SUNDAY-1 p.m.-Mid.
Michigan Union
ABORTIONS
Arrangements are made. within
24 hrs. with board certified
gynecologists in accredited New
York hospitals near airport.
Low cost-Strictly confidential
-Special consideration for stu-
dents.
516 62-8000
Open 24 hrs. 7 days
Medical Referral Service
142 Mineola Ave.
Roslyn Hts., N. Y. 11577

I

WORSHIP

I

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For the student body:
LEVI'S

I

CORDUROY
Slim Fits ....
(All Colors)

processing fee to:
American Yachting
Association
Suite 503
8730 Sunset Blvd.
Los Angeles, Calif. 90069
Your resume must be received
no later than April 15, 1971.

$6.98

I I

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
7:00 p.m.-Holy Communion.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
801 S. Forest
Donald G. Zill, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Holy Communion.
1 1 :00 a.m.-Matins.
1 :00 p.m.-Free-form Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p.m.-A Review.: "There's Something
About Us . . . Ridiculous and Sublime."
(Music, drama, readings, films).
Wednesday, 7:15 p.m.-Lenten Worship.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years).
WEDNESDAY
8:00 a m.-Testimonv Meeting.
Infants room available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon., 10-9; Tues.-Sat., 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidavs.
"The Truth That Heals," Radio WAAM, 1600,
Sunday, 8:45 a.m.
For transportation call 662-0813.

Bells ........$8.50
DENIM

FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH AND WESLEY
FOUNDATION
State at Huron and Washinqton
Church-662-4536
Wesley-668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
9:30 a.m.-Contemporary Worship Service.
11:00 a.m.-Sermon by Dr. Hoover Rupert:
"Pray to Your Father."
Broadcast WNRS 1290 am, WNRZ 103 fm,
1 1 :00 a.m. to 12:00 noon.
WESLEY FOUNDATION ITEMS:
Sunday, March 21:
5:30 p.m.-Celebration.
6:15 p.m.-Dinner
7:00 p.m.-Proqram: "Trial by Jury," Light
Opera by Gilbert and Sullivan.
Friday, April 2:
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion, Pine Room.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers:
Robert E. Sanders, John R. Waser,
Donald A. Drew, Brewster H. Gere
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.-Preaching:
Mr. Gere.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr., R. E. Simonson
Worship Services at 9:00 and 11:00 a.m.
Church School at 9:00 a.m.

UNITY OF ANN ARBOR
310 S. State St,
Phone 663-4314
Marlyn William White, Minister
Ron Johnson, Associate Minister
11:00 a.m.-Sunday Service now being held
at YM-YWCA, 350 South Fifth Ave.-Ron
Johnson.
7:30 p.m. Tuesday-Study and Prayer Class
-Mr. White
11:00 a.m. to 12 noon Wednesday-Prayer
and Counseling, also, 19 noon to 1:00 p.m.
-Healing Service-Mrs. Mattern.
Center open Mon., Wed., and Fri., 11:00 a.m.
to 2:00 p.m.
Tuesday, Center open at 6:30 p.m.
Daily Word, published at Unity Village, is
available.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheins, Pastor
Saturday, March 27th - "Clean-Up" Work
Holiday, 1:00 p.m.
Sunday at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Services.
Sunday" at 1 :00 p.m.-"Parents' Day" Dinner.
Sunday at 2:00 p.m.-Organ Recital, Mr. Harry
Gudmundson.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Lenten
Service.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Erwin A. Goede. Minister
-Church School and Services at 10:30 a.m.-
Sermon Topic: "The Spirit of Tragedy."
Nursery available.

I

Bush Jeans
Bells . ....
Pre-Shrunk
Super Slims.

$10.00
$8.00
... $7.50
... $7.00

CHIECKMATE
State Street at Liberty

AID
AID is a referral agency organized for the purpose of offering
abortion and family planning information in order to relieve the
frustration too frequently encountered in these crises. We refer
men and women upon request to other agencies or qualified in-
dividuals whose facilities meet all medical guidelines for the pur-
pose of professional guidance in the fields of birth control, steril-
ization, contraception, and artificial insemination. All inquiries
are kept strictly confidental. We offer 24-hour, 7-day a week
servce. For further information, contact us at 1-313-964-4445.

i

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SUBSCRIBE NOW

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
2580 Packard Road-971-0773
Tom Bloxam, Pastor-971-3152
Sunday School-9:45 a.m.
Wrship-i 1:00 a.m. and 7:00. p.m.
Traininq Hour-6:00 p.m.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
(corner of Forest and Washtenow
Minister: Rev. Donald Postema

1URON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3 150 Glacier Wav
Pastor: Charles Johnson
Fn. innmnt inn rnsrittion orsonalized

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