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March 26, 1971 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

00
Fridav March 76 1 C 7 t ,.

PageEigh THEMICHGAN AIL

I I IUU Y, I Ylu I F-f 1 14.U, 1 7 1 1

i

Broadening SGC's constituency
(Continued from Page 4) dent, done somewhat more, though ago the administration worried worth much.) For the last few
to ignore SGC with impugnity in mostly by negotiation rather than about what SGC did and sometimes , years, The Daily has, for aMl prac-
almost every dispute. by confrontation, and with SGC's even sent spokesmen to argue tical purposes, decided the SGC
SGC's last major act was the power coming not from Council against this or that motion. presidential race and a majority
bookstore sit-in of fall, 1969. (And itself but from the SGC president's of the member-at-large races.
SGS's power then depended on ability to win support from the WHAT HAPPENS to SGC now? What was once the -,enter of SGC
what SGC had been before.) For various school and college govern- The radicals took over SGC be- has become the peripheral right,
the rest of that year and for four ments. cause the traditional constituen- imbecilizing debate, taking the
months of the next, SGC, with a SGC's weakness today is strik- cies - with the major exception of drama out of voting, and leaving!
radical president and a radical ing, especially if contrasted with The Daily - disappeared as politi- SGC motions nothing but paper.
majority, did little more than pass the SGC of previous years. We cal forces. (IFC, PanHel, IHA, and This election differs mportantly
paper motions. Since April, 1970, have forgotten, or now find it hard VOICE either no longer exist or no from other recent elections in three
SGC has, under a center-left presi- to believe, that only a few years longer give endorsements that are wa s.First the rihtist pin11

Daily Official Bulletin
FRIDAY. MARCH 26
Day Calendar'

10:30 am., Friday, March 26, at Hillt
Auditorium. Dr. William R. Keast, Pre-
sident of Wayne State University, will
address the Convocation. All undergrad-
uate classes, with the exception of
clinics and graduate seminars, will be
dismissed from 9:45 to 12:00' noon for

I -- .-'-.------. _____________________________
~ A

Religious Affairs and Ecumenical may be excused from clinics and rem-
Campus Sir.: Rev. Piyadassi, Buddist inars. The honor students will not wear
Monk, discussion w, T. Tice on "Cur- caps and gowns. Main floor seats will
rent Issues in Buddhist and Christian be reserved for them and for members
Thought," Ecumenical Ctr., 921 Church of their families, and will be held un-
St., roon. til 10:15. Doors of the Auditorium will
Astronomy Colloq.: F. Miller, "The open at 10:00. The public is invited.
February Meeting. Div. of the Plane- -a:.h _ sn
tary Science of the A.A.S. - Selected
Topics," P&A Colloq. Rm., 4 p.m. Placement
Religious Affairs and Ecumenical Ctr:
Rev. Piyadassi, "Buddism in the Wes- SUMMER PLACEMENT
tern World." Multipurpose Rm., UGLI, 212 S.A.B.
4:30 p.m. Announcements: for details, call 764-
Creative Arts Festival: "Sid Shry- 7460.
rock Goes to Africa," E. Quad Aud., 7, 10 Santa Fe Railway, Chicago. following
p.m. openings in various parts of the coun-
Relig. Affairs and Ecumenical C t r try, res. asst. in cost analysis, clerical,
Rev. Piyadassi, Missionary from Cey- switchmen/brakemen. waiters, c o o k s
lon. "Buddhism and the Future," Ecu- repair and locomotive maintenance.
menical Campus Ctr, 921 Church St., technician type positions.

C
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Keeping a radical perspective

(Continued from Page 4)
TO UNDERSTAND SGC it is
necessary to generally understand
areas that Couniel has been in-!
volved in.
1. Protecting student rights and
advocating student power. In 1966
the SGC slogan was "let the stu-
dents decide." Since that t i me
Council has been involved inI
fighting the whole range of the
University's loco-in-parentis regu-
lations.
SGC worked for years to estab-
lish policy boards in the Office
of Student Services, which h a s
jurisdiction over a broad range of
major student services, including
University housing. Though this
was accomplished last fall, the
minimal institutional power gain-
ed has clearly not been embraced
by the Regents, and efforts to
strengthen, maintain and broaden
the concept of policy boards in
other areas of the University must
be made.
SGC has fought continually for
the concept that students should
be disciplined for non-academic
offenses only by other students,
This began with the Joint Judic-
iary Council (the forerunner of
Central Student Judiciary) state-
ment that it would only enforce
rules approved by students. Since
that time, SGC has opposed facul-
ty-dominated judiciaries and more
recently the Interim Rules and
Disciplinary Procedures adopted
by the Regents last April. Coun-
cil has been working with t h a
Committee on a Permanent Jud-
ciary to establish all-student juries
to hear cases in which students
are the defendents.

2. Political role. Over the past
five years, SGC has taken an in-
creasingly active role in University
politics. The language require-
ment, ROTC, the bookstore, the
Black Action Movement strike and
the classified and military re-
search issues are all cases where
SGC has been active. There are
four ways that Council has acted
politically. First, SGC has tried to
inform and politically educate stu-
dents through speaking, leaflet-
ting, setting up educational for-t
ums and printing a newsletter. 1
Secondly, Council has acted in
a supportive capacity for many
campus political movements. This.
includes finances, facilities, en-
dorsements and at times, personal
power.
Thirdly, Council has initiated
political actions when possible and
has often done the groundwork
on issues before they become
prominent.
Fourthly, Council members and
officers have used their positions
as a political base 'to become in-
volved in political efforts, con-
frontations and negotiations.
3. Governmental role. SGC is in-

volved in many day-to-day activi-
ties that most students never hear
about. SGC appoints students to
many different committees andj
councils throughout the Univer-
sity, such as the OSS Policy
Board, University's Commission on
Women, University Council and
the Bookstore Board of Direc-
tors.
4. Service role. SGC has long
been active in consumer and legal
services for students.3
And if the funding proposal on
the SGC ballot next week passes,
SGC is likely to become more in-
volved in services, and could start
projects concerning housing,
childcare and University-wide
course and faculty evaluation.
IT IS ESSENTIAL that those
involved in SGC realize the im-
portant political role the Council
has. SGC must always be ready to
oppose the arbitrary actions of a
University run in the political in-
terests of business, government
and the military. Without thisI
perspective, SGC becomes little
more than a co-opted service or-
ganization.

wayo. ,1 W i 1-'
ganized. For the first time in my
memory, the right has fielded a
strong presidential canlidate and'
a hard-campaigning slate of candi-
dates for member-at-large. Second,
the radicals have run a feeble
campaign and seem almost to ex-
pect defeat, as if They realized
they have dominated SGC too long.
And third, there seems to be
emerging a new system of organ-
ized constituencies. Campus poli-t
tics used to be organized by 1esi-
dence unit. It seem that hereafter
it will be organized by academic!
unit. The last few years have seen
the emergence of a student govern-
ment in almost every school and
college of the University.
IT'S A STRANGE positirn these
reflections leave me in, welcomirg

DICTATION

(dike

7:30 p.m.
School of Music: Univ. Arts Chorale
and Mich. Singers, M. Klein. conduc-
tor. Mozart's "Requiem," Brahms' "Lie-
beslieder," Hill Aud., 8 p.m.
School of Music and Art Dept.: "The
Threepenny Opera," Mendelssohn Thea-
tre, 8 p.m.
International Folk Dance: BarbourI
Gym. 8 p.m.
Michifish: Annual Watr Show, Mar-
garet Bell Pool, 8:15 p.m.
International Students Association:
Folk singers S. Werein and D. Ruther-
ford, Rive Gauche, 9 p.m.+
India Discussion Group: K. Ramaur-
thy, visiting scholar at Ctr. for Popu-
lation Planning, "Rural Reconstruc-
tion: One Pattern of District Develop-
ment in India," International Center,
603 E. Madison, Sat., Mar. 27, 2:30 p.m.

Cedar Pt., Ohio, food dept. and oper-
ations; join the courtesy corps.
Waverly Schools. Lansing, s u m mi e r
recreation prog., instructors needed in
tennis, golf, archery and gymnastics,
RCA Corp., N.J., summer intern posi-
tions avail. in Camden, Highstown; and
Vurlington, Mass.
Equitable Life Assurance Co., N.Y.,
summer actuarial training prog. for
undergrads, at least 2 yrs. of math,
econ., or stat.
Penn Dept. of Trans., Harrisburg, civ-
il engr. trainee program open to stu-
dents who have completed soph. yr.
(Continued on Page 12)

lectures). Even includes back-space review so
you con hear it again.

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the defeat of those I supported and Undergrad Honors Convocation: The
annual Convocation recognizing under-
even now support! graduate honor students will be held at
Ir

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& DOUG RUTHERFORD

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Daily Classifieds
Bring Results !

11

See the masked man,
Tonto and Silver
Friday at 8,10, or 12
50c ALH 763-0795

ALICE'S
(plus an X-rated short)
Buck Rogers serials are still
being shown FREE-Wed, of
9

University Activities Center
presents
Creative Arts Festival 1971
VIETNAM PHOTO DISPLAY
Ugli
Mar. 15-Mar. 31- UNDERGRADUATE ART SHOW
R-ckham Gallery, 3rd floor
Mar. 22-Mar. 24-- SILKSCREENING in the Fishbowl
Mar. 25 Entirely student-produced musical
"SID SHRYCOCK GOES TO AFRICA"
East Quad Auditorium, 8:00
tickets at the door
Mar. 26, 27- STUDENT PLAY
7:00 and 10:00
tickets at the door
Mar. 27- STUDENT CRAFTS FAIR
Union Ballroom, 10:00-10:00
Mar.,__- "TO BE YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK'
Hill Auditorium, 3:00
Tickets at PTP Box Office

4

l

Let's hear it for the drunks.

It's not the drink that kills, it's the drunk, the problem drinker, the abusive
drinker, the drunk driver. This year he'll be involved in the killing
of at least 25,000 people. He'll be involved in at least 800,000 highway
crashes. After all the drunk driver has done for us, what can we do for

a

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