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March 26, 1971 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1971-03-26

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fricinv AAnrA '74- lt)-71 ?W

THeI~GNDIYF~,~ A..L~'or

rI * uy iircuu , I %7/ 1

[ -.w

cinema

Highlights of

_1.

a cinematic weekend

Considering Alaska???
Accurate, comprehensive
brochure about opportu-
nities in construction, oil,
fishing a n d canneries,
others. Send $2.00 cash
or money order to JOBS

&*

By GAIL LENHOFF VROON
For those who marvel at the
superb acting of Charles Laugh-
ton, his work as a director will
come as a welcome surprise. The
Night of the Hunter is scheduled
for 1 p.m. today, on channel 9.
You would be well advised to
skip a class or two and see it,
for the film offers a frighten-
ingly beautiful visual experience.
Laughton chronicles the flight
of two children who discover
that their stepfather is plotting
to murder their mother and
steal the money that their dead
father hid away for them. The
camera recreates the two-di-
mensional world of childhood's
nightmares. As the two crawl
into an abandoned rowboat and
drift down the Mississippi. their
journey is evoked with surrealis-
tic primitivism, strikingly remi-
niscent of the paintings of
Rousseau.
Robert Mitchum gives a clas-
sic performance as the defrock-
ed Southern preacher, roaring
prayers at the top of his lungs,
and hunting the children on his
mule with the evangelical zeal
of a rabid weasel. With artful
hysteria, Shelley Winters plays
the scatterbrained, g u 11 i b 1 e
mother, Lilian Gish, well known
to Griffith fans, is cast as an
old woman rearing a houseful
of run-away children. and fend-
ing off the enraged Mitchum
with a Winchester rifle. A bi-
zarre, moving film.
* *
Tonight, Cinema. Guild pre-
sents a film by Preston Sturges.
Anyone who turns up for Berg-
mann or Chaplin. but fails to
show for Sturges is a dilettante
of a breed which obliges the
Guild to pass up lesser known
directors for those who will draw
enough patrons to balance the
budget. This tends not so much
to corrode as to restrict their
offerings.
Sturges, whose comedy de-
rives from Chaplin Keaton and
Harold Lloyd, represents a vital
link in the American comic tra-
dition.
Hail the Conquering Hero is
the story of Woodrow Lafayette
Pershing Truesmith, rejected by
the Marines due towhis chronic
hay fever. Those who have la-
bored through rain and sleet
and psychiatric notes to buck'
the draft will take perverse de-
light as the crestfallen 'hero'
endeavers to persuade his moth-
er that he is in Guadacanal
with "Our Boys." writes his girl
he has fallen in love with an-
other-and goes to work in a
shipyard.
"What happens when six real
Marines take Woodrow in hand
and forcibly escort him home,
his illfitting uniform bristling
with extremporaneous decora-
tions," wrote James Agee, "is
the stuff that makes Hail the
Conquering Hero one of the
year's most ingratiating pie-
tures."
This picture marks the high

point of Sturges' career, his per-
sonal favorite for which he was
nominated for an a c a d e m y
award. The quick-paced comic
dialogue presents a hilarious
manipulation of linguistic-levels.
Sturges, dubbed by Andrew Sar-
ris "a mixture of wise guy and
savant" is known for the com-
plex structure of his comedy.
Mad Wednesday, for example,
ran the last reel of Harold
Lloyd's classic The Freshman
then subjected Lloyd to Sturges
own improvisational variations.
If you are a fan of classic

American comedy, you can't af-
ford to miss this film,
* * *
"No doubt ycu will say that
I take myself very seriously,"
wrote Jean Luc Godard, "I do.
I think a film director has such
an enormous part to play that
he can't afford not to." Two or
Three Things I Know About Her
is the Guild's current testimony
to the seriousness with which
many critics take the "Shake-
speare of the cinema."
Godard conceived the film
from a newspaper clipping re-

inforcing his theory that one
must prostitute oneself in order
to live within French and ulti-
mately any capitalistic society.
It is consummate reportage, a
documentary of society's grad-
ual mutations - sprinkled with
liberal quoting from Raymond
Aron's Eighteen Lessons on In-
dustrial Society.
As usual, Godard suceeds in
his recreation of non-theatrical
spontaneity. And Raoul Cout-
ard's photography is superb, as
usual. But I have always been
rather suspicious of spontaneity

and regard Godard as a minor
director - amusing, but often
tedious. His typical French love
for the gangster film, western,
and the socially relevant results
in what seems to me a a series
of pretentious cinematic quota-
tions that lose their impact in
translation.
If only in reverence to his
large and often sophisticated
following, however, one is
obliged to study the films of
Godard to determine whether he
really does break the rules of
cinema for superior reasons.

IN ALASKA,

P.O. Box

1565, Anchorage, Alaska
99501.

Qggg gggga HIHEST"
r . a ** RATING
DOORS OPEN 12:45
SHOWS AT 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 P.M -Wanda Hae. .ewYor ,ay News
NEXT: "GOING DOWN THE ROAD"

-h -Odrama
'Shrycock': Students ane

By LAURIE HARRIS
So, ya see, Sid Shrycock left
for Africa and left behind New
York, two girls subletting his
apartment and a guy in search
of Shrycock, excitement a n d
himself. It may all sound a lit-
tle trite, but Marilyn Miller has
humorously and understanding-
ly put it all together for the
Creative Arts Festival's f i r s t
student musical.
It's all very simple, Ronna
(Joan Susswein), a short, hefty
and, therefore, sexless' girl
without love and self-rational-
ity falls madly in love with Joel
(Kurt Lauer) who falls madly in
love with Erika (Beth Titmuss)
who reciprocates his advances.
Susswein plays the too-well
meaning. self-deceived girl with
an overflowing exuberance and
understanding of the role. It is
never pleasant to watch the
nice, continually shafted kid get
shafted again, even though you
know from the start it's going to
happen. Ronna getting it to-
gether with Joel is simply too
good to be true . .. so it isn't.
And Lauer is the sensitive kid
in search of himself, as all of
us college students are. He
doesn't overplay the role, b u t
treats it with the care it w a s
created . . . not too corny and
close to reality. Even in the
certainty of love he is querul-
ously uncertain. Things fall
apart with Erika, always a lit-
tle plastic, a little too stereo-
typed with kites, air and brown
rice and Titmuss does little to
overcome the script.
But underneath this is the
fantastically funny subplot of
Marcia (Jan Young) and her
Rent your
Roommate with

fiance Harold (David Tipmore).
Newly engaged, Marcia emerges
from radicality to 'latent sub-
urban' picking wedding dresses,
exchanging recipes and "using
words like mastercharge and
patio" much to Harold's dis-
gust. Finally the two go to bed
together. Is she pregnant? Ask
the unnerved psychologist Har-
old and the doctor . . . they are
both of different opinions.
Young fills the suburban sen-
timental role of Marcia with the
nervous energy of a girl hang-
ing on the life or death of a
rabbit. And it's a real pleasure
to pull Tipmore from his usual
rank of the chorus into a real,
live comic lead. He plays the
role of Harold with marvelous
timing and dynamic figuration,
A special sort of praise must

be given to Laurie Birnbaunr
in her Mama Cass interpreta
tion as the head of Fat Libera
tion. With a belting voice an
more than one strategically
placed pillow, Birnhaum rasp;
out her eating lament, complet-
ing another humorous subplot
The actual excitement of the
play, however, is that it is tot.
ally student created. Though7
have never seen a Marilyn Mil-
ler production before, and ther
have been two, I am sure thi,
one shows a more mature devel-
opment in story line ... for it i,
complete. In his first attempt a
total collaboration, Daly Gon-
yea has created extremely diver-
sified and well-wrough music
The two, together, cover the
span of honest ingenuity to
marvelous satire. The latter
comes choreographically to head

YOU'RE INVITED ... .

A CONCERT BY
The Eastern Michigan Trio
Tschaikovsky "Trio in A Minor"
Mozart "Trio in B-flat Major"

TH IS SAT., MARCH 27,8:45 P.M.
at SHALOM HOUSE, 1429 H I LL ST.1

i
I

FREE

I

I

CINEMA II.
"La Grande Illusion"
FRENCH, 1937
with ERIC VON STROHEIM
directed by JEAN RENOIR
"I made 'La Grande Illusion' because I am a pacifist."
--R~enoir, 1938

Friday and Saturday
-PLUS-

7:00, 9:00 p.m.

.. q
d mus3c TMES THEE PLAYERS
n with Wendy Shankin's work on a rEW I
- "When love enters your life" 1. i. MU,
- bringing to the small East Quad;\
d Stage a miniature Busby Berke- music byDa e
y ley composition complete with
s a circle of high kicking legs..tf.,.4
Musically and lyrically it stret-
ches towards satire with "Ques-
e tions" a compilation of every
- trite love song - or now trite
I love song - man's musical staff
- and pen have ever wrought.
e The play only falls down once $'
s or twice in gauche innuendoes,
- but picks up to be a sensitive
s and plausible play. I don't think
t I ever believed students could,
- create something completely co-
- herent, but Miller, along with .: ...x.4.4
-her company, has filled this void
of my experience. 4~..
-ABORTION
can be less costly than you may Maric 2 26 27
think, and pregnancies of up to
12 weeks can be terminated for RE. LLEGE THEATRE
$175.00 },4~:
including doctors fees, labora- EAST QUAD TIckets $125 atthe dor
tory tests, all medication & T7a
j referral fee. Hospital and Hos-
pital affiliated clinics only. Safe,
Confidential, Immediate.
call
2 - Advance Tickets Sales: Wed., Thurs., Fri., March 24-26
Woman's Aid & Guidance Group
40 E. 54th St., N.Y., N.Y. 10022
"BRIAN DE PALMA'S 'HI MOM!' STANDS OUT FOR ITS WIT, ITS IRONIC GOOD
HUMOR, ITS MULTILEVEL SOPHISTICATIONS, ITS TECHNICAL INGENUITY, its
nervousness, and its very special ability to bring the'sensibility of the suburbs to the
sins of the inner city.
"As in DePalma's previous 'Greetings, the h u m o r at its best, is understated but
highly structured ... But 'Hi Mom!' is much sharper, crueler, and funnier!"
-ROGER GREENSPUN, N.Y. Times
"THE VILLAGER'S M' 'AS *H! -POST
"It is the sense of shared idiocy that makes Brian de Palma's'Hi Mom' so much more satis-
fying than the more pretentious 'Getting Straight,''The Landlord,' and 'Stanley Sweetheart.'
'Hi Mom' is not only funnier than these films, I T IS THE FIRST LEGI T IMAT ELY F U N N Y
FILM I'VE SEEN IN A VERY LONG TIME. The movie works because it is consistent, because
it is witty, because it is played beautifully and because it resolutely refuses to use most of
the cliches of current filmmaking, except when it wants to call attention to cliches."
-VINCENT CANBY, N.Y. Times
"MIGHT BE THIS YEAR'S
'PUTNEY SWOPE' r"

-WILLIAM WOLF, Cue Magazine
"ENORMOUS EXUBERANCE!:
A FUNNY MOVIE!"
--Richard Schickel, Life Magazine.y
"THIS IS WHERE IT'S AT!"
-Penelope Gilliatt, New Yorker Magazine
"UPROARIOUSLY FUNNY!"
-William Wolf, Cue Magazine
"STANDS OUT FOR ITS WIT
AND GOOD HUMOR!"
-Roger Greenspun, New York Times liLm om ,

0%

J

a Classified

Ad

e1

"A View From the Bridge"
with Carol Lawrence, Rof Vallone, Maureen Stapleton
screenplay by ARTHUR MILLER
directed by SIDNEY LUMET
FRIDAY and SATURDAY 11:00 p.m.

I

.y;AV "A:: }: ",. } }N" :" J:V: : ':"t},:":':{.: f ' " }, : Y. 4.5:"::': :'::.;.} ij .Y:AY . " t.SY:": Y ' ."t::":':J:1:R
"-;!% !i A ft 1".M :". ."1'.' ".'.. A':.:": }l .'.S"1.1."Nf::' ': :':1:":'f: :: !\:'.^7 :.:1:ti Y. J'. "'.Jf:. " 1::: } ' C"1f 7 .:"Y'}:.iS :'~."F"ii "::":: . " iM:?::

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN(
ARTS CHORALE
Presents
MOZART REQUIEM

i
::"' a
:,..<:
i
::
:: > r
i
C
.....

SUNDAY
MARCH 26, 27, 28
75c (separat

7:00, 9:00 p.m.
AUD. A., ANGELL HALL
e admission for each show)

FRIDAY, MARCH 26
HILL AUDITORIUM
MAYNARD KLEIN, Conductor
Admission Complimentary

8:00 P.M.

NEXT WEEK
MARLON BRANDO'S
"ONE-EYED JACKS"
Join The Daily
CIRCULATION DEPT.
Come in any afternoon
420 Maynard

k
4t

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8/lue4 pectacu/ap
featuring
Luther Allison
Doctor Ross

i i

a
..

University of Michigan Film Society (ARM)
presents

SUNDAY MARCH 28

8:00 p.m.

Michigan League Ballroom
Tickets on sale at door-$2.00
'IL

I - I

Marcel Carne's

NOMINATED FOR I
ACADEMY
AW ARDS1

BEST PICTURE
BEST DIRECTOR
BEST ACTRESS GP
BEST ACTOR
BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
BEST ORICINAL SCREENPLAY

E
i
t
i
GI,

Les enfanis du paradis
(Children of Paradise)
written by JACQUES PREVERT
with Arletty, Jean-Louis Barrault,
Pierre Brasseur, Pierre Renoir
FRIDAY-SATURDAY-SUNDAY
March 26, 27, 28

4

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